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Silkwood

It’s a quality true-life mystery-exposé that doesn’t come off as tabloid trash or Oliver Stone hysteria — the true story of Karen Silkwood is told without cooking the books. The all-superstar cast is something too — Meryl Streep, Cher and Kurt Russell. Only a fine director like Mike Nichols could steer this one into good entertainment & memorable cinema territory.

Silkwood

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1983 / Color B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 131 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Meryl Streep, Kurt Russell, Cher, Craig T. Nelson, Diana Scarwid, Fred Ward, Ron Silver, Charles Hallahan.

Cinematography: Miroslav Ondrícek

Production Designer: Patrizia von Brandenstein

Art Direction: Richard D. James

Film Editor: Sam O’Steen

Original Music: Georges Delerue

Written by Alice Arlen and Nora Ephron

Produced by Larry Cano, Michael Hausman, Buzz Hirsch, Mike Nichols

Directed by Mike Nichols

Remember when the big movies about adult themes were in the theaters, and not on cable TV?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ken Loach: Europe Should Welcome Refugees, Not Send Them Back

Ken Loach: Europe Should Welcome Refugees, Not Send Them Back
In accepting their Crystal Globes at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival on Monday for the remarkable collaboration that produced a dozen films over 21 years, screenwriter Paul Laverty joked that he’s not sure how much director Ken Loach has understood him all this time. The strong Glasgow accent is something Laverty shares with some of Loach’s characters in “Sweet Sixteen,” one of their first outings and a tough, tender coming-of-age story about teens facing miserable odds in life.

When the film won the screenplay prize at Cannes in 2002, Laverty said, British critics complained they couldn’t understand a word of the dialogue and had to resort to reading the French subtitles.

Speaking to a packed house at the Hotel Thermal’s Grand Hall, Loach commended the festival for awarding him jointly with Laverty. “Too often all the attention goes to the director,” Loach said, adding that it’s teamwork that results in “the best things we
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Czech Classic ‘Intimate Lighting’ to Screen at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

Czech Classic ‘Intimate Lighting’ to Screen at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival
When lists of important filmmakers’ most impressive debut films are published, they rarely contain Ivan Passer’s “Intimate Lighting,” a title that deserves an automatic listing. Given that Passer is one of the leading voices of the much-lauded “Czech New Wave” of the ’60s, the oversight is all the more egregious.

But it’s not just Passer’s debut that needs renewed recognition, his unique voice and distinctive approach to storytelling is overdue for a serious critical re-evaluation. For my money, the best film about the tragic debacle in Vietnam is not “Apocalypse Now” or “The Deer Hunter,” but Passer’s “Cutter’s Way,” a film set not in the jungle battlefields of that conflict but on the sun-splashed streets of Santa Barbara.

Thanks to the Karlovy Vary Film Festival, there’s a chance to catch Passer’s brilliant first film on the big screen — an event sure to whet appetites for more.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Asc Chief Richard Crudo Holds Forth on Heart of Profession as 30th D.P. Gala Approaches

In his sixth year as president of the American Society of Cinematographers, Richard Crudo — who initially reigned over the invitation-only organization from 2003-06 and was re-elected in 2013 — has been a first-hand witness to revolutionary changes in the business, and has rubbed shoulders with many of the greats. At least three of those d.p. titans — Haskell Wexler, Vilmos Zigmond and Miroslav Ondrícek — died over the past year.

Their loss will be acknowledged Feb. 14 at the Asc’s 30th annual kudofest at L.A.’s Century Plaza Hotel. “Ordinarily we don’t do that at the awards, this is going to be the first time,” Crudo says. “It would be really irresponsible not to acknowledge these people.”

At a time when shooting on film is likened to etching a recording on vinyl, with only one film processing plant left in L.A., lensers and their collaborators nevertheless press on in formats
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Fireman’s Ball

Milos Forman was the prince of the Prague Spring with this Czech New Wave classic, a hilarious black comedy about the cheerful corruption and incompetence of petty bureaucrats. A fire brigade throws a bash, and by the end of the evening the lottery prizes are all stolen and the beauty contest has become a travesty. And they can't even put out a simple fire. The joke is clearly aimed at the Communist government. The Fireman's Ball Region-Free Blu-ray + Pal DVD Arrow Academy (UK) 1967 / Color / / 71 min. / Horí, má panenko / Street Date October 12, 2015 / Available from Amazon UK £14.99 Cinematography Miroslav Ondrícek Production Designer Karel Cerny Film Editor Miroslav Hájek Original Music Karel Mares Writing credits Milos Forman, Jaroslav Papousek, Ivan Passer and Václav Sasek Produced by Rudolf Hajek, Carlo Ponti Directed by Milos Forman

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

We know Milos Forman from his American pictures Hair and Ragtime, but he made big
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Is the most timely movie of 2015 a Blu-ray release of a movie from 1982?

  • Hitfix
Is the most timely movie of 2015 a Blu-ray release of a movie from 1982?
Based on a novel published in 1978, "The World According To Garp" was released in 1982, and yet watching the film on the recently-released Blu-ray from Warner Archive, I was struck by how timely and even urgent the material felt, and how much more adult and daring it is than most of the movies released by studios today. Not only do they not make them like this anymore, but I'd offer the opinion that they never really did. How can a film from 1978 have a better handle on the times we're living in right now than most of the films coming out this year? After all, much of John Irving's novel is a direct reaction to the late '70s and what Irving thought of the social landscape at that particular moment. How relevant could it be today, since we've obviously progressed so much since then? You'd be surprised. For those
See full article at Hitfix »

Richard Gere Pays Tribute to Dalai Lama at Opening of Karlovy Vary Film Festival

Richard Gere Pays Tribute to Dalai Lama at Opening of Karlovy Vary Film Festival
Karlovy Vary, Czech Rep. — Richard Gere struck a political note at Friday’s opening of the 50th edition of the Karlovy Vary Film Festival in the Czech Republic, where he received an award. Gere paid tribute to the Dalai Lama, while also taking a side-swipe at China.

Gere, who received the festival’s Crystal Globe for outstanding contribution to world cinema, mentioned that as well as being Karlovy Vary’s anniversary, this year marked the 80th birthday, on July 6, of the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibet.

Gere congratulated the Czech people on having a former president like the late Vaclav Havel, who had welcomed the Dalai Lama to his country when many other political leaders had not done so for fear of upsetting China, which controls Tibet.

“One of the extraordinary things is — in a world that is almost totally controlled by the Chinese communist government right now
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: "F/X" (1986) Starring Bryan Brown, Kino Lorber Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Director Robert Mandel's F/X is one of the most entertaining and compulsively watchable thrillers of 1986. I originally caught up with it on VHS and, while I was impressed with the film, the ending I found to be both hokey and frustrating, mostly due to the completely out-of-place 1982 song “Just an Illusion” by Imagination that plays over the end credits. I felt that it undermined all that preceded it. However, like William Friedkin's To Live and Die in La (1985) and David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986), F/X is a film that would only grow on me after subsequent repeated viewings. I learned to forgive the inclusion of this song as the final minutes should really be viewed as a visual pun on the film’s overall theme, which begs the question “What is real and what is fiction?”

F/X, which was released on Friday,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Daily | [in]Transition, Oppenheimer, Lang

The first peer-reviewed issue of [in]Transition features the likes of Adrian Martin and Kevin B. Lee on a total of four outstanding audiovisual essays on cinema. Also in today’s roundup of news and views: a guide to Stanley Kubrick’s lenses, a forthcoming book on The Shining, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Fritz Lang’s Spies, Colin Beckett’s critique of the work of Joshua Oppenheimer, Errol Morris and Jill Godmilow; interviews with Alex Gibney and Charles Grodin; and remembering Gene Saks, cinematographer Miroslav Ondrícek and Italian actor Rik Battaglia. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | [in]Transition, Oppenheimer, Lang

The first peer-reviewed issue of [in]Transition features the likes of Adrian Martin and Kevin B. Lee on a total of four outstanding audiovisual essays on cinema. Also in today’s roundup of news and views: a guide to Stanley Kubrick’s lenses, a forthcoming book on The Shining, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Fritz Lang’s Spies, Colin Beckett’s critique of the work of Joshua Oppenheimer, Errol Morris and Jill Godmilow; interviews with Alex Gibney and Charles Grodin; and remembering Gene Saks, cinematographer Miroslav Ondrícek and Italian actor Rik Battaglia. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Czech Cinematographer, Dies at 80

Miroslav Ondricek, Oscar-Nominated Czech Cinematographer, Dies at 80
Miroslav Ondricek, a Czech cinematographer who worked frequently with director Milos Forman and was nominated twice for Academy Awards, has died, according to several reports. He was 80.

Ondricek’s son David, who is also a filmmaker, announced the death to Czech television, though no cause was given.

Ondricek worked on more than 40 films in his career, about a dozen of which were shot in the U.S. He is perhaps best known for his work with friend Forman.

The two worked together on “Ragtime” and “Amadeus,” both garnering Oscar nominations for Ondricek for his cinematography. Ondricek won a BAFTA in 1984 for “Amadeus.” Ondricek and Forman, who currently lives in New York, also worked together on “Fireman’s Ball” early in Forman’s career and “Hair.”

Ondricek stayed busy throughout the ’90s, working with U.S. director Penny Marshall on 1990’s “Awakenings,” starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams, and 1992 comedy “A League of Their Own,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Varied Face of the Biopic

It seems that every award season cinemas big and small are assaulted by a glut of biopics. Whether they are a retelling of an inspirational personal triumph al a 127 Hours or whether they retell the stories of life’s heroes and characters. Already in the run-in to 2012’s Oscar Ceremony we have already had Phyllida Lloyd’s the iron lady which had a powerhouse of a performance from Meryl Streep, so at least there was some value if everything else was such a cataclysmic misfire. Other recent and forthcoming biopics include J.Edgar and Albert Nobbs. Instead of looking forward to those films, I will use this opportunity to list some examples of biopics that show how varied this mode of storytelling can be, without that reliance of awards baiting coming into view.

Raging Bull

Once upon a time Robert De Niro was one of the best actors in the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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