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Eat the Rich: Close-Up on Sofia Coppola’s "Marie Antoinette"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette (2006) is showing from April 8 - May 8, 2018 in the United Kingdom.In 2006, Juicy Couture, the clothing brand synonymous with velour tracksuits, released their first fragrance. Instantly beloved by teen girls, available at Walmart, Juicy Couture’s eponymous fragrance smells like tropical punch with base notes of dessert tray—synthetic aromas that choked high school hallways for at least half a decade hence. The print campaign for the fragrance features pastel hues, ribbons, puppies, and a rebellious rococo wardrobe. In it, a model wears a towering, cotton candy wig—as if she not only smells but is also slowly becoming edible. That same year, Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. Similarities between this historic-ish film and the Juicy Couture ad campaign are striking. Depending on who you talk to, Marie Antoinette
See full article at MUBI »

Amazon cancels Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons

Amazon has announced that it has cancelled its Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning comedy drama series Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us,” said executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman in a statement accompanying the news. “We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come.”

Inspired by Blair Tindall’s memoir Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs and Classical Music, the series stars Gael Garcia Bernal as Rodrigo, the conductor of the New York Symphony, alongside Lola Kirke, Saffron Burrows, Malcolm McDowell, Hannah Dunne and Bernadette Peters.

Via THR

The post Amazon cancels Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons appeared first on Flickering Myth.
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Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons

  • The Wrap
Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons
Mozart in the Jungle” is ending its four-season run, marking the first cancellation under Amazon’s new chief Jennifer Salke, the streaming network said.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us. We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come,” executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman said in a statement.

Also Read: Amazon Has Half as Many Paid Streamers as Netflix - But 50 Percent More Than Hulu (Report)

Salke — who stepped in to oversee all television and film production at Amazon in February after serving six years as entertainment president at NBC — has voiced her intent to pivot Amazon from niche projects to big-budget epics on the scale of “Game of Thrones.”

The comedy-drama series was inspired by “Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music,” the 2005 memoir of oboist Blair Tindall. Gael Garcia Bernal, Lola Kirke, Saffron Burrows, Hannah Dunne and Peter Vack also star.

The first season of “Mozart” was both a critical darling and a hit with viewers, winning two Golden Globes — one for Best Television Series – Comedy or Musical and a second for Garcia Bernal for Best Actor — and scoring a 95 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a 73 out of 100 on Metacritic.

Read original story Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Mozart in the Jungle’ Canceled After Four Seasons at Amazon

Amazon has canceled the Gael Garcia Bernal dramedy “Mozart in the Jungle” after four seasons.

The half-hour series helped establish Amazon as an awards player with its surprise Golden Globe win in 2016 for best comedy series and lead comedy actor for Bernal. The offbeat show, revolving around the life of a brash young conductor at the New York Symphony, hailed from executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola, and Jason Schwartzman.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Mozart in the Jungle Cancelled at Amazon After Four Seasons

This symphony has played its final note: Amazon has cancelled the Golden Globe-winning comedy Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Gael Garcia Bernal starred as Rodrigo de Souza, the new conductor for the New York Symphony, and the show followed his relationships with the orchestra’s various musicians. The supporting cast included Lola Kirke, Bernadette Peters, Malcolm McDowell and Saffron Burrows.

Mozart pulled off a surprise win in 2016 by taking home the Golden Globe for best musical or comedy series, beating out more established contenders like Veep, Orange Is the New Black and Transparent.
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘Mozart In The Jungle’ Canceled After Four Seasons On Amazon

The song is over for Mozart in the Jungle. Amazon today canceled its symphonic dramedy after four seasons, Deadline has confirmed. "We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us,” executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman said iun a statement. “We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come." Starring Gael García Bernal, Lola…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Isle of Dogs movie review: a breed apart, or a breed too far?

MaryAnn’s quick take… Absolutely delightful and utterly original, with its lovingly crafted stop-motion animation bursting with sweetness but also with a winking mockery. I have just a few caveats… I’m “biast” (pro): love Wes Anderson’s films

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto) women’s participation in this film

(learn more about this)

I confess: the first thing I thought at the end of Isle of Dogs is, “What an absolutely delightful and utterly original movie!” I was bothered by some very unoriginal narrowness of the female characters: the only female dogs with any significant presence in the film are defined solely as the mates of the male dogs; the male dogs are, of course, drawn as varied and complex characters, and this is very much their story alone. But I was willing to overlook that — though it
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Ranking The Films Of Wes Anderson

This weekend’s release of stop-motion treat Isle of Dogs marks the return of one of the greatest filmmakers working today, in my opinion: the brilliant Wes Anderson. With a limited, yet impressive, filmography under his belt and the arrival of his ninth film in cinemas, it felt like a more appropriate time than ever to take a look back at his career and rank all of his films thus far.

Related: Isle Of Dogs review [Berlinale]

It should be mentioned that I am a big fan of all of Anderson’s work; he is perhaps one of the only big-name directors yet to be swallowed whole by the blockbuster machine – there is always a wisp of excitement in the air every time he works on a new film. Ever since is debut Bottle Rocket, he has been illuminating our screens and hearts with his quirky charm and style. But, alas,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Jason Schwartzman & Cherry Jones Join Amy Poehler’s Netflix Comedy ‘Wine Country’

Jason Schwartzman & Cherry Jones Join Amy Poehler’s Netflix Comedy ‘Wine Country’
Exclusive: Jason Schwartzman and Cherry Jones are boarding Amy Poehler’s feature directorial debut Wine Country. They join a cast that includes Poehler, Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, Paula Pell, Maya Rudolph, Emily Spivey and Tina Fey. The Netflix comedy, written by Spivey and Liz Cackowski, follows longtime friends who head to Napa for the weekend to celebrate a 50th birthday. Production is already underway in Los Angeles and will end in Napa. Pic is produced by…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Review

Stars: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Kunichi Nomura, Greta Gerwig, Liev Schreiber, Jeff Goldblum | Written by Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, Kunichi Nomura | Directed by Wes Anderson

Isle of Dogs? I love dogs, too. There’s something about their wide-eyed inquisitive faces that makes them an ideal fit for Wes Anderson, the modern master of deadpan whimsy. Using stop-motion puppetry techniques (as simultaneously ultra-modern and old-fashioned as the name of his hero, Atari) Anderson crafts an animated odyssey which is wholly original in art design and conception, if not its broader structure.

Anderson and co-writers Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman and Kunichi Nomura throw in a ton of world-building exposition, but the film is visually compelling and strange enough that it never feels like a drag.

Though the chronology hops about like an excited puppy, the basic story – set twenty years in the future – is that dogs have been outlawed in the Japanese archipelago,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Isle of Dogs review – Wes Anderson unleashes a cracking canine caper | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week

Set in a dystopian Japan of the future, the animated story of a boy’s search for his lost pet is crammed with visual invention

It’s set in Japan, though east London’s Isle of Dogs just happens to be a short drive from 3 Mills Studios, which did a lot of the work on this film. So maybe our Isle of Dogs influenced the director, Wes Anderson. Or maybe he chose the title because it sounds like: “I love dogs.”

Isle of Dogs is another utterly distinctive, formally brilliant exercise in savant innocence from Anderson, somewhere between arch naivety and inspired sophistication. I laughed a lot, not really at jokes, but at its hyper-intelligent stabs of visual invention. It’s a stop-motion animation – like his Roald Dahl adaptation Fantastic Mr Fox (2009) – visually controlled to its every analogue micro-particle, a complete handmade world. The screenplay is by Anderson, along with Roman Coppola,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Isle Of Dogs – Review

Isle Of Dogs is a treat for fans of director Wes Anderson, who makes a welcome return to stop-motion animation ten years after The Fantastic Mr. Fox. Anderson’s new film looks raggedly beautiful, is hilariously off-balance, warm-hearted, and perfectly composed and detailed – much like every other Wes Anderson movie. The title is a reference to Trash Island, a mountainous accumulation of garbage where, in the near future, the canine population of Megasaki City in Japan is banished by cat-loving Mayor Kobayashi (voiced by Kunichi Nomura). This is after a plague of Snout Fever (also known as the Dog Flu) has broken out, endangering both dogs and humans. The pooches are dropped from planes onto the island where they battle over maggot-infested food scraps plucked from piles of trash. Mayor Kobayashi’s 12 year-old nephew Atari (Koyu Rankin) commandeers a small airplane and crash-lands it on Trash Island in hopes of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

How Do You Solve a Problem Like 'Isle of Dogs'?

How Do You Solve a Problem Like 'Isle of Dogs'?
When you see Wes Anderson's Isle of Dogs, which opened in a limited run and will go wide this weekend, you will undoubtedly be bowled over by the sheer imagination and technical chops on display. You will thrill to the extraordinary stop-motion animation – the director's first return to the form since his 2009 near-masterpiece Fantastic Mr. Fox – which not only makes sure each strand of fur seems tactile but lets you see the soul behind its canine characters' eyes. You may shudder at the way the movie portrays a futuristic dystopia in which,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Prances to Top Screen Average of 2018

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Prances to Top Screen Average of 2018
The debut of Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” led the pack at the indie box office this weekend.

Fox Searchlight’s stop-motion animated film opened with $1.57 million in just 27 locations. That equates to an average of $58,148 per screen, making it one of the top openings in recent years of a film with over 25 locations and the highest screen average of the year to date.

Created and directed by Anderson and written by Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, and Kunichi Nomura, the ensemble voice cast includes Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, and Bob Balaban. Set in a dystopian futuristic Japan, the film follows a young boy who goes searching for his dog after all of the species are quarantined on a remote island due to a canine flu.

Isle of Dogs” opened to critical praise, receiving an A from Cinemascore, as well as currently averaging a 93% on Rotten Tomatoes.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Isle of Dogs’: Stream Alexandre Desplat’s Score to Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Film

‘Isle of Dogs’: Stream Alexandre Desplat’s Score to Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Film
Not one to rest on his laurels, Alexandre Desplat is back in theaters mere weeks after winning the Academy Award for Best Original Score for his work on Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water.” As fate would have it, his latest score is for the same filmmaker he won his first Oscar for: “The Grand Budapest Hotel” director Wes Anderson, who’s made his second stop-motion film with “Isle of Dogs.” Listen below.

Set in near-future Japan, “Isle of Dogs” follows a group of canines who’ve been exiled by the villainous mayor of fictional Megasaki City, whose anti-dog agenda is rooted in centuries of family history. Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Bob Balaban, Kunichi Nomura, Ken Watanabe, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton, Scarlett Johansson, and Harvey Keitel all lend their voices to “Isle of Dogs,” which has earned widespread acclaim but also faced
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Star Jeff Goldblum: Wes Anderson’s Stop-Animation Film Is an ‘Anti-Bigotry’ Project With a Message

‘Isle of Dogs’ Star Jeff Goldblum: Wes Anderson’s Stop-Animation Film Is an ‘Anti-Bigotry’ Project With a Message
Wes Anderson’s fantastical new stop-motion animated feature, “Isle of Dogs,” might be set in a fictitious future Japan where man’s best friend has been exiled to a place literally called Trash Island, but there’s some timely stuff tucked inside the project, including a few messages that designed to dig right into the current state of the world — one that could probably benefit from its stance that, hey, getting rid of creatures you don’t like just because you can isn’t the best way to solve anything.

Star Jeff Goldblum, who lends his voice to the gossipy mutt Duke, agrees wholeheartedly. “I love the movie, I think it’s a monumental artistic achievement,” Goldblum said. “But I love the issues involved. The animal issue, the anti-bigotry — across all, as it relates to everybody — issue, the anti-fear mongering issue, the pro-student uprising issue.”

Asked about the particular timeliness of the film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Royal Tenenbaums,’ ‘Isle of Dogs’…

Wes Anderson movies: All 9 films ranked from worst to best include ‘The Royal Tenenbaums,’ ‘Isle of Dogs’…
Wes Anderson has never won an Oscar, much to the consternation of many indie film lovers. With six career nominations to his credit, he’s certainly a chief member of the Overdue Auteurs Club. But he could cash in that awards Iou with “Isle of Dogs,” an animated fantasy about a future where Japan has banished pups to a remote island to combat a strain of canine flu. It opens on Friday, March 23. Could the academy finally reward him with a Best Animated Feature win? And how does this latest effort compare to the rest of his filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of all nine of Anderson’s films ranked from worst to best.

Anderson made his directorial debut with “Bottle Rocket” (1996), released when he was just 27-years-old. He received his first Oscar nomination five years later: Best Original Screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001). He followed that eight
See full article at Gold Derby »

Wes Anderson Is an Advertising Genius: 15 Amazing Commercials Directed by the Indie Auteur — Watch

Wes Anderson Is an Advertising Genius: 15 Amazing Commercials Directed by the Indie Auteur — Watch
Wes Anderson is easily one of the most singular voices in contemporary cinema, and it turns out the same is true of Wes Anderson in the world of advertising. The director has been courted by companies such as American Express, Prada, Hyundai, and At&T over the years to unite their products with his trademark style, and the results are some of the best commercials of the 21st century.

In celebration of Anderson’s ninth feature “Isle of Dogs” opening in theaters, IndieWire looks back at Anderson’s celebrated collection of commercials and short film advertisements. The clips not only bare Anderson’s trademark style but also feature some of his greatest collaborators, including co-writer Roman Coppola, cinematographer Robert Yoeman, and actors like Jason Schwartzman and Adrian Brody.

Read More: Search The Complete Paul Thomas Anderson Music Video Collection, From Fiona Apple to Radiohead — Watch

Watch the director’s 15 most memorable ads below.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Jason Schwartzman Doesn’t Star in Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Animated Film, But It’s Still His Film

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Jason Schwartzman Doesn’t Star in Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Animated Film, But It’s Still His Film
At the New York premiere for “Isle of Dogs,” people kept congratulating Jason Schwartzman for his voice work as one of the alpha dogs in Wes Anderson’s animated movie. But here’s the thing: Schwartzman doesn’t voice any characters in Anderson’s latest. Still, as a co-writer, his fingerprints are all over the stop-motion animated offering.

The day after the premiere, the actor and screenwriter was laughing off well-wishers, including one who came up to him, seemingly eager to say congrats but aware that he didn’t know which character Schwartzman had played.

“This guy walks up and goes, ‘Mr. Droll, Mr. Droll,'” Schwartzman recalled. “These are people that are smart, intelligent, movie-going people that just saw this movie and think I’m in it. I don’t know who they think I am, and I don’t know what to say, so I just say, ‘Thank you.
See full article at Indiewire »
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