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‘Midnight Special’ Musical Variety Series Getting Documentary

  • Variety
Network Entertainment is teaming with Burt Sugarman on a documentary about the musical variety television series “The Midnight Special.”

Sugarman produced the series, which ran for 450 episodes between 1972 and 1981, and featured performances by James Brown, The Jackson 5, Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye, Rod Stewart, Ike & Tina Turner, Fleetwood Mac, Aerosmith, AC/DC, David Bowie, Aretha Franklin, Helen Reddy, Linda Ronstadt, The Beach Boys, Tanya Tucker, Billy Joel, Loretta Lynn, Emmylou Harris, Prince, Diana Ross, and the Bee Gees. Stand-up comedians Steve Martin, Richard Pryor, and George Carlin also appeared.

The show typically featured guest hosts, and Helen Reddy served as the regular host for parts of 1975 and 1976. Wolfman Jack was the announcer and frequent guest host.

The pilot for the series aired in 1972 as a 90-minute special encouraging young people to vote in the upcoming presidential election. It premiered as a weekly series in 1973 in the 1 a.m. to 2:30 a.
See full article at Variety »

I'm Dying Up Here Canceled At Showtime

Alec Bojalad Sep 29, 2018

Showtime has canceled its stand up comedy series, I'm Dying Up Here, after two seasons.

Guess it really was dying up there.

Showtime has canceled its Jim Carrey-produced stand up comedy series, I'm Dying Up Here, after two seasons on the pay cable network, Deadline reports.

I'm Dying Up Herewas created by David Flebotte and produced by Carrey. It was based on a book of the same name from William Knoedelseder and sought to tell the under-told story of the birth of the stand-up comedy scene in 1970s Los Angeles. The show followed a group of young comedians headlined by young comedic actors Clark Duke and Michael Angarano as they work the comedy club circuit with hopes of getting their big break on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show.

Notably, Oscar-winning actress Melissa Leo portrayed comedy club owner Goldie Herschlag, a character loosely based on real life comedy club titan Mitzi Shore.
See full article at Den of Geek »

I'm Dying Up Here Cancelled at Showtime After Two Seasons

I’m Dying Up Here has flatlined: Showtime is cancelling the dramedy about the ’70s L.A. stand-up comedy scene after two seasons, according to our sister site Variety.

Dying starred Oscar winner Melissa Leo as Goldie, the owner of a popular comedy club in 1970s Los Angeles who acted as a gatekeeper to Hollywood fame and fortune, shepherding her favorite acts all the way to a starmaking appearance on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show. Ari Graynor, Michael Angarano, Clark Duke, Erik Griffin and Rj Cyler co-starred as aspiring young comics putting in long hours at the mic and hoping to win Goldie’s favor.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Massive Robin Williams DVD Box Set Celebrates the Comedian's Legacy

  • MovieWeb
Massive Robin Williams DVD Box Set Celebrates the Comedian's Legacy
The late, great Robin Williams is being celebrated with a brand new, massive DVD box set covering his entire career. The new set, titled Robin Williams: Comedic Genius, comes with over 50 hours of footage, which includes more than 100 performances across various mediums from talks shows to stand-up specials. For fans of Williams, this may be a must-have.

We tragically lost Robin Williams in 2014, but few performers are capable of leaving such a lasting impact. Not an ounce of love for the man behind classics such as Mrs. Doubtfire, Good Will Hunting and the unforgettable Genie from Aladdin has faded in the years since his passing. For those who might like to see material from Robin Williams they might otherwise have a difficult time tracking down, here's everything included in the Robin Williams: Comedic Genius box set.

All five HBO stand-up specials together for the very first time: These Include Off
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Nabs Eighth Emmy With Comedy Series Win

  • Deadline
‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Nabs Eighth Emmy With Comedy Series Win
Corrects with eight Emmy wins: Newcomer The Marvelous Mrs. Marvel came into the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards as the comedy frontrunner and didn’t disappoint, winning a total of eight statuettes (including its wins in the Creative Arts Emmys) out of its 14 nominations, capping it off with Outstanding Comedy Series. The show tonight also saw a lead actress win for star Rachel Brosnahan, a double win in writing and directing for creator Amy Sherman-Palladino and supporting actress win for Alex Borstein. The outstanding comedy series win is a big one for Amazon, making it the first streaming service to win the top comedy prize.

Executive producer Daniel Palladino accepted the award on behalf of the show, giving thanks to “the Academy, all those who watch,” and a big nod to the crew, among others, “who turned New York into 1958 New York on a daily basis.”

The period drama and feminist
See full article at Deadline »

Thad Mumford, Emmy-Winning ‘M*A*S*H’ Writer and Producer, Dies at 67

  • The Wrap
Thad Mumford, an Emmy-winning TV writer and producer on such ’70s and ’80s hits as “The Electric Company,” “M*A*S*H,” “Alf” and “A Different World,” has died at age 67.

Mumford died on Sept. 6 in Silver Spring, Maryland, his sister-in-law Donna Coleman told TheWrap.

Mumford, who shared an Emmy Award in 1973 for his writing work on the children’s show “The Electric Company,” had a remarkable career in television at a time when few African-Americans were given opportunities in the industry.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

Together with his longtime writing partner Dan Wilcox, Mumford worked on some of the biggest hit sitcoms of the 1970s and ’80s, including the final three seasons of “M*A*S*H,” as well as “Alf,” “Good Times,” “Maude” and “The Cosby Show.”

He also served as a writer and producer on four seasons of the Cosby spinoff “A Different World.”

He continued working well into the ’90s,
See full article at The Wrap »

Thad Mumford, Pioneering African-American Writer for ‘Mash,’ ‘Electric Company,’ Dies at 67

  • Variety
Thad Mumford, Pioneering African-American Writer for ‘Mash,’ ‘Electric Company,’ Dies at 67
Thaddeus Q. Mumford, a pioneering African-American TV writer-producer who worked on shows ranging from “Mash” to “The Electric Company” to “Blue’s Clues,” has died after a long illness. He was 67.

Mumford died Sept. 6 at his father’s home in Silver Spring, Md., according to his sister-in-law, Donna Coleman.

With his longtime writing partner Dan Wilcox, Mumford worked on the final three seasons of “Mash,” as well as such shows as “Maude,” “Good Times,” “Alf,” “B.J. and the Bear,” “Coach,” “The Cosby Show,” “A Different World,” “Home Improvement,” and “Judging Amy.”

Mumford was a quick wit who had a knack for coming up with jokes and punch lines. “He was incredibly fast with a fully formed joke,” Wilcox told Variety. “Sometimes you wondered where they came from.”

Wilcox recalled an episode of “Mash” in which David Ogden Stiers’ stuffy Major Charles Winchester character balks at trying acupuncture to treat his back pain.
See full article at Variety »

Sally Field Relieved Burt Reynolds Will Never Read Her Memoir: ‘This Would Hurt Him’

  • The Wrap
Sally Field Relieved Burt Reynolds Will Never Read Her Memoir: ‘This Would Hurt Him’
Sally Field’s upcoming memoir, “In Pieces,” won’t be read by her former lover and co-star Burt Reynolds and, for that, the actress is grateful, she told The New York Times.

“This would hurt him,” Field said in an interview published Tuesday, following Reynolds’ death last week at the age of 82. “I felt glad that he wasn’t going to read it, he wasn’t going to be asked about it, and he wasn’t going to have to defend himself or lash out, which he probably would have. I did not want to hurt him any further.”

Field starred with Reynolds in movies like “Smokey and the Bandit” and “Hooper,” and off screen the pair had a romantic relationship that, she told the Times, was “confusing and complicated, and not without loving and caring, but really complicated and hurtful to me.”

Also Read: When Burt Reynolds Complained About
See full article at The Wrap »

'Smokey and the Bandit' Co-Star Remembers Burt Reynolds: "Nobody Enjoyed Being a Movie Star More"

'Smokey and the Bandit' Co-Star Remembers Burt Reynolds:
It began backstage at The Tonight Show. Burt was a guest one night at the same time that I was. And I was great friends with Pat McCormick, who was one of the chief writers for Johnny Carson, and Pat took one look at Burt, who was 6-foot-5, and one look at me — I'm 5-foot-2 — and he said, "I've got an interesting idea I want to talk to you two about." It wound up being Smokey and the Bandit.

Burt was at the peak of his fame at the time, but I don't think he ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Mlw: Fusion’ Wrestling Review (Sept 7th 2018)

Welcome to this week’s Major League Wrestling: Fusion review, right here on Nerdly. I’m Nathan Favel and we have lots of great action to get to… starring Johnny Carson!

Match #1: Fred Yehi (with Team Filthy) defeated Richard Holliday The following is courtesy of Mlw.com:

Christmas certainly didn’t come early for the debuting Richard Holliday. It’s no gift when your first Major League Wrestling matchup is against Team Filthy’s Fred Yehi. Holliday calls himself “Most Marketable” but his stock was down a bit after this matchup. Yehi, with his thousands of counters and incredible grappling skills, was in control early in the contest. Holliday found some brief offense and was able to get some ground-and-pound strikes in. But Yehi quickly countered. Eventually Yehi caught Holliday with a head scissors and some piston-like back-first strikes forced Holliday to tap out.

My Take: This was a
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Burt Code: Why Burt Reynolds Was a Zen Master in a Convertible

The Burt Code: Why Burt Reynolds Was a Zen Master in a Convertible
Even Burt Reynolds in his black Trans Am, all gonna meet down at the Cadillac Ranch. No movie star has ever not given a fuck more deeply, more passionately, than the late, great Burt Reynolds. He could give off that Idgaf shrug with every muscle in his body, including the ones in his mustache. He was the Homer of American bad-ass stoicism, with Smokey and the Bandit as his Iliad and Sharky’s Machine as his Odyssey. Both of his eyebrows were finely tuned Stradivarius violins, calibrated to the point
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Burt Reynolds: A Great Actor, and a Movie Star Who Refused to Take Stardom Seriously

  • Variety
Burt Reynolds: A Great Actor, and a Movie Star Who Refused to Take Stardom Seriously
You could say that no actor ever fitted into his time, or defined it, as quintessentially as Burt Reynolds. His box-office sizzle lingered into the early ’80s, but the classic Reynolds era will always be the 1970s, a decade he swaggered through with a slightly brooding easy-livin’ macho twinkle that no other movie star could touch. He was something unique: the first Hollywood stud who knew how to laugh at himself, not just off camera but on camera. Reynolds looked like a smiling dreamboat Greek god with a mustache, and the thing about his handsomeness was how much character it had. The eyes that could melt you with their crinkly charm, or stare off lonely and a bit lost, or turn into slits of anger. The thick lips that pulled back into a smile that let you know he knew how irresistible he was. He looked like Marlon Brando if
See full article at Variety »

Burt Reynolds Appreciation: A Classic Movie Star With a Modern Sense of Humor

  • The Wrap
Burt Reynolds Appreciation: A Classic Movie Star With a Modern Sense of Humor
Much has been written about the New Hollywood of the 1970s and how it was formed by a group of bearded film-school grads who grew up on a diet of cinema and broke the hidebound rules of the studio system. But there’s no talking about American film in the Me Decade without discussing the impact of Burt Reynolds, the iconic star who encapsulated so much of the era’s freewheeling attitudes and post-modern sensibilities.

Unlikely the falsely humble stars of yore, Reynolds clearly reveled in being a movie star, whether he was yukking it up on Johnny Carson’s couch or mugging through silly all-star extravaganzas like “The Cannonball Run.” He had the cool of the Rat Pack, but in a way that seemed more attainable to a country mired in recession; Reynolds’ public vibe always leaned closer to a six-pack and a Trans Am than to martinis and limousines.
See full article at The Wrap »

Encore: Burt Reynolds Has Tales To Tell: Passing On ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’, 007, ‘Die Hard,’ Bonding With Eastwood, McQueen, Newman & Carson But Not Brando

  • Deadline
Encore: Burt Reynolds Has Tales To Tell: Passing On ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’, 007, ‘Die Hard,’ Bonding With Eastwood, McQueen, Newman & Carson But Not Brando
Update: Few in Hollywood had more stories to tell, or told them better than Burt Reynolds. Wanna bet? Read this interview Reynolds did with Deadline while promoting his memoir, with great tales about his interactions with everyone from Bette Davis to Orson Welles, Clint Eastwood and Johnny Carson. He would have told these gems and more had he completed the role in Quentin Tarantino’s film and lived to see it released next year, and it was clear in this interview he was eager for another shot after turning down a dizzying array of roles that made stars out of other actors. It might bring back some warm memories for fans who are thinking about him today.

Earlier, December 22, 2015, 9:50 Am Pst: The wide press pickup of Burt Reynolds saying Charlie Sheen got what was coming when his reckless lifestyle led to an HIV diagnosis has skewed the perception of
See full article at Deadline »

Remembering Burt Reynolds: From ‘Cannonball Run’ to ‘Boogie Nights’

Remembering Burt Reynolds: From ‘Cannonball Run’ to ‘Boogie Nights’
While looking for the appropriate Burt Reynolds clip to lead off a tribute to the iconic 1970s movie star, who died today at 82, my first impulse was… Well, if I’m being honest, my first impulse wasn’t technically a Reynolds clip at all, but an SNL sketch featuring Norm MacDonald as Reynolds as Turd Ferguson. My first serious impulse was from that time Johnny Carson smeared whipped cream on Reynolds’ groin:

And my second real thought was the blooper reel that ran at the end of The Cannonball Run
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Breaking News: Screen Legend Burt Reynolds Dead At Age 82

  • CinemaRetro
Glory days: by the late 1970s, Reynolds and Clint Eastwood were the two most bankable stars in the world.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Burt Reynolds has died at age 82 from a heart attack in his home town of Jupiter, Florida. Reynolds had been suffering from poor health in recent years but was still appearing in films. He was announced as one of the stars of Quentin Tarantino's forthcoming "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood". Reynolds entered acting in the 1950s but his rugged good looks sometimes worked against him as he was told he bore too close a resemblance to Marlon Brando. He made "B" movies before gravitating to television where he landed a recurring role as a blacksmith in the hit series "Gunsmoke". Reynolds would go on to star in other short-lived TV series that never capitalized on his real life wit and humor. Of playing the title character
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Burt Reynolds, Beloved Action Star, Dead at 82

Burt Reynolds, Beloved Action Star, Dead at 82
Burt Reynolds, the charismatic, mustachioed movie star known for films like Deliverance, Smokey and the Bandit and Boogie Nights, died Thursday, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 82.

Reynolds died of cardiac arrest. His niece, Nancy Lee Hess, said that the actor “has had health issues, however, this was totally unexpected.”

She continued, “My uncle was not just a movie icon; he was a generous, passionate and sensitive man who was dedicated to his family, friends, fans and acting students… Anyone who breaks their tailbone on a river and finishes the movie is tough.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Burt Reynolds Dies: Iconic Star Of ‘Deliverance’, ‘Smokey And The Bandit’ & ‘Boogie Nights’ Was 82

  • Deadline
Burt Reynolds Dies: Iconic Star Of ‘Deliverance’, ‘Smokey And The Bandit’ & ‘Boogie Nights’ Was 82
Burt Reynolds, a top Hollywood star of the 1970s whose hits ranged from such classic, easy-going drive-in fare as Smokey and the Bandit to the intense, hunted-men drama Deliverance, died today at the Jupiter Medical Center in Florida. He was 82.

“It is with a broken heart that I said goodbye to my uncle today,” Reynolds’ niece Nancy Lee Hess said in a statement (read it in full below).

With a sly, knowing grin, signature moustache and a unique blend of charm and machismo, Reynolds was a bona fide cultural phenomenon. He became a frequent guest of Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, was the first major celebrity nude male centerfold and off-screen romantic partner of such stars as frequent co-star Sally Field and Dinah Shore. Reyrolds would achieve a newfound respect among critics and fans alike for the late-career peak in 1997’s Boogie Nights, for which he earned his only Oscar nomination.
See full article at Deadline »

10 Notable Emmy Hosting Teams: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Photos)

  • The Wrap
10 Notable Emmy Hosting Teams: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Photos)
Because they co-host the “Weekend Update” segment on “Saturday Night Live,” it makes perfect sense for Colin Jost and Michael Che to host the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards together on September 17. But over the last 20 years, this will be only the third time the Emmys have used more than one host, even though two or more hosts were the norm in the show’s first half-century. Here are 10 other notable hosting teams, some that make perfect sense and some that don’t.

1952: Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz

Lucy and Desi were clearly the first couple of television in its early days, so it was natural that they’d be co-hosts only the fourth time the Emmys were handed out – a show on which their show “I Love Lucy” also won the top comedy award.

1962: David Brinkley, Johnny Carson and Bob Newhart

Why three hosts? Because the 1962 show took
See full article at The Wrap »

Whatever Happened to Kevin Meaney?

If you don’t remember Kevin Meaney don’t feel too bad since he started out in the 80s and seemed to really stick to a niche that not everyone got into. If you do remember him it could be from his stand-up comedy routines since he managed to get his big break in 1980. The comedy routines he did were pretty funny but his first real breakout hit was his first HBO comedy special that came in 86. this was then followed by an appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Yeah, that’s how far back this guy goes, he

Whatever Happened to Kevin Meaney?
See full article at TVovermind.com »
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