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Doctor Who: Revisiting Steven Moffat’s Christmas Specials

Mark Harrison Dec 17, 2018

Matt Smith and Peter Capaldi starred in four Doctor Who Christmas specials each. We revisit Steven Moffat's festive scripts...

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

Steven Moffat’s first Christmas-y contribution to Doctor Who comes near the end of his second episode, The Doctor Dances, when Rose Tyler compares a jolly Doctor to Santa Claus. “Who says I’m not, red bicycle when you were 12?” comes the cheeky reply.

Comparisons between the Doctor and Father Christmas go all the way back to Moffat’s Comic Relief sketch The Curse Of Fatal Death and continue all the way throughout his tenure as head writer and executive producer, particularly in his seasonal specials. Having inherited the tradition, he upheld it very well.

Like Russell T. Davies before him, Moffat didn’t treat the Christmas special as a trifle or a passing fancy, but as a proper episode of Doctor Who.
See full article at Den of Geek »

A Merry GeekTyrant Christmas: Staff Holiday Movie Picks

With the holiday season in full effect and Christmas right around the corner, I took it upon myself to bug the GeekTyrant staff about their favorite holiday movies. While we often spend the year watching and reading up on comic book, fantasy, and sci-fi movies, when December rolls around we make time for some more wholesome holiday classics. And even if they’re not classics, per se, they still put us in the Christmas spirit. And before you get disappointed, none of us chose Die Hard. Admittedly, I considered it, but isn’t that whole thing played out already?

Joey Paur, Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief

“I've watched A Christmas Story every year during Christmas for as long as I can remember, and I've never gotten bored or tired of it. Every time I watch it, I still laugh at the wonderfully comedic scenes. Over the years it's connected with me in different ways.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Doctor Who: Revisiting Russell T. Davies’ Christmas Specials

Mark Harrison Dec 12, 2018

With Doctor Who's festive episode moving to New Year's Day, we look back at the show's previous Christmas specials...

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

Twenty-eighteen marks the end of a modern festive tradition, as Doctor Who swaps its Christmas special for a New Year’s Day edition instead. Up until now, we’ve only had one Doctor Who story that dealt with the New Year and that was the 1996 TV movie, which premiered on BBC One in May!

On the other hand, there's an entire season’s worth of Christmas specials to watch and while it’s ridiculous to suggest that the show has simply run out of festive ideas, the change might be friendlier for binge-watching in, say, July, when you don’t have an adventure with killer Santas or wintry vistas every 13 episodes or so.

Even if some of us will miss
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Doctor Who’ Season 11 Review: Standalone Episodes Failed the 13th Doctor

‘Doctor Who’ Season 11 Review: Standalone Episodes Failed the 13th Doctor
[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Doctor Who” Season 11, including the season finale, “The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos.”]

The season finale of “Doctor Who” began the way many episodes of the long-running British series do — the Doctor (Jodie Whittaker) and her faithful companions stepped onto an alien vista after receiving an alert that something strange was afoot. It ended the way many episodes do, as well — the Doctor and her friends returning to the Tardis, ready for another adventure.

And that’s perhaps the biggest disappointment of “The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos,” one that represents the flaws of the season as a whole. Billed as a grand conclusion and featuring a heroic moment for the Doctor as she and her friends stop a giant planet-killing beam from destroying the Earth, the episode tied up exactly one loose plot thread — and offered little other catharsis.

This isn’t really the last episode of the season,
See full article at Indiewire »

Bww Review: John Kevin Jones Returns To Merchant's House Museum For Warm and Intimate A Christmas Carol

For the past five holiday seasons in a row, savvy New York playgoers have been filling the upstairs parlor of East 4th Street's Merchant's House Museum for a warm and intimate evening of Christmas cheer Summoners Ensemble Theatre's delightful production of actor John Kevin Jones recreating Charles Dickens' solo readings of A Christmas Carol. Their 2018 engagement is the third time this reviewer has attended, and Jones' thoroughly engaging performance keeps getting better and better.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

“TCM’S Christmas In The Movies” by Jeremy Arnold (Turner Classic Movies/Running Press)

  • CinemaRetro
“Mistletoe And Movies”

By Raymond Benson

Another handsome, beautifully-illustrated, and affordable entry in Turner Classic Movies’ series of books on film history, genres, and trivia, comes just in time for the holidays. Christmas in the Movies—30 Classics to Celebrate the Season offers a selection of excellent choices in chronological order. Author Arnold, a film historian and TCM commentator, provides enough background, offscreen anecdotes, and justification for his picks to satisfy the most critical movie buff.

Christmas in the Movies manages to tick all the obvious suspects, but Arnold also throws a spotlight on some lesser-known gems such as Remember the Night (1940), with a screenplay by Preston Sturges—although I’d haggle that the Sturges’-helmed piece, Christmas in July (also 1940) might be a better option. Other worthy entries include The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), 3 Godfathers, The Lion in Winter (1968—Christmas in medieval England with Henry II and Eleanor!
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Van Helsing Season 3 Episode 10 Review: Outside World

As she hangs helplessly on a steel hook, Vanessa confronts pent up guilt and temptation on an introspective Van Helsing.

TV

This Van Helsing review contains spoilers.

Van Helsing Season 3 Episode 10

“As if I’d leave you on your own.”

It’s difficult to watch “Outside World” and not draw comparisons to Charles DickensA Christmas Carol and Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ as Vanessa confronts ghosts from her past and questions the path she’s chosen. Tonight, Van Helsing gives viewers priority seating for a haunting psychological examination of the choices Vanessa’s made to this point, and with her mind and conscience now reasonably clear, she sets off alone to bring the darkness inside of her and in the world to a close. Well, not quite alone.

Writer/director Jackie May frames the episode with images of Vanessa walking alone down a brightly lit wooded
See full article at Den of Geek »

Something electric by Jennie Kermode

Barbara Crampton plays an actress whose daughter - thought dead - returns to complicate her life in Reborn

In the early part of the century, director Julian Richards made a big splash with films like Silent Cry and The Last Horror Movie. His was a distinctive voice and fans were eager to see what he would do next, but after 2007’s Summer Scars and a 2009 documentary about Charles Dickens, he disappeared from the radar. This year saw him return with two very different horror films, Daddy’s Girl and Reborn. I caught up with him after Halloween Frightfest, which screened the latter, to ask where he’s been all this time.

“It’s generally because it does take a while to develop a project with things like getting finance and getting it into production,” he explains. ”It often takes three or four years to go through that whole process and
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Bww Exclusive: What Makes A Christmas Carol the Story of the Holiday Season? Theatres Around the Country Explain!

By the time December hits and oftentimes well before, it's impossible to browse theatre listings without running across half a dozen productions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. But what makes it so long lasting We reached out to companies across the Us and more to find out just what makes A Christmas Carol the anthem for the holiday season.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Golden Globes’ 10 Most Ludicrous Comedy or Musical Picks, From ‘Get Out’ to ‘Green Book’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Golden Globes’ 10 Most Ludicrous Comedy or Musical Picks, From ‘Get Out’ to ‘Green Book’ (Photos)
Green Book” has been nominated for a Golden Globe in the “Musical or Comedy” category for Best Picture. While eating Kentucky Fried Chicken in a car may seem funny to some, the based-on-a-true-story road trip is more a light-hearted drama than anything else. But this isn’t the only time that a movie strategically played category fraud to get a nomination. Here are 10 other instances that raise an eyebrow:

The Tourist” (2010)

How can we invite Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp to the awards ceremony? Let’s nominate this romantic, action caper with a 20 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and stick it in the Musical or Comedy category!

The Martian” (2015)

“In your face, Neil Armstrong!” That line of dialogue is just about all it takes to be considered a comedy it seems. And it won!

My Week With Marilyn” (2011)

Maybe someone will make a movie worthy of a Golden Globe that celebrates
See full article at The Wrap »

Quiz: Are you a festive film fanatic?

So, you fancy yourself as a bit of an authority on Christmas cinema … but do you know your Elf from your Snowman? Or how Gonzo, Kermit et al line up in the Muppet Christmas Carol? Test yourself with this fun festive quiz

What is the first booby trap “wet bandits” Harry and Marv encounter when they try to gain entry to the McCallister residence in Home Alone?

They both get shot with a Bb gun

Marv stands on glass Christmas ornaments after climbing through the window

Harry burns his hand on the front door knob

They both slip on the frozen stairs

Who plays Charles Dickens in the Muppet Christmas Carol?

Fozzie Bear

Kermit the Frog

Gonzo

Miss Piggy

In the film Elf, what is Buddy’s job growing up in the north pole?

Looking after reindeer

Toy testing

Wrapping up presents

Making the tea

The Polar Express was based
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Heather Wixson and Scott Drebit Discuss Scrooged on a New Corpse Club Member-Exclusive Bonus Episode

  • DailyDead
As a special seasonal treat for those in our Corpse Club membership system, Heather Wixson and Scott Drebit celebrate the imaginative and spooky 1988 Christmas movie Scrooged (which can be viewed as a horror film as well as a comedy) on a new bonus episode!

Although it's widely considered a Christmas comedy, there are many horror elements to be unwrapped in Scrooged, starring Bill Murray. With that in mind, Heather and Scott embrace the supernatural side of the season by discussing Richard Donner's 1988 adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic Christmas story, including Murray's unforgettable performance as Frank Cross, the eerie elevator scene that continues to stuff stockings with nightmare fuel, the film's fright-filled take on the holiday season, and much more!

So, grab a cup of hot cocoa, throw another log on the fire, and relax with a new bonus episode of Daily Dead’s official podcast!

There's more bonus content to come.
See full article at DailyDead »

Alfonso Cuaron movies: All 8 films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Alfonso Cuaron movies: All 8 films ranked worst to best
Alfonso Cuaron celebrates his 57th birthday on November 28, 2018. The Oscar-winning director could find himself back in the awards race this year with his latest work, “Roma.” But how does this one rank with the rest of his filmography? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all eight of Cuaron’s movies, ranked worst to best.

Born in Mexico City in 1961, Cuaron made his directorial debut when he was just 30-years-old with the Spanish-language farce “Solo con Tu Pareja” (1991). He was soon drafted by Hollywood to helm the children’s film “A Little Princess” (1995) and the modern day Charles Dickens adaptation “Great Expectations” (1998).

It was with “Y Tu Mama Tambien” (2001), a sexy road trip comedy shot in Mexico, that Cuaron reaped his first Oscar nomination in Best Original Screenplay. He returned to America shortly thereafter to direct the third installment in the “Harry Potter” franchise, “The
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alfonso Cuaron movies: All 8 films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Roma,’ ‘Gravity,’ ‘Children of Men’

  • Gold Derby
Alfonso Cuaron movies: All 8 films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Roma,’ ‘Gravity,’ ‘Children of Men’
Alfonso Cuaron celebrates his 57th birthday on November 28, 2018. The Oscar-winning director could find himself back in the awards race this year with his latest work, “Roma.” But how does this one rank with the rest of his filmography? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all eight of Cuaron’s movies, ranked worst to best.

Born in Mexico City in 1961, Cuaron made his directorial debut when he was just 30-years-old with the Spanish-language farce “Solo con Tu Pareja” (1991). He was soon drafted by Hollywood to helm the children’s film “A Little Princess” (1995) and the modern day Charles Dickens adaptation “Great Expectations” (1998).

See‘Roma’ trailer: Will it make Oscar history for Netflix and Latin American film? [Watch]

It was with “Y Tu Mama Tambien” (2001), a sexy road trip comedy shot in Mexico, that Cuaron reaped his first Oscar nomination in Best Original Screenplay. He returned to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Everyone’s Favorite Sherlock to Play Everyone’s Favorite Miser

As the days get longer, The Film Detective invites classic film fans out of the cold and into their living rooms to the kickoff of its second annual “25 Days of Christmas” program schedule. From iconic holiday classic films like Frank Capra’s Meet John Doe (1941) starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck to cult favorites Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964) and the newly restored Mexican fantasy film Santa Claus (1959), there is something to watch on everyone’s Christmas list. Get the holiday shopping out of the way by Friday, Dec. 21, as The Film Detective will be streaming vintage cartoons like Max Fleischer’s original Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer(1948) and Jack Frost (1934) all weekend long.

This year, classic television fans will be delighted to find six new Christmas episodes from shows like “Date with Angels” (1957) starring Betty White and “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet” (1956). A handful of last year’s favorites will also return,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Guillermo del Toro Lists All of His Completed Unproduced Screenplays

Over the years, director Guillermo del Toro has been attached to several projects that never saw the light of day. A lot of these projects came and went and the fans have been excited about a lot of them.

Del Toro recently took to Twitter to share a list of all of the completed unproduced screenplays that he worked on and shared his feelings on how these scripts represent more than a decade of work that he put into developing them and how all of that work is now lost.

It’s actually pretty sad to see all of these exciting projects currently dead or in limbo. Of course, this is just a fraction of the kinds of film projects that have been lost in Hollywood over the years. Every filmmaker has projects they wanted to make that never got the greenlight.

Check out Del Toro’s tweets below:

1/2 Screenplays I have developed,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

From Trading Places to The Princess Switch – why are there so many Christmas life-swap movies?

Role-reversal films have become a Christmas tradition … but does Netflix’s latest effort show the genre has finally had its day?

At last, Christmastide is upon us, for it is decreed that it may only commence when Netflix drops its worst festive movie – and, as last week saw the release of The Princess Switch, it is now Ok to start decking the halls. The film stars Vanessa Hudgens as Stacy De Novo (just a normal baker from Chicago) and Lady Margaret Delacourt, Duchess of Montenaro (just go with it), who swap identities for a bit, just to see. Seasonal shenanigans of course ensue.

The most notable thing about The Princess Switch, which is otherwise hilariously unChristmassy in spirit, is the way it plays on ye olde Christmas tradition of the switcheroo, as pioneered by Charles Dickens and subsequently elevated to art form by, erm, Nancy MeyersThe Holiday. Of course,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Cast of 'Scrooged,' Then and Now

The Cast of 'Scrooged,' Then and Now
Deck the halls — Scrooged, the holiday classic starring Bill Murray, turns 30 this month. And Murray isn't the only actor who continued an illustrious career years after the workplace take on Charles Dickens' Christmas tale premiered Nov. 23, 1988.

With its initial release, Scrooged scored more than $60 million at the U.S. box office and a 1989 Oscar nomination for makeup. From overworked executives to ghosts of Christmas past, the dark comedy's cast features Murray, Karen Allen, John Forsythe, Bobcat Goldthwait, Robert Mitchum, Alfre Woodard and more.

In the spirit of the holiday season and the film's ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Giveaway: Win a Copy of Scrooged on Blu-ray!

Spencer Mullen Nov 23, 2018

We're giving away three Blu-ray copies of the Bill Murray classic Scrooged (along with a rare ornament) in time for the holidays!

Just in time for the holidays, we're giving away three Blu-ray copies of the 1988 Bill Murray classic Scrooged for the movie's 30th anniversary! Featuring an all-star cast including Karen Allen, John Forsythe, Bobcat Goldthwait, Carol Kane, Robert Mitchum, and Alfre Woodard, the perennial holiday favorite is more uproarious and touching than ever. Each lucky winner will also receive an ornament that goes along perfectly with the film!

From the home release's synopsis...

"Frank Cross (Murray) is an uncaring, and unforgiving television executive whose live production of ‘A Christmas Carol’ is more important than any true meaning of Christmas. Before the night is over, he'll take a hilarious journey through his past and into the future to find redemption and put a little love in his heart.
See full article at Den of Geek »

17 Times You Nailed Creepy Male Behvior

Unfortunately, if you identify as female in this day and age, you have probably experienced unwanted, entitled, or just plain uncomfortable male behavior at least once in your life.

Lifetime's You, based on the book series by Caroline Kepnes, might be a slightly dramatized version of that, but it still hits close to home on many fronts.

Related: You Season 1 Episode 6 Review: Amour Fou

Joe Goldberg, played with velvety smooth creepiness by Penn Badgley, may look like the innocent loner on the outside, but beneath those glass-cut cheekbones beats the heart of an unhinged stalker.

Only six episodes in and Joe has displayed some uncomfortably familiar traits, all of which are instantly recognizable to a female viewer. Here are the 17 times Lifetime's You nailed creepy male behavior. 

1. When Joe Watched Beck Getting Dressed Through Her Window When you live in a city, you Always need curtains for your bedroom. Unfortunately,
See full article at TVfanatic »
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