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The Age of Innocence

Martin Scorsese commands the screen without a single profane word or gunshot to the head. His adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel is a marvel for its year, a highly entertaining, dramatically involving epic that takes us to a world lost to time, the high-toned society of New York in the 1870s. For adult viewers, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder form a stunning romantic triangle.

The Age of Innocence

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 913

1993 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 138 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 13, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder, Richard E. Grant, Alec McCowen, Geraldine Chaplin, Mary Beth Hurt, Stuart Wilson, Miriam Margolyes, Siàn Phillips, Carolyn Farina, Michael Gough, Alexis Smith, Norman Lloyd, Jonathan Pryce, Robert Sean Leonard, Joanne Woodward.

Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus

Film Editor: Thelma Schoonmaker

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Jay Cocks, Martin Scorsese

from the book by: Edith Wharton

Produced by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?
If our combined Oscar odds are correct, the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress categories will be dominated by the stars of three films: Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf of “Lady Bird”; Margot Robbie and Allison Janney of “I, Tonya”; and Sally Hawkins and Octavia Spencer of “The Shape of Water.” And if one pair of co-stars wins, it’d be the 11th time both actress awards went to the same film.

The best chance of this happening is with Ronan and Metcalf. The former sits in second place in lead, behind “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing Missouri” star Frances McDormand, with 7/2 odds, while her onscreen mother is the favorite in supporting with 11/5 odds.

But after defeating Metcalf at the Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice, Janney is watching her stock rise quickly. She stands at 5/2 odds, while her onscreen daughter, Robbie, is in fifth in lead with 8/1 odds.

See Will ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?

2018 Oscars:  All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”), Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water”), Meryl Streep (“The Post”) and Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) have long been our predicted Best Actress Oscar nominees. If they all make the cut, along with their films in Best Picture, they’d join a very exclusive club: It’d be first Best Actress slate in 40 years and just the fifth overall where everyone is in a film nominated for Best Picture.

The only other times this has occurred were for the film years 1934, 1939, 1940 and 1977 — but many of them come with caveats. In 1934, there were still only three acting nominees — winner Claudette Colbert (“It Happened One Night”), Grace Moore (“One Night of Love”) and Norma Shearer (“The Barretts of Wimpole Street”) — and 12 Best Picture nominees, before the academy standardized the categories to five each. This was also the infamous year of the write-in
See full article at Gold Derby »

114 days until Oscar

This season's Oscar ceremony, the Academy's 90th annual shindig, is on March 4th, 2018. Did you know that only two Oscar ceremonies have ever happened on a March 4th? Late February, Late March, and early April have been the most frequent time frames over the decades.

the acting winners of '42: Van Heflin, Greer Garson, James Cagney, and Teresa Wright

Both of the March 4th ceremonies were very early in Oscar history:The 1936 Oscars honoring The Great Ziegfeld (March 4th, 1937 at the Biltmore Hotel) and the 1942 Oscars honoring Mrs Miniver (March 4th, 1943 at the Cocoanut Grove in the Ambassador Hotel). I was delighted to realize that we've written about a few of the winners from those years in the past: the dance direction in The Great Ziegfeld,  My Gal Sal's Art Direction, Mrs Miniver as Best Picture, The Great Ziegfeld as Best Picture, and Black Swan's Cinematography. 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Review: ‘Breathe’ is an Unabashedly Old School Drama

From its opening aerial shots, to the stylized font used to announce its title, it’s pretty clear that Andy SerkisBreathe is a throwback to a kind of movie Hollywood specialized in a very long time ago: the inspirational melodrama based on a true story that once would’ve starred Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon. Breathe stars Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy as Robin and Diana Cavendish, respectively, the married couple who revolutionized the way in which the world saw people with disabilities. When we first meet them in the late 1950s, Robin is a bright eyed young man ready to conquer the world. He sets his eye on the beautiful Diana at a cricket game, and despite his friends suggesting she would never go for a guy like him, within the first ten minutes of the film they get married, she’s expecting a child, and he’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Barry Lyndon

Stanley Kubrick’s contribution to great cinema of the 1970s offers his vision of what an epic should be. Transported by images that recall great paintings of the period, and Kubrick’s new approaches to low-light cinematography, we witness a rogue’s progress through troubled times. And even Ryan O’Neal is good!

Barry Lyndon

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 897

1975 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 185 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee, Hardy Krüger, Steven Berkoff, Gay Hamilton, Marie Kean, Diana Körner, Murray Melvin, Frank Middlemass, André Morell, Arthur O’Sullivan, Godfrey Quigley, Leonard Rossiter, Philip Stone, Leon Vitali Leon Vitali, Wolf Kahler, Ferdy Mayne, George Sewell, Michael Hordern (narrator).

Cinematography: John Alcott

Editor: Tony Lawson

Production design: Ken Adam

Conductor & Musical Adaptor: Leonard Rosenman

Written by Stanley Kubrick from the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray

Produced and Directed by Stanley Kubrick

The
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Toronto: 'Breathe' Could Return Andrew Garfield to Oscars for Second Consecutive Year

Toronto: 'Breathe' Could Return Andrew Garfield to Oscars for Second Consecutive Year
Breathe, a film that once upon a time would have been called "a four-hanky picture" and starred Walter Pidgeon and Greer Garson, could return Andrew Garfield to the Oscars as a best actor nominee — just a year after he landed his first Oscar nomination, in that category, for Hacksaw Ridge — for playing another real-life hero. And it might bring The Crown's Claire Foy along for the ride, too, in the best actress or, more likely, best supporting actress category.

Andy Serkis' feature directorial debut, which chronicles the life of Robin Cavendish (Garfield) — a British man who was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month
Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Updated: Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. On Thursday night, TCM presented five Colman star vehicles that should be popping up again in the not-too-distant future: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a phenomenal central performance. Ah, it also shows its star without his trademark mustache – about as famous at the time as Clark Gable's. Perhaps
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Film Review: ‘Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge’

Film Review: ‘Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge’
Saddled with an English-language title that evokes a dust-caked educational video for classroom use only, “Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge” doesn’t have to clear a very high bar to be more entertaining than it sounds — and so it does, albeit none too smoothly. Instead, Marie Noelle’s evidently impassioned portrait of the trailblazing Polish-French physicist and chemist emerges as an odd blend of, well, formulae, following a starchy biopic pattern one minute and giving in to impressionistic abstraction the next. Neither approach does much to make the subject’s monumental scientific achievements pop dramatically, which was always going to be a tall order. That her love life is rather more engagingly presented is perhaps inevitable, though having fought hard to be judged by male peers on her work rather than her womanhood, Curie wouldn’t be thrilled to hear it.

“We should be less curious to know people, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

On this day: Vivien's Oscar, Kevin's Bacon, Carter's Write-Down

On this day in showbiz history

The Story of Miss Lonelyheart from Péter Lichter on Vimeo.

1913/1914 Did you know that Detective Doyle (Wendell Corey) and Miss Lonelyhearts (Judith Evelyn) from Rear Window shared a birthday? Now you do! (Uff, I love Rear Window so much)

1942 Rings on Her Finger, a screwball comedy starring Henry Fonda and Gene Tierney opens in theaters

1948 Gentleman's Agreement wins Best Picture at the 1947 Oscars but the enduring statues from that year are surely Edmund Gwenn's Supporting Actor win as Kris Kringle in Miracle on 34th Street and the Cinematography and Art Direction wins for the astounding Black Narcissus. What a picture! 

1952 Vivien Leigh wins her second Best Actress prize at the 1951 Oscars for A Streetcar Named Desire. Absent from the ceremony, Greer Garson accepts for Vivien...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Longtime Voice Actress Russi Taylor on Playing Minnie Mouse and Falling for Mickey in Real Life

Longtime Voice Actress Russi Taylor on Playing Minnie Mouse and Falling for Mickey in Real Life
You may not recognize her walking down the street, but Russi Taylor plays one of the most famous characters in the world.

Taylor has been the voice of Minnie Mouse for more than 30 years, and that’s just a fraction of voice work she’s done in her long career. She’s played Huey, Dewey, and Louie in various Disney projects, Pebbles Flintstone in “The Flintstone Comedy Show,” Pac-Baby in the “Pac-Man” TV series, “Penny Tompkins” in “The Critic,” Baby Gonzo in “Muppet Babies,” and various characters over 17 years on “The Simpsons,” among too many others to count.

She’s currently working on Disney Television Animation’s new series “Mickey and the Roadster Racers,” which brings together all of Disney’s classic characters: Mickey, Minnie, Goofy, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, and Pluto. In “Racers,” Minnie and Daisy exemplify female empowerment as they run a business called Happy Helpers. It airs Fridays on the Disney Channel.

Taylor
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Angela Lansbury Remembers Robert Osborne: "He Was the Ultimate Fan — and the Ultimate Friend"

We in the world of motion pictures have lost a very dear friend. Through Turner Classic Movies, Robert Osborne brought to the attention of a vast audience the work of hundreds of actors and actresses who otherwise would never have been seen in their signature roles. I count myself among them.

I first knew Robert when he was a handsome young actor in the '50s. I was awed by his friendships at that time with the most glamorous of the great female stars of the day, including Joan Crawford, Greer Garson and Bette Davis. There was something about Robert that...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Angela Lansbury Remembers Robert Osborne: "He Was the Ultimate Fan — and the Ultimate Friend"

Angela Lansbury Remembers Robert Osborne:
We in the world of motion pictures have lost a very dear friend. Through Turner Classic Movies, Robert Osborne brought to the attention of a vast audience the work of hundreds of actors and actresses who otherwise would never have been seen in their signature roles. I count myself among them.

I first knew Robert when he was a handsome young actor in the '50s. I was awed by his friendships at that time with the most glamorous of the great female stars of the day, including Joan Crawford, Greer Garson and Bette Davis. There was something about Robert that...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Oscars 2017: Nicole Kidman Poised to Score Fourth Nom With ‘Lion’ — But How Rare Is This Achievement?

Nicole Kidman in ‘Lion’ (Courtesy: Mark Rogers/Long Way Productions)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Nothing is ever certain when it comes to predicting how the Oscars will shape up, but it seems as though Nicole Kidman is a slam dunk in this year’s race. The Lion star has already been nominated three times in the past — even snagging one win in the process — across categories and it seems as though a fourth is on the way. How often does this happen in the best actress and best supporting actress categories?

The reason a fourth nomination for Kidman seems inevitable is because the 49-year-old Australian-American has been nominated for a Critics’ Choice Award and a Satellite Award (losing both) as well as a Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award (awaiting results). With those in the bag, an Oscar nomination is right around the corner — and this site’s namesake,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Amy Adams Is Always a Nominee and Never a Winner at the Oscars — Will That Ever Change?

Arrival’ (Courtesy: Jan Thijs/Paramount Pictures)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

You might be surprised that one of today’s biggest actresses, Amy Adams, has never won an Oscar. Despite being nominated five times in the timespan of a decade, the 42-year-old has been denied in both the best actress and best supporting actress categories — but is she alone among her peers when looking at history?

The talented redhead was nominated for best supporting actress four times — for Junebug (2005), Doubt (2008), The Fighter (2010), and The Master (2013) — before snagging a best actress nomination for American Hustle (2014). This year, Adams is considered by Scott Feinberg to be a major threat for the best actress category this year thanks to her work in Arrival (though Nocturnal Animals could garner attention, too).

Over the course of Oscar history, there have been exactly a dozen other actresses who — between the best actress and best supporting actress
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Producer Jud Kinberg, Father of Simon Kinberg, Dies at 91

Producer Jud Kinberg, Father of Simon Kinberg, Dies at 91
Jud Kinberg, father of Simon Kinberg and a producer of “Lust for Life” and “The Collector,” died on Nov. 2 at his home in New York City, according to a rep for his son. He was 91.

Kinberg was a Brooklyn native who attended the University of North Carolina. He served with the U.S Army in World War II and was awarded a Purple Heart and a Silver Star.

Kinberg began working in Hollywood under John Houseman, collaborating with him on films for MGM including “Julius Caesar,” starring Marlon Brando; “Executive Suite,” starring William Holden; “Her Twelve Men,” with Greer Garson and Robert Ryan; Vincente Minnelli’s “The Cobweb,” with Richard Widmark and Lauren Bacall; and “Lust for Life,” starring Kirk Douglas as Vincent Van Gogh.

Kinberg also produced the British psychological thriller “The Collector,” directed by William Wyler, and “The Magus,” starring Michael Caine.

Kinberg also worked for ABC, Embassy,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

On This Day: Marie Curie, Steve McQueen, Bush v Gore

On this day in showbiz history... 

15 Agrippina the Younger, the sister of the infamous Caligula and wife of Claudius is born. She's been played in movies for film and television by actresses like Barbara Young (I Claudius), Lori Wagner (Caligula), and Ava Gardner (A.D.) among others

1867 Pioneering physicist Marie Curie is born in Poland. 76 years later her biopic Madame Curie is nominated for 7 Oscars including Best Picture and Best Actress (Greer Garson). It's worth noting that there's a new Polish biopic about her life opening next month in Europe starring Karolina Gruszka 

1874 Political cartoonist Thomas Nast first uses the elephant to symbolize the Republican party in an illustration...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Greer Garson, Peter Finch, Zoolander, and more...

1916 Happy Centennial to Best Actor winner Peter Finch (Network), one of only two posthumous acting winners in Oscar history. The other is Heath Ledger. (Curiously they were both Australian)

1924 Marcello Mastroianni (La Dolce Vita, 8½) is born in Italy. Becomes one of the all time great movie stars by his mid 30s. His career spans over 50 years of cinema.

1933 Greer Garson weds Edward Snelson, first of three husbands, though the cohabitation is brief. Ten years later she famously marries her screen son in Mrs Miniver.

1934 ...And God Created Brigitte Bardot in Paris

1945 Mildred Pierce opens. Joan Crawford will win Best Actress for this fabulous noir melodrama

1949 Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis first film together My Friend Irma

1950 American indie icon John Sayles is born in New York. Among his most famous films: Return of the Secaucus 7, Passion Fish, and Lone Star

1951 Franchot Tone marries Barbara Payton, his third wife, a disastrous marriage for both.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Judy by the Numbers: "A Great Lady Has An Interview"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Our time travelling comes to an end this week with a movie that was filmed before The Harvey Girls but, due to expensive reshoots, wasn't released until months later. Ziegfeld Follies (not to be confused with Ziegfeld Girl) is a plotless series of excuses for MGM to throw its considerable stable of talent into a series of comic and musical sketches tailor made to show off the stars - and the studio - at their finest.

 

The Movie: Ziegfeld Follies (1946)

The Songwriters: Kay Thompson (lyrics), Roger Edens (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, William Powell, Esther Williams, directed by Vincente Minnelli 

The Story: According to rumor, originally this enjoyable little slip of a number was designed for Greer Garson. However, when Garson backed out, it became a number about Garson, lampooning her accent, image, and Oscar-bait dramatic roles.
See full article at FilmExperience »
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