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The Witches (Le streghe)

The strangest Italian portmanteau picture of the sixties features glorious Silvana Mangano in dozens of costume changes, directed by big names (Visconti, De Sica, Pasolini) and paired with a woefully miscast Clint Eastwood. The other major attraction is a delightful music score by Piero Piccioni, with an assist from Ennio Morricone.

The Witches

Special Edition Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1967 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 (?) 111 105 min. / Le streghe / Street Date January 30, 2018 / 34.95

Starring: Silvana Mangano, Clint Eastwood, Annie Girardot, Francisco Rabal, Massimo Girotti, Véronique Vendell, Elsa Albani, Clara Calamai, Marilù Tolo, Nora Ricci, Dino Mele Dino Mele, Helmut Berger, Bruno Filippini, Leslie French, Alberto Sordi, Totò, Ciancicato Miao, Ninetto Davoli, Laura Betti, Luigi Leoni, Valentino Macchi, Corinne Fontaine, Armando Bottin, Gianni Gori, Paolo Gozlino, Franco Moruzzi, Angelo Santi, Pietro Torrisi.

Cinematography: Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editors: Nino Baragli, Adriana Novelli, Mario Serandrei, Giorgio Serrallonga

Original Music: Ennio Morricone, Piero Piccioni

Written by Mauro Bolognini, Fabio Carpi,
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Wolf (All-Region)

Aooowww — Woo! Jack Nicholson summons his inner dog — and dons the makeup and scary contact lenses — to go the Larry Talbot route. Unfortunately, his moon-howling nighttime life isn’t as interesting as the dog-eat-dog infighting in the publishing house where he works – where feral instincts and sharp lupine senses are a major aid to ‘getting a leg up’ on the competition. I know, cheap metaphors are the ruin of promising writers.

Wolf

All-Region Blu-ray

Indicator

1994 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 125 min. / Street Date November 20, 2017 / £14.99

Starring: Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, James Spader, Kate Nelligan, Christopher Plummer, Richard Jenkins, Eileen Atkins, David Hyde Pierce, Om Puri, Ron Rifkin, Prunella Scales, David Schwimmer, Michael Raynor.

Cinematography: Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editor: Sam O’Steen

Production Design: Bo Welch, Jim Dultz

Makeup Effects: Rick Baker

Original Music: Ennio Morricone

Written by Jim Harrison, Wesley Strick

Produced by Douglas Wick

Directed by Mike Nichols

I think my mother
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time

12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time
These days, major cinematographers like Emmanuel Lubezki and Ed Lachman are as much of a draw to serious moviegoers as the directors they work with. Currently, Roger Deakins’ masterful work in the visually stunning “Blade Runner 2049” has led to one recurring question above all: Will Roger finally win the Oscar? Among the more striking aspects of Deakins’ accomplishment is the use of color: Virtually every shot has a different palette.

It feels like something we’ve never seen before, but have we? How does today’s best cinematography stack up against the great color films of the past?

Since the early 20th century, there have always been experimentations with color cinematography, but it wasn’t until the late ’30s, with the massive success of “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone with the Wind,” that color films became a staple of international cinema. With films stretching from 1947 to 2011, from masters like Jack Cardiff to Lubezki,
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First ‘Guardians of the Galaxy v. 2’ Reactions Are in and…Surprise, Everyone Loves It

Plus, a plethora of post-credit scenes and news about vol. 3

There are still a couple of weeks before James Gunn releases Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2, but recently the film was screened for the press and despite a review embargo being in place, some took to Twitter to share their immediate reactions. The overall assessment? Check it for yourself:

Angie J. Han of Mashable called it “the McU at its very best,” while Mike Ryan at Uproxx says the film is “very fun” and “Baby Groot steals the show.” Germain Lussier of Gizmodo and io9 describes the film as “filled with tons of surprises and an unexpected amount of emotion,” and Anna Klassen of Bustle calls it “action-packed” with “even more classic 70s/early 80s music cues.”

Furthermore, when one member of the press revealed there’s not one, not two, not even three but four post-credit scenes, Gunn himself joined the conversation to reveal there
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Relaunched Quad Cinema to Host Lina Wertmüller Retrospective

Lina Wertmüller in “Behind White Glasses”

Italian filmmaker Lina Wertmüller made history as the first woman to receive an Academy Award for Best Director back in 1977 for “Seven Beauties.” The trailblazer’s prolific career will be celebrated with “Female Trouble,” an upcoming retrospective held at the relaunched Quad Cinema in New York. Screenings will include “Seven Beauties,” world premieres of new restorations from Kino Lorber, rare imported 35mm prints, and “Behind White Glasses,” Valerio Ruiz’s documentary about Wertmüller’s life and career.

“In the 1970s, Lina Wertmüller was a certifiable international phenomenon — a lively firebrand behind white glasses who became one of the decade’s marquee-name filmmakers,” a press release for the event details. “Her hot-button, epically-titled movies — erotic and polemical and provocative all at once — became must-see conversation pieces and smashed American box-office records for foreign-language films.”

Female Trouble” will include screenings of “Swept Away,” Wertmüller’s update of Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew,” “A Night Full of Rain,” her English-language debut, and “Summer Night,” a Sardinia-set comedy that tackles bondage and voyeurism.

“This series finally offers the opportunity to dive into the history of this extraordinary director, an aesthetic pioneer and a crucial trailblazer in a male-dominated industry,” the event’s press release emphasizes.

Female Trouble” runs from April 14-April 30. Check out the titles screening below, courtesy of Quad Cinema. More information will be available on the theater’s website.

Swept Away (Travolti da un insolito destino nell’azzurro mare d’agosto)

Lina Wertmüller, 1974, Italy, 116m, Dcp

Special weeklong revival engagement begins April 21

For her kinky update of The Taming of the Shrew, Wertmüller reteams gorgeous green-eyed muses Mariangela Melato and Giancarlo Giannini as a vacationing society dame and her Communist servant locked in the ultimate battle of the sexes (and classes) once stranded together on a deserted island. Never mind the unfortunate Madonna remake — this bracing, sexy, riotous political fable, one of the most argued-about films of the 1970s, has to be seen to be believed. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Seven Beauties (Pasqualino Settebellezze)

Lina Wertmüller, 1975, Italy, 115m, Dcp

Special weeklong revival engagement begins April 21

Under fascism, there are no limits to sacrificing one’s honor — and in Wertmüller’s outrageous picaresque, comedy and tragedy are indistinguishable. When city hustler Giancarlo Giannini accidentally murders the lover of one of his seven sisters, a series of mishaps land him in a concentration camp, where he must seduce the homely Nazi commandant to stay alive. Controversial in its day, the film led Wertmüller to become the first woman nominated for a Best Director Oscar. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

“A handbook for survival, a farce, a drama of almost shattering impact. It’s a disorderly epic, seductively beautiful to look at, as often harrowing as it is boisterously funny.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Behind the White Glasses

Valerio Ruiz, Italy, 112m, Dcp

Special weeklong engagement opens April 21

This definitive documentary traces the incredible life of Lina Wertmüller, from her start as a tenacious Fellini assistant to her meteoric rise as a global superstar. The vivacious and fabulous 88-year-old filmmaker recounts the saga of her marriage to designer-collaborator Enrico Job, shows off her trademark eyewear collection, and even sings. Giancarlo Giannini, Sophia Loren, Rutger Hauer, and Martin Scorsese give revealing interviews for this loving portrait, which offers a corrective to decades of critical neglect. Official selection: Venice Film Festival. A Kino Lorber release. In English and Italian with English subtitles.

Director Valerio Ruiz in person at select shows opening weekend. A Kino Lorber release.

“Must-viewing for film buffs.” — The Hollywood Reporter

All Screwed Up (Tutto a posto e niente in ordine)

Lina Wertmüller, 1974, Italy, 105m, Dcp

In Milan, a bawdy group of Sicilian migrants meet-cute and move into a commune together, while they struggle to keep their livelihood — and hold their libidos in check. Wertmüller’s polyphonic farce, with its large ensemble and earworm theme music, helped to further establish her ongoing fascination with the struggles and shenanigans of Italy’s working class. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Breathtaking…exuberantly funny. Watching All Screwed Up is to be witness to a giant talent.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Blood Feud (Fatto di sangue fra due uomini per causa di una vedova. Si sospettano moventi politici)

Lina Wertmüller, 1987, Italy, 124m, 35mm

The always-ravishing Sophia Loren stars as a Sicilian widow who loses her husband to the Mafia. Setting out to avenge his death, she becomes entangled in a lurid love triangle along the way, her smitten suitors played by Giancarlo Giannini and Marcello Mastroianni. Lust, revenge, and violence reign supreme in this steamy WWII-set thriller. In Italian with English subtitles.

8 ½

Federico Fellini, 1963, Italy, 138m, 35mm

After her old school friend Flora Carabella married Marcello

Mastroianni, Wertmüller met Fellini and won an apprenticeship on

his seminal portrait of creative crisis. She helped the maestro cast extras

(including her own mother) but Wertmüller didn’t remain an assistant for

long: the same year Fellini helped her secure financing and

cinematographer Gianni Di Venanzo to shoot The Lizards.

In Italian with English subtitles.

Ferdinando e Carolina

Lina Wertmüller, 1999, Italy, 102m, Dcp

One of Wertmüller’s handsomest productions, detailing the life (and death) of King Ferdinand of Naples, here dramatized as another of her sex-crazed heroes. He reminisces of his days as a young philanderer, lamenting his impending marriage to 16-year-old Carolina of Austria — until they discover their shared taste for libertine pleasures. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Let’s Talk About Men (Questa volta parliamo di uomini)

Lina Wertmüller, 1965, Italy, 91m, 35mm

Wertmüller’s controversial sexual politics are already in full effect in this early episodic farce. A sassy response to Ettore Scola’s Let’s Talk About Women, the film is told as four independent stories — each more outlandish than the next. Brace yourselves for some unconventional solutions to marital discord, including kleptomania and knife-throwing. In Italian with English subtitles.

The Lizards (I basilischi)

Lina Wertmüller, 1963, Italy, 85m, 35mm

Using experience gained as an assistant director on 8 ½ (and using some of Fellini’s crew), Wertmüller made a debut that feels like a direct response to her mentor’s I Vitelloni: a compassionate snapshot of small town coming-of-age, Italian style. But Wertmüller’s treatment, shot for only $60,000, features a style and energy all her own, plus a Morricone score. In Italian with English subtitles.

Love & Anarchy (Film d’amore e d’anarchia, ovvero ‘stamattina alle 10 in via dei Fiori nella nota casa di tolleranza…)

Lina Wertmüller, 1973, Italy, 129m, Dcp

Silk robes and bare breasts abound in this tragicomedy of epic proportions set in a brothel pre-wwii. Freckle-faced ingénue Giancarlo Giannini comes to Rome on a mission to kill Mussolini with the help of politically active prostitute Mariangela Melato. But love gets in the way of anarchy when he falls for one of her fellow ladies of the night. In Italian with English subtitles. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Executed with the high-pitched passion of a gothic romance with a fluid, whirling, dazzling energy.” — Newsweek

A Night Full of Rain (La fine del mondo nel nostro solito letto in una notte piena di pioggia)

Lina Wertmüller, 1978, Italy/Canada, 104m, 35mm

Cocksure Communist journalist Giancarlo Giannini elopes with feminist photographer Candice Bergen in Wertmüller’s English-language debut. With no shortage of furtive lovemaking amid endless close-ups of its ever alluring leads, Giuseppe Rotunno’s camera works overtime to provide some of the most lavish imagery of the director’s career.

The Seduction of Mimi (Mimì metallurgico ferito nell’onore)

Lina Wertmüller, 1972, Italy, 112m, Dcp

A wistful romance turned raunchy comedy, this searing take on sexual and political double standards finds laborer Giancarlo Giannini ricocheting between mafiosos and comrades — as well as between his apparently frigid wife and beguiling mistress (Mariangela Melato). In Wertmüller’s world, the bedroom is the only appropriate battleground for revenge — for men and women alike. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Rollicking fun.” — Judith Crist, New York

Sotto…Sotto (Sotto… sotto… strapazzato da anomala passione)

Lina Wertmüller, 1984, Italy, 105m, 35mm

A stroll through a sculpture garden inspires a bored housewife to pursue a love affair with her girlfriend, in the spirit of the romantic thrill of her beloved movie melodramas; but her homophobic carpenter husband flies into an increasingly desperate rage as he tries to uncover his wife’s lover. In Italian with English subtitles.

Summer Night (Notte d’estate con profilo greco, occhi a mandorla e odore di basilico)

Lina Wertmüller, 1986, Italy, 94m, Dcp

Even by Wertmüller’s standards this outrageous ’80s companion to Swept Away offers up a particularly impressive menu of sexual perversions, from voyeurism to bondage, plus a severed finger. A Valentino-clad Mariangela Melato plays an especially entitled aristocrat who holds an infamous kidnapper (Michele Placido) hostage for ransom — and animalistic fun — in her gothic palace in remote Sardinia. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Relaunched Quad Cinema to Host Lina Wertmüller Retrospective was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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De Sica and His Dynamic Duo Do What They Do Best: Close-Up on "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Vittorio de Sica's Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963) is playing January 8 - February 6, 2017 in the United States.Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963), winner of the 1965 Oscar for Best Foreign Film, is a trio of stories directed by Vittorio De Sica in the omnibus fashion so popular at the time (just the year prior, he had contributed to the similarly structured Boccaccio ‘70, alongside Federico Fellini, Mario Monicelli, and Luchino Visconti). Spearheaded by international super-producer Carlo Ponti—helping to ensure global distribution and award-worthy prestige—the film is, first and foremost, a collaborative compendium of what partially defined the popular perception of its versatile director and its two leads, Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.The first short, “Adelina,” was written by Eduardo De Filippo and Isabella Quarantotti, the second, “Anna,” by Bella Billa, Lorenza Zanuso, and one of Italian neorealism’s founding fathers,
See full article at MUBI »

Joshua Reviews Federico Fellini’s Roma [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

From, literally, the film’s opening title cards, Roma announces itself as something of a visual feast. A blood-red screen introduces us to the proceedings, with the four letters making up the Italian name for the nation’s capital of Rome fading in in all of their grand, pitch black glory. It’s a bombastic introduction to one of director Federico Fellini’s most esoteric and yet deeply personal motion pictures.

Also known in some circles as Fellini’s Roma, film critic Vincent Canby was right in suggesting that that specific title might be the real way we should look at this picture. While taking the title from the real capital city of Italy, this is not a Rome anyone recognizes at first glance. Seemingly a journey through the streets of a Rome from a universe just adjacent to ours, Fellini all but neglects anything truly resembling a coherent narrative,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Federico Fellini’s Roma

Federico Fellini’s best non-narrative feature is an intoxicating meta-travelogue, not just of the Eternal City but the director’s idea of Rome past and present. The masterful images alternate between nostalgic vulgarity and dreamy timelessness. Criterion’s disc is a new restoration.

Fellini’s Roma

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 848

1972 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 13, 2016 / 39.95

Starring Peter Gonzales, Fiona Florence, Pia De Doses, Renato Giovannoli, Dennis Christopher, Feodor Chaliapin Jr., Elliott Murphy, Anna Magnani, Gore Vidal, Federico Fellini.

Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editor Ruggero Mastroianni

Original Music Nino Rota

Written by Federico Fellini and Bernardino Zapponi

Produced by Turi Vasile

Directed by Federico Fellini

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Federico Fellini stopped making standard narrative pictures after 1960’s La dolce vita; from then on his films skewed toward various forms of experimentation and expressions of his own state of mind. Most did have a story to some degree,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Five Days One Summer

The great Fred Zinnemann's last feature is a very personal story, a fairly uncomplicated drama with a mountain climbing backdrop. Sean Connery plays older than his age as a Scotsman on an Alpine vacation, toying with social disaster. With excellent, non- grandstanding performances from Betsy Brantley and Lambert Wilson. Five Days One Summer DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1982 / Color / 1:85 enhanced widescreen / 108 96 min. / Street Date July 12, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Sean Connery, Betsy Brantley, Lambert Wilson, Jennifer Hilary, Isabel Dean, Gérard Buhr, Anna Massey, Sheila Reid, Emilie Lihou. Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno Film Editor Stuart Baird Original Music Elmer Bernstein Written by Michael Austin from the story 'Maiden Maiden' by Kay Boyle Produced and Directed by Fred Zinnemann

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Fred Zinnemann is a filmmaker that I've come to admire, as much for his personal integrity as for the movies he made. He could be inconsistent and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Fellini’s City of Women

That naughty boy Federico Fellini goes all out with this essay-hallucination about women, a surreal odyssey that hurls Marcello Mastroianni into a world in which women are no longer putting up with male nonsense. It's an honest (if still somewhat sexist) effort by an artist acknowledging illusions and pleasures that he knows are infantile. City of Women Blu-ray Cohen Media Group 1980 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 139 min. / La cittá delle donne / Street Date May 31, 2016 / 39.98 Starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anna Prucnal, Bernice Stegers, Iole Silvani, Donatella Damiani, Ettore Manni, Fiammetta Baralla, Catherine Carrel, Rose Alba. Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno Film Editor Ruggero Mastroianni Original Music Luis Bacalov Written by Brunello Rondi, Bernardino Zapponi, Federico Fellini Produced by Franco Rossellini, Renzo Rossellini, Daniel Toscan du Plantier Directed by Federico Fellini

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Federico Fellini's 1980 City of Women was called 'wonderfully uninhibited' by The New York Times. Fellini's output slowed to a crawl in the 1970s,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Candy

The dirty book of the '60s became an all-star dirty movie with Brando, Burton, Starr, Coburn, Matthau, Astin, Aznavour and Huston all wanting a taste of the Swedish nymphet Ewa Aulin. Camerawork by Rotunno, designs by Dean Tavoularis, effects by Doug Trumbull -- and the best material is Marlon Brando making goofy faces as a sub-Sellers Indian guru. Candy Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1968 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 124 min. /Candy e il suo pazzo mondo / Street Date May 17, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ewa Aulin, Charles Aznavour, Marlon Brando, James Coburn, Richard Burton, John Astin, John Huston, Walter Matthau, Ringo Starr, Anita Pallenberg, Elsa Martinelli. Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno Production Designer Dean Tavoularis Opening and closing designed by Douglas Trumbull Film Editor Giancarlo Cappelli, Frank Santillo Original Music Dave Grusin Writing credits Buck Henry from the book by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg Produced by Robert Haggiag Directed by Christian Marquand

Reviewed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Luchino Visconti’s Masterpiece ‘Rocco and His Brothers’ Gets Theatrical Re-Release Trailer

After being a major influence on his work, Martin Scorsese worked with Milestone Films to bring forth a stellar-looking restoration of Luchino Visconti’s 1960 classic drama Rocco and His Brothers. After stopping by various festivals, including Tiff and Nyff, it’ll be released in NYC and Los Angeles next month, followed by hopefully a home release.

We now have a new trailer, which is fairly brief, but gives us a glimpse at the restoration while introducing our main ensemble. Starring Alain Delon, Annie Girardot, and Claudia Cardinale, check out the trailer and gorgeous poster (designed by Lauren Caddick) below for the film which kicks off its three-week run at Film Forum on Friday, October 9.

Joining the tragic exodus of millions from Italy’s impoverished south, the formidable matriarch of the Parondi clan (Katina Paxinou, Best Supporting Oscar winner, For Whom the Bell Tolls) and her brood emerge from Milan’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

New on Video: ‘Fellini Satyricon’

Fellini Satyricon

Written by Federico Fellini and Bernardino Zapponi (adaptation and screenplay) and Brunello Rondi (additional screenplay)

Directed by Federico Fellini

Italy, 1969

It’s somewhat surprising that in 1971, Federico Fellini was nominated for a best director Academy Award for Fellini Satyricon. To say the least, it’s a very un-Oscar type of film, especially by today’s standards. But it is a film, an exceptional one, that truly from start to finish conveys the creative imagination of its directorial guiding force. So perhaps in that regard, the nomination makes sense. This very rationale is also the reason why Fellini remains one of the greatest of all film directors, and why Fellini Satyricon, though not at all his best work, nevertheless remains so fascinating and precious. As its title suggests, the movie explicitly expresses the personal vision of its director—more than his name above the title, Fellini’s name was the title.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Fellini Satyricon' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

I'm a huge fan of Federico Fellini's films, films that have essentially become part of the the fabric of cinema history. This largely refers to La Dolce Vita, 8 1/2, La Strada, The Nights of Cabiria and Amarcord. Of course, I've also seen and enjoyed I Vitelloni and Juliet of the Spirits while also not particularly loving The White Sheik or Ginger & Fred. I mention this only as a note that I will pretty much devour whatever Fellini feature is placed in front of me, and as much as I was ready to delve into this new Criterion release of his 1969 feature Fellini Satyricon, I can't say the trip was an enjoyable one. Admittedly, Criterion always manages to deliver something intriguing with their releases and this new Blu-ray edition of Fellini Satyricon is no different, but not for the film itself, more for the supplemental material that makes you start to
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Criterion Collection: Fellini Satyricon | Blu-ray Review

Considered amongst the few surviving ancient novels as one of the best depictions of the wild debauchery that seized early Roman society, Petronius’s episodically fractured text The Satyricon tells the tale of Encolpius and his friend and occasional lover Ascyltus, a pair of former gladiators, as they venture through a society rife with overindulgence, sexual proclivity and flippant violence, rotating in form and tone from serious to silly, poetic narrative prose to lyrical verse throughout. Fellini Satyricon, Federico Fellini’s extremely loose adaptation of Petronius’s novel, takes this already loose narrative form and applies the structure as a lens for interpreting the history of antiquity itself – vividly alien, wholly broken and humanly detached from our own worldly norms. The result is a film that, in its unleashed inhibitions, leaves us as an audience in awe of its cinematic freedom, yet at odds with the tale as an empathetic journey through time.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Fellini's 'Satyricon', Roeg's 'Don't Look Now', Ozu's 'Autumn' & More Come to Criterion in February 2015

If you're reading this you're likely a fan of the Criterion Collection, which also means as much as you may be interested to know what new titles are coming to the collection in February 2015, if you aren't yet aware, Barnes & Noble is currently having their 50% of Criterion sale right now, click here for more on that. However, if you're already hip to the sale, let's have a look at the new titles that were just announced. The month will begin on February 3 with a new film from Jean-Luc Godard, his 1980 feature Every Man for Himself starring Jacques Dutronc, Nathalie Baye and Isabelle Huppert. It's a film Godard refers to as a second debut and is described as an examination of sexual relationships, in which three protagonists interact in different combinations. The release includes a new high-definition digital restoration, a short video titled Le scenario created by Godard to secure financing for the film,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

On the Beach | Blu-Ray Review

Within the well intentioned lexicon of Stanley Kramer’s filmography, his 1959 title, On the Beach remains the most prescient, a post-apocalyptic science fiction filmed steeped in light melodrama. Winner of the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Score (Ernest Gold) and a pair of Oscar nominations, nuclear fallout after the deployment of mankind’s deadliest war time weapons has rendered mankind obsolete with the exception of the inhabitants of Australia and the crew of the U.S. submarine Sawfish, guided by Captain Dwight Towers (Gregory Peck). An Sos signal in San Francisco leads Towers out with a crew to determine if the radioactivity has abated, but there’s no such luck. Worse, the radiation cloud will soon reach Australia’s shores, leaving the last remnants of humanity little time to grapple with the encroaching end.

As the last remaining humans navigate their remaining days of existence in Australia, paralyzed by
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

A Look Back at the Cannes Palme D’or Winners from the 60s: ‘The Leopard’

The Leopard

Directed by Luchino Visconti

Italy, 1963

Upon sitting down to write a review of Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard, I thought about the monumental task in front of me: ‘How do I do justice to one of the greatest films ever made?’ It’s easy: I can’t. I mean, I’ll do my best, but no amount of complimentary adjectives or animated textual analysis can re-create the affecting experience of watching Visconti’s epic masterpiece.

Adapted from Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s posthumously published Il Gattopardo, The Leopard takes place in a specific historical moment—Italy’s Risorgimento period—but it could really be set anywhere at any time. It’s about the painful inevitability of adapting to change and the erosion of one norm for another. Don Fabrizio Corbera (Burt Lancaster) is the Prince of Salina, and with middle-age upon him and revolution around him, he understands
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Trailers from Hell: Larry Karaszewski on Visconti's Sweeping Epic 'The Leopard'

Trailers from Hell: Larry Karaszewski on Visconti's Sweeping Epic 'The Leopard'
A Criterion Royal Flush! concludes at Trailers from Hell, with screenwriter Larry Karaszewski introducing Luchino Visconti's Italian cinema classic "The Leopard," starring Burt Lancaster.Classical movie making of the highest order, Visconti’s sweeping 1963 epic set during the Italian revolution plants Lancaster (forced on the director by nervous producers, but ultimately a valued working partner) at the center of a long form feast for the senses, photographed by the great Giuseppe Rotunno (Amarcord, Satyricon) and with music by Nino Rota (La Dolce Vita, The Godfather). Surely a major influence on Bernardo Bertolucci’s grandiose epic 1900, also featuring Lancaster. Various versions exist, ranging from 205 minutes to 151. One of Martin Scorsese’s favorites.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Leopard

Classical movie making of the highest order, Luchino Visconti’s sweeping 1963 epic set during the Italian revolution plants Burt Lancaster (forced on the director by nervous producers, but ultimately a valued working partner) at the center of a long form feast for the senses, photographed by the great Giuseppe Rotunno (Amarcord, Satyricon) and with music by Nino Rota (La Dolce Vita, The Godfather). Surely a major influence on Bernardo Bertolucci’s grandiose epic 1900, also featuring Lancaster. Various versions exist, ranging from 205 minutes to 151. One of Martin Scorsese’s favorites.

The post The Leopard appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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