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Divided Oscar Loyalties: Who Do They Really Want to Win the Gold?

Decisions, decisions: Academy Awards voters have plenty of worthy nominees to choose from as they mark their ballots in the final stretch of a particularly competitive Oscar season.

But what about those voters who struggle with divided loyalties? There are a handful every year: those who, in fact, have strong ties to more than one of the nominees. On the macro level, the spotlight would probably be on Focus Features and Fox Searchlight Pictures, which each have two films in the thick of the hunt for the best picture prize.

Searchlight has Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” and Martin McDonagh’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” both of which emerged from the Telluride-Toronto-New York fall-festival nexus. Focus’ “Darkest Hour” and year-end entry “Phantom Thread” claim two more of the positions in competition. That sound you hear is the barely suppressed glee of parents who each have two children in solid contention for the top
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86
John Gavin, who reached the pinnacle of his acting career with roles in Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” and the epic “Spartacus,” later serving as president of the Screen Actors Guild in the early ’70s and as U.S. ambassador to Mexico under Ronald Reagan, died Friday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 86.

The actor was signed to a contract and almost played James Bond in the film “Diamonds Are Forever.”

Gavin was SAG president from 1971-73 and was President Reagan’s first ambassador to Mexico from 1981-86.

His two films with German-born director Douglas Sirk in the late 1950s, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” and “Imitation of Life,” greatly raised his profile in Hollywood and around the country.

Shot in black-and-white CinemaScope, and adapted from the novel by “All Quiet on the Western Front” author Erich Maria Remarque, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” (1958) was the first
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86
John Gavin, who reached the pinnacle of his acting career with roles in Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” and the epic “Spartacus,” later serving as president of the Screen Actors Guild in the early ’70s and as U.S. ambassador to Mexico under Ronald Reagan, died Friday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 86.

The actor was signed to a contract and almost played James Bond in the film “Diamonds Are Forever.”

Gavin was SAG president from 1971-73 and as President Reagan’s first ambassador to Mexico from 1981-86.

Gavin made two films with German-born director Douglas Sirk in the late 1950s, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” and “Imitation of Life,” that greatly raised his profile in Hollywood and around the country.

Shot in black-and-white CinemaScope, and adapted from the novel by “All Quiet on the Western Front” author Erich Maria Remarque, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” (1958) was
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Leisure Seeker Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Leisure Seeker Movie Review
The Leisure Seeker Sony Pictures Classics Director: Paolo Virzi Screenwriter: Stephen Amidon, Francesca Archibugi, Francesto Piccolo, Paolo Virzi based on Michael Zadoorian’s book Cast: Helen Mirren, Donald Sutherland, Christian McKay, Janel Moloney, Dana Ivey, Dick Gregory Screened at: Critics’ DVD, NYC, 11/24/17 Opens: In December for awards consideration. January 18, 2018 Maurice Chevalier once said […]

The post The Leisure Seeker Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

20 Little-Known Facts About Anastasia on the Movie's 20th Anniversary

Image Source: Everett Collection If you grew up in the '90s, there's a good chance Anastasia is one of your favorite animated movies. It might not be a product of the Mouse House, but Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia might as well be up there with iconic Disney princesses like Cinderella, Belle, and Ariel. In honor of the feel-good movie's 20th anniversary - it first hit theaters on Nov. 21, 1997 - let's take a look at a few little-known facts that might surprise even the most diehard Dimitri fans. RelatedPrepare to Sing Along Embarrassingly Loud to the Anastasia Musical's "Journey to the Past" So, like we said, it isn't a Disney movie. Although the animation is reminiscent of Disney favorites like The Little Mermaid and Aladdin, Anastasia actually hails from 20th Century Fox. With Disney in the running to buy part of Fox, however, she might end up a
See full article at BuzzSugar »

TCM Remembers Lovely and Talented Brunette of Studio Era

Frances Dee movies: From 'An American Tragedy' to 'Four Faces West' Frances Dee began her film career at the dawn of the sound era, going from extra to leading lady within a matter of months. Her rapid ascencion came about thanks to Maurice Chevalier, who got her as his romantic interested in Ludwig Berger's 1930 romantic comedy Playboy of Paris. Despite her dark(-haired) good looks and pleasant personality, Dee's Hollywood career never quite progressed to major – or even moderate – stardom. But she was to remain a busy leading lady for about 15 years. Tonight, Turner Classic Movies is showing seven Frances Dee films, ranging from heavy dramas to Westerns. Unfortunately missing is one of Dee's most curious efforts, the raunchy pre-Coder Blood Money, which possibly features her most unusual – and most effective – performance. Having said that, William A. Wellman's Love Is a Racket is a worthwhile subsitute, though the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part One: Silliness

This is my seventh TCM Classic Film Festival. At a certain point, some things become routine – one learns to expect the exhaustion at the dawn of day three (of four), the constant negotiation between personal viewing whims and rare presentations, the way plots and aesthetic choices start to run together, and the suspicion that explaining the draw of such an event to those not immediately inclined to attend it may come across a touch insane. Film festivals are innately demanding experiences, but between the pleasure of its programming, the consolidation of the venues, and the brevity of most of its films’ running times, few make it so easy to watch four, five, six movies in a day. You tell your coworkers on Monday what you did all weekend, and it starts to not make a lot of sense. But somehow, in the midst of it all, the point of it couldn’t be clearer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Love in the Afternoon

Love in the Afternoon

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Gary Cooper, Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier, John McGiver, Van Doude, Lise Bourdin, Louis Jourdan, Betty Schneider.

Cinematography: William C. Mellor

Film Editor: Leonid Azar

Art Direction: Alexandre Trauner

Adapted Music: Franz Waxman

Written by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond from a novel by Claude Anet

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

A favorite of Billy Wilder-philes, Love in the Afternoon is a strong expression of the ‘romantic-Lubitsch’ vein in Wilder’s work. It’s essentially a return to the early ’30s Lubitsch comedies with Maurice Chevalier, but played in a more bittersweet Viennese register. It’s also Wilder’s first collaboration with the comedy screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond. Together they fashion the predominantly verbal comedy machine that will carry them through three or four big hits, and a few losers that have become classics anyway.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Meryl Streep Nominated the Same Year She’s to Receive Cecil B DeMille Award -- a First in Over Two Decades!

Meryl Streep Nominated the Same Year She’s to Receive Cecil B DeMille Award -- a First in Over Two Decades!
Meryl Streep is undoubtedly the finest actress of her generation.

In addition to the Cecil B. DeMille Award, it was announced that Streep is nominated for her 30th Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical in Florence Foster Jenkins.

In addition to furthering her record as the most nominated person at the Golden Globes with 30 nominations, Streep is the first person since Sophia Loren to be nominated the same year as receiving the Cecil B. DeMille Award.

Golden Globes: 2017 Nominations Revealed

Loren, who was the recipient of the honorary award in 1995, was also nominated for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture for Ready to Wear. The only other two people do the same are Judy Garland (1962) and Maurice Chevalier (1959). However, no one has won both in the same night.

“It’s no surprise that the HFPA has chosen Meryl Streep as the
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

"Mauvaise Graine": Billy Wilder's Swift and Satisfying Directorial Debut

  • MUBI
Mubi is exclusively showing Billy Wilder and Alexander Esway's Mauvaise Graine a.k.a. Bad Seed (1934) in the United States and most countries around the world from August 18 - September 16, 2016.In light of his illustrious Hollywood career to follow, Billy Wilder’s obscure directorial debut, Mauvaise Graine (1934), may seem like a mere curiosity. Making the film as he was passing through France by way of Germany en route to America, Wilder regarded the work with little adoration. For him, the experience was one rife with difficulty; it wasn’t fun, there was tremendous pressure, and he simply wasn’t accustomed to have such sweeping control over a production. But the writing was on the wall by 1933, and Wilder, like so many others, was keen to get out of Berlin while the getting was good. Arriving first in Paris, he met other film professionals seeking refuge from the burgeoning Nazi party,
See full article at MUBI »

The Forgotten: Hobart Henley's "The Big Pond" (1930)

  • MUBI
I find it impossible to believe anyone called Hobart Henley could ever be a great film director, but on the other hand, I also find it impossible to dislike a film director called Hobart Henley. It's too much fun reading his name in a credits sequence.Henley had been an actor, which seems to account for his preposterous, alliterative name, except it seems that really was his name, not a stage contrivance. He directed numerous silent films from the teens on, all of them obscure, but his late-career outpouring of a few cute pre-Codes is better remembered. Night World (1932) is enjoyable, and Roadhouse Nights (1930) is remarkable for being the only official adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest (unofficial source material for Yojimbo, A Fistful of Dollars, Last Man Standing...), only you wouldn't know it because it reached the screen as a Jimmy Durante musical. The only thing it has
See full article at MUBI »

TCM Oscar Homage Kicked Off Today: Is Bigger Always Better?

'Ben-Hur' 1959 with Stephen Boyd and Charlton Heston: TCM's '31 Days of Oscar.' '31 Days of Oscar': 'Lawrence of Arabia' and 'Ben-Hur' are in, Paramount stars are out Today, Feb. 1, '16, Turner Classic Movies is kicking off the 21st edition of its “31 Days of Oscar.” While the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is being vociferously reviled for its “lack of diversity” – more on that appallingly myopic, self-serving, and double-standard-embracing furore in an upcoming post – TCM is celebrating nearly nine decades of the Academy Awards. That's the good news. The disappointing news is that if you're expecting to find rare Paramount, Universal, or Fox/20th Century Fox entries in the mix, you're out of luck. So, missing from the TCM schedule are, among others: Best Actress nominees Ruth Chatterton in Sarah and Son, Nancy Carroll in The Devil's Holiday, Claudette Colbert in Private Worlds. Unofficial Best Actor
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lubitsch Pt.II: The Magical Touch with MacDonald, Garbo Sorely Missing from Today's Cinema

'The Merry Widow' with Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald and Minna Gombell under the direction of Ernst Lubitsch. Ernst Lubitsch movies: 'The Merry Widow,' 'Ninotchka' (See previous post: “Ernst Lubitsch Best Films: Passé Subtle 'Touch' in Age of Sledgehammer Filmmaking.”) Initially a project for Ramon Novarro – who for quite some time aspired to become an opera singer and who had a pleasant singing voice – The Merry Widow ultimately starred Maurice Chevalier, the hammiest film performer this side of Bob Hope, Jim Carrey, Adam Sandler – the list goes on and on. Generally speaking, “hammy” isn't my idea of effective film acting. For that reason, I usually find Chevalier a major handicap to his movies, especially during the early talkie era; he upsets their dramatic (or comedic) balance much like Jack Nicholson in Martin Scorsese's The Departed or Jerry Lewis in anything (excepting Scorsese's The King of Comedy
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rampling Beats Hoss, Stewart Beats Mara, Max Beats All: 'Village Voice' Best of 2015 Selections

Nina Hoss in 'Phoenix': 'Village Voice' Critics' Best Actress runner-up. 'Village Voice' Best of 2015: Offbeat picks include Géza Röhrig, runner-up Nina Hoss The Best of 2015 choices of the Village Voice film critics will not influence the Academy Awards, the Golden Globes, or the SAG Awards. No matter. If you're interested in movies to watch or performances to check out, then you should pay close attention to those smaller critics' lists. More so, in fact, than the lists of academies, guilds, and press/critics associations with televised awards shows – or even critics groups worried about their “Oscar relevance.” In their case, buzz easily (and usually) trumps quality. 'Mad Max: Fury Road' tops The top three slots of the Village Voice critics went to expected, English-language fare: George Miller's female-centered actioner Mad Max: Fury Road, starring Charlize Theron and Tom Hardy. Todd Haynes' female-centered romantic drama Carol,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Forgotten: Douglas Sirk's "A Scandal in Paris" (1946)

  • MUBI
Imitations of Life: The Films of Douglas Sirk (December 23 – January 6) at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York gathers a substantial number of the German auteur's classic films together with more obscure titles, some of which may deserve elevation into the higher ranks of his oeuvre. Already, in the past few years, There's Always Tomorrow (1956) has crept up the league table of Sirkian melodrama, mainly because it became easier to see and people recognized that it could stand comparison with All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Imitation of Life (1959), or nearly so.Some Sirk movies will, however, never be quite respectable, but in a way I love them for that. His period movies often dive headlong into Hollywood kitsch in a way that his once-despised weepies mainly avoid. There's a trio of movies playing with George Sanders which exemplify this in their different ways. Summer Storm (1944) was Hollywood's
See full article at MUBI »

The Forgotten: Douglas Sirk's "A Scandal in Paris" (1946)

  • MUBI
Imitations of Life: The Films of Douglas Sirk (December 23 – January 6) at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York gathers a substantial number of the German auteur's classic films together with more obscure titles, some of which may deserve elevation into the higher ranks of his oeuvre. Already, in the past few years, There's Always Tomorrow (1956) has crept up the league table of Sirkian melodrama, mainly because it became easier to see and people recognized that it could stand comparison with All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Imitation of Life (1959), or nearly so.Some Sirk movies will, however, never be quite respectable, but in a way I love them for that. His period movies often dive headlong into Hollywood kitsch in a way that his once-despised weepies mainly avoid. There's a trio of movies playing with George Sanders which exemplify this in their different ways. Summer Storm (1944) was Hollywood's
See full article at MUBI »

Remembering Actress and Pioneering Woman Producer Delorme: Unique Actress/Woman Director Collaboration

Danièle Delorme: 'Gigi' 1949 actress and pioneering female film producer. Danièle Delorme: 'Gigi' 1949 actress was pioneering woman producer, politically minded 'femme engagée' Danièle Delorme, who died on Oct. 17, '15, at the age of 89 in Paris, is best remembered as the first actress to incarnate Colette's teenage courtesan-to-be Gigi and for playing Jean Rochefort's about-to-be-cuckolded wife in the international box office hit Pardon Mon Affaire. Yet few are aware that Delorme was featured in nearly 60 films – three of which, including Gigi, directed by France's sole major woman filmmaker of the '40s and '50s – in addition to more than 20 stage plays and a dozen television productions in a show business career spanning seven decades. Even fewer realize that Delorme was also a pioneering woman film producer, working in that capacity for more than half a century. Or that she was what in French is called a femme engagée
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two-Time Oscar Winner Cooper on TCM: Pro-War 'York' and Eastwood-Narrated Doc

Gary Cooper movies on TCM: Cooper at his best and at his weakest Gary Cooper is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 30, '15. Unfortunately, TCM isn't showing any Cooper movie premiere – despite the fact that most of his Paramount movies of the '20s and '30s remain unavailable. This evening's features are Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Sergeant York (1941), and Love in the Afternoon (1957). Mr. Deeds Goes to Town solidified Gary Cooper's stardom and helped to make Jean Arthur Columbia's top female star. The film is a tad overlong and, like every Frank Capra movie, it's also highly sentimental. What saves it from the Hell of Good Intentions is the acting of the two leads – Cooper and Arthur are both excellent – and of several supporting players. Directed by Howard Hawks, the jingoistic, pro-war Sergeant York was a huge box office hit, eventually earning Academy Award nominations in several categories,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Unique Superstar: 20th Century Icon Garbo on TCM

Greta Garbo movie 'The Kiss.' Greta Garbo movies on TCM Greta Garbo, a rarity among silent era movie stars, is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” performer today, Aug. 26, '15. Now, why would Garbo be considered a silent era rarity? Well, certainly not because she easily made the transition to sound, remaining a major star for another decade. Think Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, William Powell, Fay Wray, Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, John Barrymore, Warner Baxter, Janet Gaynor, Constance Bennett, etc. And so much for all the stories about actors with foreign accents being unable to maintain their Hollywood stardom following the advent of sound motion pictures. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer star, Garbo was no major exception to the supposed rule. Mexican Ramon Novarro, another MGM star, also made an easy transition to sound, and so did fellow Mexicans Lupe Velez and Dolores del Rio, in addition to the very British
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Love Me Tonight – 1932 Musical Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning

“A peach must be eaten, a drum must be beaten, and a woman needs something like that!”

Love Me Tonight plays at The Hi-Pointe Theater ( 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117) Saturday, July 11th at 10:30am as part of their Classic Film Series

I’ve never seen the 1932 Paramount production Love Me Tonight, a classic mix of comedy, romance, song and satire with a first-rate cast, but I will this weekend. The story takes place in France around the time the film was made. It’s an early musical that employs an unusual script device in places – rhyming dialog exchanges that often lead into song (think the early ‘Musical Novelty’ Stooges short The Woman Haters). Love Me Tonight is apparently a satire of French royalty and high society households. Its characters are either the idle rich leading empty, hedonistic lives, or their compliant, consenting household staff. Maurice Courtelin, a Parisian
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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