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New to Streaming: ‘Happy End,’ ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower,’ ‘Hostiles,’ ‘The Nothing Factory,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Behemoth (Zhao Liang)

There’s just one thing missing from Zhao Liang’s visually masterful documentary Behemoth: a before image of what this wasteland of coal and rock used to be before God’s beast was unleashed. That creature — as represented by the industrial machine — devours the mountains of Mongolia, exploding large formations into rubble to be separated by the Sichaun people acting as minions. These citizens become the cause and effect,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office

Breakout ‘Isle of Dogs’ Dominates Feast or Famine Specialty Box Office
Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” (Fox Searchlight) showed crossover strength as it widened on its second weekend to more major markets. And “Death of Stalin” (IFC) continues strong on the arthouse circuit.

Both added a much-needed boost to the anemic specialty market. Only three holdovers after their third week grossed over $50,000, including the final dates for Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water.” This marks the lowest numbers in years, and exposes the feast-or-famine nature of the current specialized box office.

The widest new opener, Roadside Attraction’s British senior romance “Finding Your Feet,” drew a mixed response in multiple initial cities.

Of the three new U.S. indies arriving with past festival branding, only Gemini (Neon) has a chance at real theatrical legs; “Love After Love” (IFC) is already streaming, and “Outside In” (The Orchard) hits Svod on April 3 before Netflix availability on June 1. The theatrical business is shifting: only
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review – Happy End (2017)

Happy End, 2017.

Written and Directed by Michael Haneke.

Starring Isabelle Huppert, Fantine Harduin, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Laura Verlinden, Franz Rogowski, Aurélia Petit, and Toby Jones.

Synopsis:

A drama about a family set in Calais with the European refugee crisis as the backdrop.

There is a lot going on in Happy End, the latest film from celebrated auteur Michael Haneke (Amour, Cache, The White Ribbon, so on and so forth), to the point where the end result is messy and disconnected. The characters are cold and unworthy of investing in, which isn’t a surprise to anyone familiar with the director, but long stretches of Happy End test patience and fail to generate any reaction. This is largely due to an unwieldy amount of subplots that never form into the bigger picture, even though all the major characters are part of the same dysfunctional, unhappy family. Depression and suicide are
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Happy End – Review

The family dynamic has provided inspiration to countless film makers over the years, working in almost every genre, from horror to comedy. Now acclaimed director Michael Haneke has returned to the big screen after nearly five years, with his own view of a family in crisis. With this group, financial strife is not a source of conflict as they would definitely be considered as part of the “one percenters”, proving once again that money certainly never guarantees happiness. Toss in a few well deserved jabs at current use of tech and social media, and Haneke offers his take on a clan that may not achieve a Happy End.

Speaking of tech, the first scenes of this story unfold on a “top of the line” cell phone, as pre-teen Eve Laurent (Fantine Harduin) records the nightly rituals of her mother (brushes teeth, combs hair, etc.) will sending snarky comments in texts to a friend.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama
Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke has made many a masterpiece – and his latest, Happy End, isn't one of them. Yet this cinematic poke in the eye about an upper class family imploding still exerts a perverse fascination. From early provocations like The Seventh Continent (1989) through later boundary-pushing works like The Piano Teacher, Cache, The White Ribbon, Funny Games (both the original and it's English-language remake) and Amour, the fillmaker specializes in the toxic indifference that can kill a family or society as a whole. He offers no easy answers. As the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Post’ Joins Top 2017 Specialty Box Office Openers

  • Indiewire
“The Post” (20th Century Fox), Steven Spielberg’s recreation of the 1971 Pentagon Papers First Amendment saga, opened strongly in nine theaters over three cities (Washington D.C. logically added to the usual New York and Los Angeles platform dates). On a weekend prior to Christmas that normally is not prime for its core older audience, it scored a strong initial result across the board. Its numbers in the four key usual platform theaters placed it among the biggest limited openers of the year, with likely better results still to come.

Two other openers, Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” (Sony Pictures Classics) and the Christian Bale western “Hostiles” (Entertainment Studios) also braved the tricky playtime to disappointing results. They are competing against multiple already established awards titles that continue to prosper in varying degrees.

The Darkest Hour” (Focus) had its broadest break to date, edging out by a small margin the
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Michael Haneke's "Happy End"

  • MUBI
What do you do when you near the end of your life and you have nothing left to live for? That's a question practically tailor-made for Michael Haneke, whose chilly austerity and bleak fatalism has and continues to be something of a trademark. This follow-up to Amour (which won the Palme d’Or in 2012) is imperfect and strange, and finds the Austrian director in an (unusually?) introspective mode, consciously working through images and fragments of his past films.The subject of Haneke’s attention, here, is the wealthy, bourgeois Laurent family, headed by aging patriarch Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant). His daughter Anne (Isabelle Huppert) runs the thriving family business with the help of her somewhat incapable son, Pierre (Franz Rogowski), while Georges' son Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is a doctor who recently had a child with Anaïs (Laura Verlinden), his second wife. For a while, the film looks to be the equal
See full article at MUBI »

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem

Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem
Michael Haneke received worldwide acclaim and two Oscar nominations for his tragic romance “Amour,” the mesmerizing tale of an elderly couple facing the inevitable specter of death. Though downbeat in the Haneke fashion, “Amour” also registered as the Austrian filmmaker’s most emotionally accessible work. His followup, “Happy End,” found a more mixed response — and yet, for serious Haneke devotees, it should hit all the right buttons. Still, Haneke remains such a singular director that, 30 years into his career, he continues to challenge even his greatest devotees.

For those among us, “Happy End” delivers one of the most enjoyably twisted movies of Haneke’s career. The story of a dysfunctional bourgeois family where self-loathing and suicidal thoughts loom large, it’s a profoundly cynical work so incisive that it renewed a once-familiar element in Haneke’s career trajectory: divisiveness. Following the filmmaker’s back-to-back Palme d’Or wins for “Amour” and “The White Ribbon,
See full article at Indiewire »

My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes Darkest Horse: from Slovakia…

My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes Darkest Horse: from Slovakia…
My Top Ten Oscar® Submissions for Best Foreign Language Film includes Darkest Horse: from Slovakia, ‘The Line’You know how, when you finally see a movie you really love, all things seem possible? How a great movie transports you to a new reality? Without that experience, normal life seems drab and dreary unless you use other means of transcendance, like hope, art, music, dancing, religion or drugs.

Have I yet raved about any of the 25 foreign language submissions?

Yes, but it was a long time ago when it won the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, that I was so enamoured Hungarian director Ildikó Enyedi’s Of Body and Soul (as I was with her previous film, the 1989 Cannes Film Festival Camera d’or winner, My Twentieth Century, which was seen by about a .02% of the population). But that was way back in February.

I would put my body
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Palme d’Or Winner ‘The Square’ Sweeps European Film Awards

Palme d’Or Winner ‘The Square’ Sweeps European Film Awards
Cannes Palme d’Or winner “The Square,” directed by Ruben Ostlund, scooped the best European film, comedy, script, director, and actor prizes at the 30th European Film Awards ceremony, which took place Saturday night in Berlin.

“We wanted to say something important, but we also wanted it to be entertaining and exciting – I think it’s part of a European approach,” said Ostlund upon receiving the prize for best European comedy. The provocative Swedish helmer cited “Toni Erdmann,” last year’s big winner at the European Film Awards, as another film that uses comedy to say something meaningful about humankind and society.

Robin Campillo’s critically acclaimed “Bpm (Beats Per Minute),” the winner of Cannes’ Grand Jury Prize, took home best editing out of several nominations.

Alexandra Borbely (“On Body and Soul”) won best actress, beating out French stars Isabelle Huppert (“Happy End”) and Juliette Binoche (“Bright Sunshine In”), as well as Florence Pugh (“Lady Macbeth”) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

European Film Awards: ‘The Square’ Wins Big in Near-Sweep at the Continent’s Most Prestigious Awards Ceremony

  • Indiewire
European Film Awards: ‘The Square’ Wins Big in Near-Sweep at the Continent’s Most Prestigious Awards Ceremony
The Square” was the big winner at the European Film Awards, taking nearly every top prize: Best Film, Director, Actor, Screenwriter, even Best Comedy for good measure. It continues a very good year for Ruben Östlund’s art-world satire, which won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and is considered a likely nominee for the Academy Award for Best Foreign-Language Film.

Also represented were “On Body and Soul,” which won the Golden Bear at Berlinale and earned Alexandra Borbely the Best Actress award, and “Communion,” which took the Documentary prize.

This year’s ceremony, the 30th, took place in Berlin. Avail yourself of the winner list below.

Read More:2017 European Film Awards Nominations: ‘The Square,’ ‘Bpm,’ ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer,’ and More Lead the Way Best European Film

“Bpm (Beats per Minute),” (Robin Campillo, France)

Loveless,” (Andrey Zvyagintsev, Russia, Belgium, Germany, France)

On Body and Soul,” (Ildiko Enyedi,
See full article at Indiewire »

Happy End review – gallows humour for all the family

Michael Haneke’s new film finds dark wit in assisted suicide, overdoses and the refugee crisis

Michael Haneke’s new film gleams with cold gallows humour. There’s blunt, rasping comedy to be found in its thematic grimness (Happy End might also be titled Death Wish), though the Austrian director’s bleak worldview won’t be to everyone’s taste. The plot begins with 13 year-old Eve (Fantine Harduin), who is forced to stay with her father Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz), in Calais, with his new wife and their young child after her mother overdoses. Also living in the Laurent family home is Thomas’s sister, severe real estate developer Anne (Isabelle Huppert), and their depressed father Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant of Haneke’s Amour), who at a robust 84 is “too healthy” to qualify for the assisted suicide he seeks, and so must make alternative arrangements. Eve moves quietly, watching the adults around her.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Interview: Claes Bang on 'The Square,' the Monarchy and Being Starstruck at the Governors Awards

By Jose Solís.

photo src

Like Christian, his character in The Square, Claes Bang speaks with impressive assertiveness. Even when he’s poking fun at himself, he sounds like a man who’s never had any doubts or gotten himself into something he couldn’t get out of. Perhaps it’s this quality that makes his performance in Ruben Östlund’s award winning film so magnetic, and has also raised comparisons to Jon Hamm and James Bond. At age 50, the Danish actor who has mostly worked on stage and television, finds himself in the unlikely position of movie star. Position which he’s filled extraordinarily, having become the sensation of the Cannes Film Festival, as well as a dark horse for the European Film Awards where he’s competing against Colin Farrell and Jean-Louis Trintignant for Best Actor.

Watching Bang (even his name’s cool!) in The Square one gets
See full article at FilmExperience »

November 28th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Misery Collector’s Edition, Super Dark Times, M.F.A., Creep 2

  • DailyDead
We may only have several home entertainment releases for this Tuesday, but as the saying goes, “quality over quantity,” because this bunch of Blu-rays and DVDs are a stellar lot of films. One of my favorite horror films of 2017, Mark DuplassCreep 2, makes its way home on November 28th courtesy of The Orchard, and Scream Factory has given Rob Reiner’s adaptation of Stephen King’s Misery the Collector’s Edition treatment (and deservedly so).

For you cult film fans, both Death Laid an Egg and Deathdream (aka Dead of Night) get the HD treatment this week, and other notable releases this Tuesday include M.F.A., Rememory, Super Dark Times, Woodshock, and Trailer Trauma 4: Television Trauma.

Creep 2 (The Orchard, DVD)

Sara, a video artist primarily focused on creating intimacy with lonely men, thinks she may have found the subject of her dreams after coming across a stranger’s online post.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch
Sony Pictures Classics has released the trailer for “Happy End,” Michael Haneke’s semi-sequel to “Amour.” Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant reprise their roles in the film, whose title is almost certainly ironic — Haneke’s movies, like “Funny Games” and “The White Ribbon,” are among the most severe in the world. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Happy End’ Review: In This Quasi-Sequel to ‘Amour,’ Michael Haneke is a Master of Bourgeois Despair

Here’s the synopsis, courtesy of AFI Fest: “The Laurent family has issues. Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), the aging patriarch of the wealthy Callais clan, is more interested in exiting this world than enjoying it. Anne (Isabelle Huppert) has a repellent adult son to deal with, and Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is having a graphic online affair. The match to this tinderbox of dysfunction is adolescent Eve, who moves in after her mother’s apparent suicide attempt, and in
See full article at Indiewire »

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…
Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael Haneke“All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”The Laurent Family in ‘Happy Ending’A snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family.

What is Michael Haneke’s vision in this film? We have seen his take on the young Adonises in Funny Games, the most devastating picture of modern sociopathology I have ever seen. And his view of the pathological origin of fascism in The White Ribbon, of the political scandal of the police mass murder and civilians turning a blind eye to the plight of Algerians in France in Cache, on sexual pathology run amock in The Piano Teacher.

Happy Ending features the best actors of a generation and of Haneke’s films, Isabelle Huppert (The Piano Teacher), Jean-Louis Trintignant who played the same character in Amour, is now shown from another angle,
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

U.S. Trailer for Michael Haneke’s ‘Happy End’ Brings the Family Together

Christmas just got a little warmer and fuzzier. Michael Haneke’s newest film, Happy End, will arrive just in time for a holiday family outing, if you’re in NY or La. Ahead of a release, Sony Classics have now debuted a new trailer. Starring Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Fantine Harduin, Franz Rogowski, Laura Verlinden, and Toby Jones, the film depicts the life of a bourgeois European family.

Happy End is a perplexing title for a movie by Michael Haneke, a filmmaker not exactly known for his irony whose endings have ranged from the death of all the central characters via murder and/or suicide (this has happened on four occasions) to the inception of Nazism,” we said in our review. “Lest anyone should suspect the redoubtable Austrian of growing soft, before the opening credits of Happy End have even finished rolling, a twelve-year-old has already killed her hamster and poisoned her mom,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Saddest Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amour’ to ‘Million Dollar Baby’
As much as we all love a stunning tracking shot or an impeccably stylized thriller, even the most discerning cinephiles have to admit: Sometimes, you just want a good cry. Often it’s the most gut-wrenching movies that remain in our collective cultural memory the longest; “Sophie’s Choice,” “Terms of Endearment,” and “Schindler’s List,” to name just a few. Even in an age when auteur-driven driven sci-fi and superhero franchises reign supreme, Hollywood will always love a good old-fashioned tearjerker. Which is why we thought it necessary to single out some of the saddest movies of the century — so far.

Read More:The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

Though it might sound trite, one doesn’t have to give up gorgeous cinematography or a tightly-wound script in order to be moved. Not only do the films on this list find beauty in the most heartbreaking of human experiences,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Happy End’ Trailer: Michael Haneke Takes Apart A Bourgeois Family

In all this talk about the awards season, how could we forget that we had a new movie from Michael Haneke on the way? Debuting this spring at the Cannes Film Festival, “Happy End” has been keeping a low profile, but a new trailer is here to remind you that you have yet another prestigious film to look forward to this fall.

Starring Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Fantine Harduin, Franz Rogowski, Laura Verlinden and Toby Jones, I could break down the plot in a bit more detail, but perhaps it’s best to give the official, very enigmatic synopsis:

Read More: ‘In The Fade’ Trailer: Diane Kruger Wants Justice

“All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”

A snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family.

Continue reading ‘Happy End’ Trailer: Michael Haneke Takes Apart A Bourgeois Family at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

2017 European Film Awards Nominations: ‘The Square,’ ‘Bpm,’ ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer,’ and More Lead the Way

  • Indiewire
2017 European Film Awards Nominations: ‘The Square,’ ‘Bpm,’ ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer,’ and More Lead the Way
The European Film Awards nominations have been released, with a number of festival favorites landing high-profile nods. Among them are “The Square” and “Bpm,” which were both nominated for Best European Film, and “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” which missed out on the top category but was recognized in the Director, Actor, and Screenwriter fields.

Read More:‘The Square’ Director Ruben Östlund Wants to Push Cultural Boundaries, But Won’t Read Any Scripts With Killing

This year’s ceremony, the 30th, takes place in Berlin on December 9. Here are all the nominees:

Best European Film

“Bpm (Beats per Minute),” (Robin Campillo, France)

Loveless,” (Andrey Zvyagintsev, Russia, Belgium, Germany, France)

“On Body and Soul,” (Ildiko Enyedi, Hungary)

The Other Side of Hope,” (Aki Kaurismaki, Finland, Germany)

The Square,” (Ruben Ostlund, Sweden, Germany, France, Denmark)

Best European Director

Ildiko Enyedi, (“On Body and Soul”)

Aki Kaurismaki, (“The Other Side of Hope”)

Yorgos Lanthimos,
See full article at Indiewire »
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