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A Quiet Place – Review

After the lights went down in the theater and the names of the production studios passed by, the theater goes quiet. The audience knows what to expect given the title and trailers for A Quiet Place. However, that quietness on the audience’s part doesn’t last long. Candy boxes shake. Phones ring. Phones silently buzz. Watches chirp. Even a baby cries – yes, an infant was in the theater with us. It’s an orchestra of simple sounds that might not have made much of an impact in any other movie, but being hyper-aware of each isolated noise amplified my fear for the family on screen even more.

A Quiet Place uses a simple premise to deliver intense fear. A family struggles to survive in silence at an isolated farmhouse while unknown creatures wait to make their move based on their heightened sense of sound. But with this simple premise,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘A Quiet Place’ Leans on Sound Team to Deliver Maximum Chills

‘A Quiet Place’ Leans on Sound Team to Deliver Maximum Chills
Never underestimate the gravity of sound. In “A Quiet Place” — from John Krasinski, who co-wrote the script, directed and stars alongside his wife, Emily Blunt — looming monsters hunt by noise, going after their prey when they hear its sound. For the farm-living Abbott family, silence is the only means of survival.

This means supervising sound editors Erik Aadahl and Ethan Van der Ryn, who share two Oscar nominations, had to shape an atmosphere with maximum auditory impact. “We knew it would be a huge challenge creating this world of quiet,” Aadahl says. “It’s actually as hard if not harder than making a movie full of sound. You’re naked in a way, and everything has to be delicately balanced and perfect.”

Perspective, or what the sound team called “sonic envelopes,” played a key part in ratcheting up tension, particularly from the point of view of the daughter, who is deaf.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘A Quiet Place’ Film Review: Make Some Noise for John Krasinski’s Nerve-Racking Horror Tale

  • The Wrap
‘A Quiet Place’ Film Review: Make Some Noise for John Krasinski’s Nerve-Racking Horror Tale
A Quiet Place” is an amusing title for what turns out to be a meticulously muscle-clenching exercise in gimmicky horror, the type that imagines a future population terrorized by sight-challenged predators who hunt by human noise. The title is all kinds of winking: It sounds like a lost Horton Foote play about hardscrabble people of the land, and yet that’s the setting here — a quaint, secluded farm, only the struggle is to survive being ripped apart by aliens.

Then there’s the last thing a theater showing a well-made horror movie is … again, see title. Director-star-co-writer John Krasinski’s careful deployment of nerve-distressing moments doesn’t even need a burst of gnarly monster to get an audience vocalizing: listen for the crowd reaction when his wife (off and onscreen) Emily Blunt cautiously ascends a staircase, and the camera stays back to show an errant nail jutting from a step, awaiting someone’s bare foot on the way down.

The collective, dread-inducing moan I heard from the audience around me at that reveal is surely, in my estimation, what horror filmmakers live for more than the shock and gore. (Because it’s real suspense; like Hitchcock’s ticking bomb under the table, we know it’s there.)

Watch Video: John Krasinski, Emily Blunt Live in Fear in First Trailer for 'A Quiet Place'

So yes, “A Quiet Place” is sweat-it-out fun in a trap-rich minefield. (I would also have been happy with a “Get Out”-like exclamatory title: maybe “Shut the F— Up”?) It’s also perfectly in keeping with the near-ubiquity of whisper-acting lately across television and movies of all stripes, dialogue delivered as if mumbling weren’t inarticulate enough. Finally, here’s a movie in which hushed talking would make absolute sense. And yet communication in the Abbott family is mostly with sign language, since their pre-teen oldest, Regan (Millicent Simmonds), is deaf.

Of course, Asl is a beneficial tool when speaking is a no-no, until you realize a child who can’t hear also can’t tell when she’s making a sound. (Hence, the markers in the floorboards that tell Regan where they won’t squeak.) It’s one of the cleverest things about the survival architecture of “A Quiet Place”; what seems ingeniously helpful in one sense can suddenly look useless when applied to other scenarios. At the same time, in the screenplay by Bryan Woods, Scott Beck, and Krasinski, there are tactics to outlast the creatures when in their midst — it’s related to a given noise’s volume — which creates other pulse-quickening moments of near-miss panic.

Also Read: Emily Blunt and John Krasinski Explain Why They Joined Forces for 'A Quiet Place' (Exclusive Video)

After a ghost-town-foraging prologue that introduces the Abbott clan as a tight unit, but then deals them a horrific tragedy, “A Quiet Place” settles in nearly a year later at their forest-enclosed homestead, where a system of lights, soft household items (they eat on leaves instead of plates), sanded pathways and padded spaces ensure a base level of safety for Lee (Krasinski), Evelyn (Blunt, sublimely good), Regan, and Marcus (Noah Jupe, “Wonder”).

Security-minded Lee toils away in his lair of radios and electronic parts trying to find survivors or to build a better hearing aid. Otherwise he’s a grim-faced survivalist with little time to address Regan’s sense of neglect, feeling that dad considers her the weak link. Simmonds, who made such a strong impression in “Wonderstruck,” continues to impress here, deftly offering a believable picture of how jeopardy and inner turmoil motivate a lonely adolescent.

Watch Video: 'A Quiet Place' Star Emily Blunt on Working With Director-Husband John Krasinski: 'Wonderful Relief'

At the top of the readiness concerns, however, is Evelyn’s pregnancy. But as prepared as the family is — from a soundproofed barn bunker for the birth to the creepily coffin-like box through which oxygen can be pumped to an squealing infant — Evelyn’s unexpected labor still partly triggers the second half’s rollicking succession of nail-biting encounters with the audio-aroused and relentless fiends. You won’t get a description here of the shrieking, hungry predators (who wants a design spoiler?) but they’re among the nastiest-looking in recent memory.

Krasinski, aided greatly by Charlotte Bruus Christensen’s textured cinematography, knows when the monsters are best kept offscreen and when to give them their close-up. And as you might expect in a movie that hinges on sound, the mix of silence with noises variously environmental, exposing, and terrifying, coupled with the occasional music-laced excitement (Marco Beltrami composed the score), is spot on.

A Quiet Place” grounds its existential fear with a fair amount of emotion, too, convincingly played. Threaded throughout the peril is a simple but effective message about familial love, communication, and sacrifice, and there are just enough small moments — for the cast to convey with their faces between major frights — that serve to deepen things ever so slightly.

Whether you’re in it for the ride, or the story of loved ones under siege, it’s safe to say nobody could have expected Krasinski (after two unassuming features, including the dysfunctional-clan dramedy “The Hollars”) to have this in him as a director. Maybe for some filmmakers sincerely interested in human emotions, all they need to show their stuff is to add monsters.



Read original story ‘A Quiet Place’ Film Review: Make Some Noise for John Krasinski’s Nerve-Racking Horror Tale At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

“A Quiet Place” could go down as a modern horror classic

PG-13 is usually the kiss of death for horror. Reliant on jump scares, an absence of gore, and an aim to be just terrifying enough to still work for teenagers, it’s the wheelhouse for horror sequels and throwaway ghost stories. Then, we have A Quiet Place. This is a true cut above. What John Krasinski has accomplished here is truly remarkable. From the first Teaser Trailer, it seemed like this had potential. Then, having seen it last week, I was blown away. It’s truly a new horror classic, along with being one of the five best movies that I’ve seen in 2018 so far. The film is a fright flick that actually manages to scare you while still telling a riveting story. Set in the days after a devastating alien invasion, we follow a family who has managed to spend the months since surviving in upstate New York.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

'A Quiet Place' Review: 'Stay Silent, Stay Alive' Says This New Horror Classic

'A Quiet Place' Review: 'Stay Silent, Stay Alive' Says This New Horror Classic
Did you ever think that quiet – the hush in which no talk is above a whisper – could scare the hell out of you? A Quiet Place does just that, raising the stakes on terror until no one can hear you scream. As director, star and cowriter (with Bryan Woods and Scott Beck), John Krasinski hits on a killer hook: What if a family of four, among the few left alive after a monster apocalypse, can survive on their upstate New York farm as long as they don't make a sound?
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘A Quiet Place’ Review: Dir. John Krasinski (2018)

A Quiet Place review: The sound of silence has never been more scary.

A Quiet Place review by Freda Cooper.

A Quiet Place review

If this review contains any typos, the blame lies with John Krasinski, director of A Quiet Place, for creating a truly frightening horror movie. One that generates a fear which hangs on for hours.

It’s the lifeblood of the film, alongside the all-important silence. Outside a deserted country town, a family lead a life where sound is a matter of life and death. As newspaper clippings show, the world has been taken over by blind creatures that rely on their acute hearing to track down their prey. And they are steadily wiping out the human race. So the man, his wife and their children have to live in almost total silence in order to survive. Except that it’s near-impossible.

It makes for a film where every action,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of A Quiet Place In St. Louis – Stars John Krasinski And Emily Blunt

Opening on April 6, 2018 is director John Krasinksi’s SXSW hit, A Quiet Place.

In the modern horror thriller A Quiet Place, a family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. If they hear you, they hunt you.

Paramount Pictures in association with Michael Bay presents a Platinum Dunes Production of A Quiet Place, directed by John Krasinski and starring Emily Blunt, Krasinski, Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe. The screenplay is by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck and John Krasinski from a story by Bryan Woods & Scott Beck. The score is from composer Marco Beltrami, two-time Academy Award® nominee for 3:10 to Yuma and The Hurt Locker, as well as World War Z and Logan.

Enter for the chance to win Two (2) seats to the advance screening of A Quiet Place on Tuesday, April 3 at 7pm in the St. Louis area.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

SXSW Review – A Quiet Place (2018)

A Quiet Place, 2018.

Directed by John Krasinski.

Starring John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Noah Jupe, Millicent Simmonds, and Cade Woodward.

Synopsis:

A family lives an isolated existence in utter silence, for fear of an unknown threat that follows and attacks at any sound.

The best way to describe A Quiet Place, the new film by beloved TV-actor-turned-director John Krasinski is that it feels like you’re sitting in front of a timebomb for 95 minutes. The film’s greatest accomplishment is how successful it is at engaging audiences by giving meaning to every single detail. Krasinski regularly sets up small details that you know will absolutely pay off horrifically – by showing you a timer, a shotgun, or an exposed nail in the floor, the film makes you anticipate the auditory horror that is to come. To Krasinski’s (and co-writers Bryan Woods and Scott Beck) credit, he doesn’t just place a Chekhov’s gun,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘A Quiet Place’ Review: John Krasinski’s Monster Movie is a Riveting, Near-Silent Thriller — SXSW 2018

‘A Quiet Place’ Review: John Krasinski’s Monster Movie is a Riveting, Near-Silent Thriller — SXSW 2018
A Quiet Place” develops its horrifying premise around a gimmick perfect for cinematic storytelling — in a post-apocalyptic countryside, monsters are drawn to their prey by sound, so human survivors can barely exchange more than whispers. Directed with first-rate visual flair by John Krasinski (who knew?), this riveting near-silent thriller exudes the despair of a broken world with the concision of a Cormac McCarthy novel folded into a simplistic B-movie premise. Utilizing the pure physicality of a cast you can count on one hand, the movie maintains a minimalist dread throughout, with every footstep or sudden move carrying the potential for instant death.

Read More:John Krasinski: Wife Emily Blunt Agreeing to Star in ‘A Quiet Place’ Was ‘The Best Compliment of My Career’ — SXSW 2018

A Quiet Place” establishes dread from its opening minutes as dirty feet tiptoe through a dilapidated grocery store and a nameless family searches for supplies. Two children
See full article at Indiewire »

Score: A Film Music Documentary Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Euan Franklin

Film is one of the few mediums to ingratiate many other art forms. Novels, plays, painting, and photography – movies provide them all at once. But one form stands out from all the rest. The average cinema-goer may forget the direction, the dialogue, and the cinematography – but never the music. They’ve all hummed the themes to Star Wars and Pirates of the Caribbean and Lord of the Rings. Barely anyone discusses the cinematography of Phantom Thread, but they all rave about Johnny Greenwood’s soundtrack (promptly saved on their Spotify accounts). The film score may well be the aspect most remembered and recalled after the end credits roll up. In this documentary from Matt Schrader, Score goes deeper into the history and impact of film music.

The film starts in Malibu, California, where composer Marco Beltrami (Scream, The Hurt Locker) has tied a piano atop a shipping
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Golden Globes Music Sweep Is a Kraft-Engel Production

Golden Globes Music Sweep Is a Kraft-Engel Production
Last weekend’s Golden Globe Awards saw Alexandre Desplat win Best Score (for “The Shape of Water”), and Benj Pasek and Justin Paul win Best Song (for “The Greatest Showman”). What do they have in common? All three are represented by Richard Kraft and Laura Engel, whose Kraft-Engel Management is one of Hollywood’s top music agencies. Kraft-Engel’s other clients include Danny Elfman, Moby, John Debney, Mark Isham, Henry Jackman, Alan Menken, Bear McCreary, Marco Beltrami, Christophe Beck and John Powell.

Kraft has been a film-music agent for more than 30 years, Engel for more than 20. They began working together in the 1980s when Engel was Elfman’s manager and Kraft was doing his film deals. Kraft started his own company in 1991; she joined him as an agent in 1996 and together they formed Kraft-Engel Management in 2005. They refer to themselves as “agents who give the attention to our clients as if we were managers.”

Variety caught
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2018: Listen to Selections from 141 Scores Eligible for This Year’s Academy Award

  • Indiewire
Oscars 2018: Listen to Selections from 141 Scores Eligible for This Year’s Academy Award
141 original scores just made the Oscar shortlist, meaning that we have no real idea which soundtracks will go on to be nominated for the actual Academy Award — “Phantom Thread” composer Jonny Greenwood looks poised to finally be recognized for his work, but might “Baywatch” be a spoiler? We simply don’t know, dear reader. We simply don’t know.

As you await the nominations — which will be announced on Tuesday, January 23 — treat yourself to this selection of tracks from the shortlist.

Read More:2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Score



Read More:Oscars 2018: Best Original Score Shortlist Includes ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘All the Money in the World,’ and More

Here are the 141 scores vying for an Oscar nod:

Alien: Covenant,” Jed Kurzel, composer

“All I See Is You,” Marc Streitenfeld, composer

“All the Money in the World,” Daniel Pemberton, composer

“Annabelle: Creation,” Benjamin Wallfisch, composer

“Band Aid,” Lucius, composer

“Battle of the Sexes,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Logan’ Director James Mangold Sings Praises of His Production Team

‘Logan’ Director James Mangold Sings Praises of His Production Team
In Fox blockbuster “Logan,” the title character says, “I’m not whatever you think I am.” The same is true of the movie, an “X-Men” sequel that’s more classic Hollywood film noir/Western than superhero movie. Director and co-writer James Mangold talks about the contributions of his team of artisans in giving the film a different vibe from that of its predecessors.

Cinematographer John Mathieson

The idea was to produce a more natural film, on location, which avoided the fetishizing of superhero gear and vehicles that had become a trope of these movies. There’s a general look of what’s been successful in the last decade with superhero movies, and I definitely didn’t want that. I brought up Westerns like “Shane” and “Unforgiven,” but also “The Wrestler” or Clint Eastwood’s “The Gauntlet,” which felt very naturalistic, where lighting was natural or practical, not glammed up. The whole take of the script was that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: The Snowman (2017)

Ever looked at something and thought where did it all go wrong? Sometimes a movie has everything going for it, a great concept, a great cast, a great crew and some stunning ideas and then it just flat out does not work. Remember Hancock and how it derailed? Or Neveldine/Taylor’s Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance? Well, I’m sad to report that director Tomas Alfredson’s (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Let The Right One In) adaptation of Jo Nesbø’s novel The Snowman is a real disappointment to fans of the book and newcomers alike.

From the bleak first scene to the impressive who’s who opening credits backed by Marco Beltrami’s unnerving scoring (which practically melts away into unremarkable territory after this point), this is a film that looks like it could have that lingering Scandinavian Drama/Thriller inspired chill and a real horrific thrill. A
See full article at The Cultural Post »

The Snowman review

Michael Fassbender stars in the adaptation of Jo Nesbo's best-selling thriller, The Snowman. A satisfying mystery for the autumn? Well...

“I apologise for Oslo’s low murder rate,” says a police chief when boozy detective Harry Hole (Michael Fassbender) complains about a lack of satisfying mysteries to solven one bitter winter morning. Fortunately for Hole, the renewed activity of an elusive serial killer soon gives him a case to wrap his big brain around. Unfortunately, the killer also has a macabre interest in Hole’s personal life.

Seemingly triggered by snowfall, a serial killer is kidnapping women across Norway’s cities, leaving their dismembered bodies to be found lying face down in a drift several days later. The killer’s calling card: a snowman in the victim’s front garden, usually oriented to face the house. To crack the case, Hole joins forces with new recruit Katrine Bratt (Rebecca Ferguson
See full article at Den of Geek »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of The Snowman In St. Louis

Michael Fassbender (X-Men series) leads an all-star cast that includes Rebecca Ferguson (Mission: Impossible—Rogue Nation), Charlotte Gainsbourg (Independence Day: Resurgence), CHLOË Sevigny (American Horror Story), Val Kilmer (Heat) and Academy Award® winner J.K. Simmons (Whiplash) star in The Snowman, a terrifying thriller from director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), based on Jo NESBØ’s global bestseller.

For Detective Harry Hole (Fassbender), the murder of a young woman on the first snow of the winter feels like anything but a routine homicide case in his district. From the start of the investigation, The Snowman has personally targeted him with taunts—ones that continue to accompany each new vicious murder.

Fearing an elusive serial killer long-thought dead may be active again, the detective enlists brilliant recruit Katrine Bratt (Ferguson), to help him connect decades-old cold cases to the brutal new ones. Succeed, and they will
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Angelina Jolie Still Breaks the Rules: Why ‘First They Killed My Father’ is the Movie No Studio Would Make

Angelina Jolie is basking in a standing ovation at Telluride after the first screening of “First They Killed My Father.” It’s the film she wanted to make: Based on the 2000 memoir of Loung Ung, who was five when the Khmer Rouge forced her family into work camps, it required a $24 million budget, a 60-day shoot, a two-hour, 16-minute cut. The only place she pitched the film is the only one who would let her make it: Netflix.

“She had a very specific view of the story she wanted to tell,” said Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos. “It’s very traditional. It’s just as resource-intense to make a small film as a big film, where there isn’t much infrastructure in Cambodia. It would have been difficult to get made anywhere, with all local talent. It all pays off on the screen.”

While Jolie’s film may be traditional in some ways,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Angelina Jolie Still Breaks the Rules: Why ‘First They Killed My Father’ is the Movie No Studio Would Make

  • Indiewire
Angelina Jolie is basking in a standing ovation at Telluride after the first screening of “First They Killed My Father.” It’s the film she wanted to make: Based on the 2000 memoir of Loung Ung, who was five when the Khmer Rouge forced her family into work camps, it required a $24 million budget, a 60-day shoot, a two-hour, 16-minute cut. The only place she pitched the film is the only one who would let her make it: Netflix.

“She had a very specific view of the story she wanted to tell,” said Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos. “It’s very traditional. It’s just as resource-intense to make a small film as a big film, where there isn’t much infrastructure in Cambodia. It would have been difficult to get made anywhere, with all local talent. It all pays off on the screen.”

While Jolie’s film may be traditional in some ways,
See full article at Indiewire »

6 Things We Learned at Telluride, Including Oscar Chances for Greta Gerwig, Angelina Jolie, and Gary Oldman

The Telluride Film Festival is about a lot more than Oscars. Co-directors Tom Luddy and Julie Huntsinger certainly set out to program the year’s likeliest Oscar contenders, including Joe Wright’s Gary Oldman vehicle “Darkest Hour,” Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” starring Saoirse Ronan, Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” starring Sally Hawkins, and “Battle of the Sexes,” starring a luminous Emma Stone as real-life hero Billie Jean King.

But Telluride was also a crucible for conversations about the state of the motion picture industry throughout the weekend, as Netflix and Amazon threw parties and checked out several high-profile movies without distribution — including Francis Ford Coppola’s musically-enhanced “The Cotton Club Encore” — that banked on the festival boosting their critical and audience cred before top buyers.

Here’s what we learned over the Labor Day weekend:

1. Christian Bale is fat.

The subject of two well-deserved weekend tributes
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

6 Things We Learned at Telluride, Including Oscar Chances for Greta Gerwig, Angelina Jolie, and Gary Oldman

  • Indiewire
The Telluride Film Festival is about a lot more than Oscars. Co-directors Tom Luddy and Julie Huntsinger certainly set out to program the year’s likeliest Oscar contenders, including Joe Wright’s Gary Oldman vehicle “Darkest Hour,” Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” starring Saoirse Ronan, Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” starring Sally Hawkins, and “Battle of the Sexes,” starring a luminous Emma Stone as real-life hero Billie Jean King.

But Telluride was also a crucible for conversations about the state of the motion picture industry throughout the weekend, as Netflix and Amazon threw parties and checked out several high-profile movies without distribution — including Francis Ford Coppola’s musically-enhanced “The Cotton Club Encore” — that banked on the festival boosting their critical and audience cred before top buyers.

Here’s what we learned over the Labor Day weekend:

1. Christian Bale is fat.

The subject of two well-deserved weekend tributes
See full article at Indiewire »
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