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Sicario 2 Day Of The Soldado – Review

Benicio Del Toro stars in Sicario: Day Of The Soldado. Photo By: Richard Foreman, Jr. Copyright: © 2018 Ctmg, Inc. All Rights Reserved. **All Images Are Property Of Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. For Promotional Use Only. Sale, Duplication Or Transfer Of This Material Is Strictly Prohibited.

“Sicario” means a hitman in Mexico, and the U.S.-Mexico border is the setting for the violent thriller Sicario 2 Day Of The Soldado. In the original 2015 film Sicario, a local policewoman played by Emily Blunt teams with a federal agent (Josh Brolin) and his hired Mexican hitman (Benicio Del Toro) to assassinate a Mexican drug lord, in an effort to gain control of the cartels. In Sicario 2 Day Of The Soldado, the federal government is worried that drug cartels’ new lucrative business, trafficking people illegally over the U.S.- Mexico border, now includes terrorists and Brolin and Del Toro take on a new mission
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Sicario 2: Soldado’ Review

Stars: Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Isabela Moner, Elijah Rodriguez, Catherine Keener, Matthew Modine | Written by Taylor Sheridan | Directed by Stefano Sollima

2015’s Sicario was the film that elevated its director Denis Villenueve and got him the Blade Runner gig. Relentlessly grim and sometimes frustratingly evasive, it might not have functioned brilliantly as an informative exploration of real-world tensions, but as an exercise in unbearable tension and greytone morality, it did the job. What it certainly didn’t do is cry out for a sequel. But three years later, here we are.

After opening titles which make it very clear this is not about economic migration but cartel-controlled trafficking, the film opens with a truly shocking suicide bombing in a Us supermarket – a scene which is wryly followed by Secretary of State James Riley (Matthew Modine) publicly stating that terrorism won’t terrify the American people.

Riley brings in Matt Graver
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Won’t Be a Blockbuster, But It’s Rewriting Movie Sequel History

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Won’t Be a Blockbuster, But It’s Rewriting Movie Sequel History
Like almost every other movie this summer, “Sicario: Day of the Soldado” is a sequel. However, it bears little resemblance to the onslaught of overgrown lizards, animated families, and Marvel brethren; it cost much less, and will gross much less. But what really sets “Soldado” apart is it was never meant to happen.

Sequels are as old as the movies. Comedy silent shorts often built on a continuing set of characters. Rudolph Valentino followed “The Sheik” with the even-bigger “Son of the Sheik.” Douglas Fairbanks went from “The Mark of Zorro” to “Don Q, Son of Zorro.”

In the early decades of sound, studios nurtured franchises that included The Thin Man (six titles), the Hardy Family (16 titles), Dr. Kildare and Ma and Pa Kettle (10 titles). Rarely, studios struck twice on a major success: 1944 Best Picture winner “Going My Way” immediately spawned the even-better “Bells of St. Mary’s,” and 1942 winner “Mrs. Miniver
See full article at Indiewire »

Second Opinion – Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018)

Sicario: Day of the Soldado, 2018.

Directed by Stefano Sollima.

Starring Benicio Del Toro, Josh Brolin, Isabela Moner, Jeffrey Donovan, Catherine Keener, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Matthew Modine, Shea Whigham, and Elijah Rodriguez.

Synopsis:

The drug war on the Us-Mexico border has escalated as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the Us border. To fight the war, federal agent Matt Graver re-teams with the mercurial Alejandro.

Stefano Sollima’s Sicario: Day of the Soldado is ruthless and cutthroat in ways that Denis Villeneuve’s Sicario wishes. An absolute stone-faced smoking gun of a conspiracy thriller that ups the original’s black-ops-tactical ferocity. Both are strategically precise and haunting beyond any military boogeyman’s wildest dreams, unflinching in their desire to acid-wash what it takes to keep bad men at bay (Taylor Sheridan’s scripted handiwork). The sacrifice. The dissociation. The collateral tragedies caught in the middle. Sicario was our bullet-to-the-head introduction, and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

“Sicario: Day of the Soldado” is an unlikely yet winning sequel

We certainly didn’t need a sequel to Sicario. That top notch procedural worked quite well as a stand alone movie. Luckily, despite Sicario: Day of the Soldado being unnecessary, it’s also way better than it has any right to be. Opening this week, the film isn’t the shot of near brilliance that the first one was, but it definitely works. Having screenwriter Taylor Sheridan return to pen this sequel is a big shot in the arm, as the flick doesn’t have star Emily Blunt, cinematographer Roger Deakins, composer Jóhann Jóhannsson, and director Denis Villeneuve back for more. That below the line touch is missing, but this is still a movie that entertains while making you think. The film is, obviously, a sequel to Sicario. The IMDb plot synopsis is as follows: “The drug war on the Us-Mexico border has escalated as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the Us border.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying

  • Variety
‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying
Early reviews are coming in for “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” the sequel to Denis Villeneuve’s 2015 crime thriller about a secret border drug war between the United States government and Mexican cartel. According to critics, Stefano Sollima’s “Day of the Soldado” ramps up the violence and tension as well as provides memorable performances from Benicio del Toro and Josh Brolin and proves itself to be a brutal-but-worthy entry in a new series of gritty modern western films, notching a 71% score on Rotten Tomatoes so far.

The first “Sicario” holds a 93% on Rotten Tomatoes and received three Academy Award nominations.

Variety’s Peter Debruge described “Day of the Soldado” as topical, given the recent controversies regarding the Trump administration’s border policies, but it’s not as though the film that will settle the debate surrounding the issue, saying, “Tense, tough, and shockingly ruthless at times, ‘Soldado’ doesn’t
See full article at Variety »

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’: Benicio Del Toro Says It’s Better Than The Doors’ First Album

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’: Benicio Del Toro Says It’s Better Than The Doors’ First Album
When Texas-born actor-turned-writer Taylor Sheridan broke out with “Sicario” (2015) and “Hell or High Water” (2016), he hoped that the two markedly original screenplays would wind up as a trilogy of “the modern-day American frontier,” he told me. “When I write a movie, I write it for me. I let characters be human and flawed and relatable. When we do things that aren’t that great, we can understand it.”

If “Wind River,” Sheridan’s 2017 directorial debut, was the third installment, then the next in the series arrives in theaters Friday: “Sicario: Day of the Soldado.” Columbia Pictures didn’t know quite what to expect when Sheridan handed in a finished script, written without studio input.

Sheridan said the first “Sicario” was “toxic” to financiers because, among other things, it had a female lead. “I wrote the Spanish dialogue without subtitles,” he said. “It was dark, the act structure didn’t make sense,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’: Benicio Del Toro Says It’s Better Than The Doors’ First Album

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’: Benicio Del Toro Says It’s Better Than The Doors’ First Album
When Texas-born actor-turned-writer Taylor Sheridan broke out with “Sicario” (2015) and “Hell or High Water” (2016), he hoped that the two markedly original screenplays would wind up as a trilogy of “the modern-day American frontier,” he told me. “When I write a movie, I write it for me. I let characters be human and flawed and relatable. When we do things that aren’t that great, we can understand it.”

If “Wind River,” Sheridan’s 2017 directorial debut, was the third installment, then the next in the series arrives in theaters Friday: “Sicario: Day of the Soldado.” Columbia Pictures didn’t know quite what to expect when Sheridan handed in a finished script, written without studio input.

Sheridan said the first “Sicario” was “toxic” to financiers because, among other things, it had a female lead. “I wrote the Spanish dialogue without subtitles,” he said. “It was dark, the act structure didn’t make sense,
See full article at Indiewire »

Playback: Josh Brolin on ‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado,’ ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ and ‘Deadpool 2’

  • Variety
Playback: Josh Brolin on ‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado,’ ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ and ‘Deadpool 2’
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Josh Brolin is having quite the moment. With marquee roles as the cosmic supervillain Thanos in “Avengers: Infinity War,” time-jumping cyborg soldier Cable in “Deadpool 2” and his first-ever reprise, as deep-state operative Matt Graver in “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” the Summer of Brolin is leaving the Oscar nominee feeling a touch exposed. But it’s the result of a career trajectory that has skyrocketed ever since the turning point of “No Country for Old Men” 11 years ago.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“This sounds so lame but I’m glad it’s happening now and not [when I was younger],” the 50-year-old star says of his success. “I just wouldn’t have dealt well. There
See full article at Variety »

15 Films to See in June

After wrapping up Cannes Film Festival, the summer season continues with one premiere from that festival, and much more. Including a few studio tentpoles that pique our interest, as well as other festival favorites finally hitting theaters, there’s something for everyone this month.

Matinees to See: Adrift (6/1), Hotel Artemis (6/8), Hearts Beat Loud (6/8), The Workers Cup (6/8), Gabriel and the Mountain (6/15), Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (6/22), The Catcher Was a Spy (6/22), Love, Cecil (6/29), The Cakemaker (6/29), and Woman Walks Ahead (6/29)

15. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (June 29)

Synopsis: The drug war on the Us-Mexico border has escalated as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the Us border. To fight the war, federal agent Matt Graver re-teams with the mercurial Alejandro.

Trailer

Why You Should See It: Without the creative contributions from Denis Villeneuve and Roger Deakins, one can’t quite shake the feeling that this Sicario follow-up might be better fitting as a straight-to-Netflix release.
See full article at The Film Stage »

New Trailer for ‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Brings Cartel-Fueled War

Now with a fresh new title, going from Sicario 2: Soldado to Sicario: Day of the Soldado, Sony is really hoping audiences think of the sequel to Denis Villeneuve’s crime thriller as an expansion and less of, well, a sequel. While Emily Blunt, Roger Deakins, and Villeneuve all steered clear of the follow-up, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro are back, as is writer Taylor Sheridan, and now a new trailer has landed.

Directed by Stefano Sollima (Suburra, the TV series version of Gomorrah) and shot by Ridley Scott’s frequent cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, the story has now been revealed with this new preview. “This is a man bent on revenge for what the cartels have done, killing his daughter and family. Now he finds himself on a new assignment,” Del Toro tells USA Today. “He has the chance for an eye for an eye, but sees a young
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Dark City’ 20th anniversary: The underrated sci-fi classic was released in 1998, but got no love from the Oscars

  • Gold Derby
‘Dark City’ 20th anniversary: The underrated sci-fi classic was released in 1998, but got no love from the Oscars
Dark City” was released on February 27, 1998, and it helped me fall in love with movies. It also sparked my interest in awards. During the same period I was wrestling with continued Emmy snubs for “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Dark City” made me wonder how the Oscars could miss the boat on what is still one of the most visually and narratively innovative films I’ve seen. So on its 20th anniversary I decided to revisit the underrated science-fiction gem, which deserved Oscars 20 years ago.

Dark City” was a unique amalgam of genres with elements of murder mystery, film noir, horror and sci-fi dystopia, using those tropes to examine human memory and how we construct and perform our identities. It was undoubtedly a tough sell for New Line Cinema, and even tougher when you consider that at the time “Titanic” was still swimming circles around other releases at the box office.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Best Cinematography Oscars Predictions

There are three likely nominations here in “Blade Runner,” “Shape of Water” and “Dunkirk.” The question is whether “Call Me By Your Name” and “Darkest Hour” round out the category or if “Mudbound” and another player knock them out. [Posted Jan. 2]

Frontrunners

Roger Deakins, “Blade Runner 2049

Bruno Delbonnel, “Darkest Hour

Dan Laustsen, “The Shape of Water

Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, “Call Me By Your Name

Hoyte van Hoytema, “Dunkirk

Almost there

Edward Lachman, “Wonderstruck

Philippe Le Sourd, “The Beguiled

Janusz Kamiński, “The Post

Rachel Morrison, “Mudbound

Dariusz Wolski, “All The Money In The World

Alexis Zabe, “The Florida Project”

Current predictions:

Best Picture

Best Actor

Best Actress

Best Supporting Actor

Best Supporting Actress

Director

Original Screenplay

Adapted Screenplay

Editing

Cinematography

Production Design

Original Score

Best Song

Costumes

Sound Mixing

Sound Editing

Documentary

Foreign Language Film

Animated Feature Film

Makeup and Hairstyling

Visual Effects

Continue reading 2018 Best Cinematography Oscars Predictions at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Ridley Scott defied the odds with “All the Money in the World”

With an embargo now lifted, let me express some real deference towards what Sir Ridley Scott was able to do with All the Money in the World at the 11th hour. His decision to recast a crucial role, essentially firing Kevin Spacey months after production had ended and replacing him with Christopher Plummer, mere weeks before release, seemed misguided at best and a disaster at worst. Yet, here we are, three Golden Globe nominations later. Having seen the film last week, I can vouch for it being pretty good. When you think about what Plummer and Scott pulled off at the last minute though, that helps to set it apart. The movie is a look at the infamous kidnapping of 16 year old John Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer) and the desperate attempt launched by his devoted mother Gail (Michelle Williams) to convince his billionaire grandfather Jean Paul Getty (Plummer) to
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

‘Sicario 2: Soldado’ Trailer: Josh Brolin & Benicio Del Toro Return to the Border

After Denis Villeneuve’s crime thriller Sicario a few years back became a hit, as Hollywood often decides to do, a “saga” has now been born. While Emily Blunt, Roger Deakins, and Villeneuve all steered clear of the sequel, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro are back, as is writer Taylor Sheridan, and the first trailer has landed for Sicario 2: Soldado. Directed by Stefano Sollima (Suburra, the TV series version of Gomorrah) and shot by Ridley Scott’s frequent cinematographer Dariusz Wolski, this time around it looks to lean heavier on the action front as it’s now positioned as a summer blockbuster, arriving in June.

“We learn from Alejandro in Sicario that he was a man who was motivated by revenge, right? And then in Soldado, he gets selected to a new assignment by John Brolin and then at some point he’s at a crossroads in that
See full article at The Film Stage »

Netflix hopes Brad Pitt’s star power will fuel their “War Machine”

Streaming services are really making their mark on the cinematic world. Between Amazon and Netflix, the film festival circuit has seen some big time buys from these would be studios. Netflix has gone a step further, funding some huge projects. One such movie is War Machine, a hugely baity satire that the service forked over heavy money to produce. Starring Brad Pitt and hitting on timely material, this really seemed like it would be an opportunity for the service to contend for some Oscars. Sadly, it isn’t up to snuff in that regard. Still, audiences might be interested in seeing Pitt don the fatigues once again. The film is a satire about military bureaucracy. Initially positioned to be about General Stanley McChrystal since it’s an adaptation of the non fiction book The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan, which is about the General.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

“Alien: Covenant” continues the slow march to summer blockbuster season

Say what you will about his final products, but Ridley Scott has spent quite a bit of time in the Alien world. From the aforementioned Alien to Prometheus, he has dabbled with xenomorphs more than anyone else. This week, he returns to the world once again with Alien: Covenant, a franchise outing that attempts to split the difference. It’s Scott trying to have his cake and eat it too. As you might have seen hinted over the past week or two by yours truly, I didn’t think it worked, but reviews so far have been divisive. Some love this flick, while others aren’t fans. In other words, it’s very much a Scott outing and a summer blockbuster. The film is both a sequel to Prometheus as well as a prequel to Alien. Here, we follow the crew of the colony ship Covenant. Filled with sleeping settlers
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Review: ‘Alien: Covenant’ is a Nihilistic Journey into Extraterrestrial Hell

The numerous financial forces that conspired to put Alien: Covenant on thousands and thousands of screens the world over have ensured that their investment will be sold, from the title on down, with more clarity and promise than its predecessor. Whereas 2012’s Prometheus was able to get by plenty well through mysterious marketing, a very rare is-it-or-is-it-not play with decades-old iconography, Covenant is being sold, in posters and trailers and TV spots, as everything you’d expect and just about nothing that would really raise any eyebrow. Except, of course, why the nearly octogenarian Ridley Scott, after having the opportunity to go balls-out weird with his flawed, sometimes majestic sci-fi epic, would commit such time and energy to what is, at first glance, clearly a retread.

Then you get a bit deeper into the thing — such as, say, actually seeing the movie, which I think counts for a lot — and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: Alien: Covenant is a Worthwhile Sequel, Even if it Ventures into Familiar Territory

For nearly 40 years now, audiences have been terrified by the cinematic universe Sir Ridley Scott first brought to life in his brilliant Alien. We have been enraptured by the Xenomorphs and all their iterations through three sequels, two Predator-inclusive offshoot films and Scott’s previous effort, Prometheus, which took us even further back to the events that happened prior to Alien. With Alien: Covenant, Ridley looks to start bridging the mythologies established in both films, and overall finds moderate success.

While I definitely enjoyed Covenant more than its direct predecessor, I do feel like this latest entry into the Alien franchise loses focus in its third act, giving us more of the same and nearly squandering some of the really great stuff that precedes it. Alien: Covenant also suffers from a lack of defined secondary characters and some not-so-awesome CG creatures, but Michael Fassbender delivers yet another brilliant performance that
See full article at DailyDead »

There’s a Script for a ‘Deadwood’ Film; Your Move, HBO

Will we ever get the closure we deserve?

The Deadwood movie is pretty much HBO’s version of Chinese Democracy. Fans of David Milch’s swear-laced western drama have been clamoring for a resolution to the series ever since it ended abruptly after its third season way back in 2006, and for years now producers and cast have kept this dream alive by teasing the idea of a feature film to wrap things up. But that’s all it’s really been, a tease. Seems like once a year there’s an obligatory update about how everyone’s still interested — cast, crew, creator and network — and a vague promise that any day now the ball will get rolling. Late last year we received the most promising news yet from series lead Ian MacShane, who reported that Milch was ready to write and the cast was prepping for returns to their roles. Great news
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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