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The Top Uses of Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” in Movies

One very interesting thing about Louis Armstrong’s song What A Wonderful World is that it wasn’t that popular in the Us initially. It took some time to finally hit home with a lot of people but in the UK it was very popular almost immediately upon its release. The song was initially offered to Tony Bennett but when he turned it down was then offered to Louis Armstrong, whose legendary voice gave rise to some of the greatest tracks ever recorded. This song has been used in many different movies, TV shows, and can still be heard on the radio

The Top Uses of Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” in Movies
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The Awful Truth

The Awful Truth

Blu ray

Criterion

1937 / 1:33 / 91 Min. / Street Date April 17, 2018

Starring Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, Ralph Bellamy

Cinematography by Joseph Walker

Written by Viña Delmar

Edited by Al Clark

Produced and directed by Leo McCarey

Thanks to Louis Armstrong and his fellow geniuses, the Jazz Age transformed a generation and dominated pop culture for close to two decades; Vanity Fair and Life recorded the nightlife of hot-to-trot sophisticates while early risers followed the seesaw romance of a willowy flapper named Blondie Boopadoop and her paramour Dagwood Bumstead, a lovesick Dick Powell wannabe.

It was Powell who helped popularize the uptempo rhythms pervading the fast and loose musicals of the era, in particular Paramount’s raucous output which flaunted hot jazz on the soundtrack whether it starred Crosby as a college crooner or W.C. Fields as a double-dealing misanthrope. Even Norman McLeod’s Alice In Wonderland began with a bouncy
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hollywood Flashback: When the Oscars Were Postponed for Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral

Hollywood Flashback: When the Oscars Were Postponed for Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral
The assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. put the Academy Awards in a tricky position.

The 1968 ceremony was shaping up to be one of the most diverse Oscars to date, with two African-American nominees (Quincy Jones and Beah Richards), two best picture nominees that centered on race (In the Heat of the Night and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner) and four black artists (Sammy Davis Jr., Louis Armstrong, Sidney Poitier, Diahann Carroll) slated to perform. But the show was scheduled for April 8, the night before King's funeral.

The day after the killing, Davis declared on The Tonight Show that...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

That Time Richard Nixon was a Drug Mule for Louis Armstrong

Would you believe that Richard Nixon, a professed hater of marijuana, once acted as a drug mule for Louis Armstrong? Nope, a lot of people wouldn’t, which is what makes the story so unbelievable in the first place. In fact this is all hearsay to be honest but it’s still a great story to tell since it carries a bit of humor to it. In 1958 Louis Armstrong was serving as the Goodwill Ambassador for the Us State Department and had just landed in Idlewild Airport. He’d been told he needed to go through customs, which might have led to

That Time Richard Nixon was a Drug Mule for Louis Armstrong
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Aloe Blacc’s Big Musical Journey

From the looks of things – to say nothing of the overall sound and cheery titles for 2006’s “Shine Through,” 2010’s “Good Things” and 2013’s “Lift Your Spirit” – Aloe Blacc is a positive dude. The Los Angeles-born, Grammy nominated, rapper/singer/songwriter, with the renowned retro-soul hit “I Need a Dollar” under his belt, radiates positivity and good when it comes to society’s ills and life’s better possibilities. Even when he’s blue, Blacc is buoyantly ebullient.

That makes him the perfect on-screen host for the MacGillivray Freeman/Brand USA IMAX film experience, “America’s Musical Journey,” and for its theme song “My Story,” where Blacc visits sonic buzz-places of the United States (New York City, New Orleans, Chicago), and meets its signature artists (Dr. John, Jon Batiste, Gloria & Emilio Estefan) for a broad and smartly entertaining flick. In a more intimate setting, Blacc is releasing his most lyrically
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘America’s Musical Journey’

An infomercial is, by definition, a slightly creepy Orwellian thing. It’s a commercial that plays a bait-and-switch game with you, pretending to offer “information” when it’s really skewing information to sell you something. So what do you call an infomercial that pretends not to be an infomercial?

In the case of “America’s Musical Journey,” you could call it a distinctly inferior 3D IMAX film, an oversize tease of a sonic-adventure documentary that leaves you hollow rather than bedazzled. Narrated by Morgan Freeman, who comes off here less as The Voice of God than as The Voice of He Who Will Read Whatever Is Put in Front of Him, the movie presents itself as an enraptured tale of American musical roots — which, admittedly, is quite a thing to try to squeeze into 40 minutes of gargantuan-screen time.

Over the years, though, there have been 45-minute IMAX films about a variety of subjects (dinosaurs, tornadoes, the ruins
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nipplegate Revisited: How Justin Timberlake’s Previous Super Bowl Performance Rocked the World and Changed the Internet

Nipplegate Revisited: How Justin Timberlake’s Previous Super Bowl Performance Rocked the World and Changed the Internet
For years after the 2004 Super Bowl performance by Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson scandalized the world, the halftime pageant’s producers lived in terror of going near anything that could be considered filth. So it’s a measure of how far we’ve come that Justin Timberlake will presumably be singing his current hit, “Filth,” as part of Super Bowl Lii. Fourteen years was enough to ensure the 50-yard line was no longer toxic for the superstar, who’ll be bringing sexy back but leaving nipple shields in their place in history.

In the days following “Nipplegate” — in which Timberlake tore off a piece of Jackson’s jacket, accidentally revealing her mostly bare breast, under mysterious circumstances that are debated by conspiracy theorists to this day — there looked to be damage to her career, damage to his career, and a crackdown on sexual leniency on TV. But only the first of those came true, as Jackson
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Morgan Freeman to Narrate 'America's Musical Journey'

Morgan Freeman to Narrate 'America's Musical Journey'
Morgan Freeman will narrate America’s Musical Journey, a new 3D documentary for Imax and large-format theaters from MacGillivray Freeman Films, which is producing in association with Brand USA. The doc will be presented by Expedia when it opens in select museums and institutions on Feb. 16.

The film, directed by Greg MacGillivray, follows singer-songwriter Aloe Blacc as he traces America’s musical roots, following in the footsteps of Louis Armstrong as he visits such cities as New Orleans, Chicago, New York City, Nashville, Memphis and Miami.

“As perhaps America’s best storyteller, Morgan Freeman’s emotional voice lends empathy to our story of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

'Black Mirror' Season Four Sets 2017 Release Date in New Trailer

'Black Mirror' Season Four Sets 2017 Release Date in New Trailer
Black Mirror unveiled another anxiety-inducing trailer for its upcoming fourth season. The tech-horror anthology series will return to Netflix December 29th.

Set to the tune of Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World," the new trailer further delves into the terrifying intersection between technology and society, including episodes dedicated to a Siri-like "intelligent personal assistant," programmed happiness and a dark Star Trek spoof.

The latest trailer and release date were announced as Netflix culminated its "13 Days of Black Mirror" festivities, which included extended previews of all six of Season 4's episodes,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress

Dick Cavett, whose interviews in the 1960s, '70 and '80s made for some of the most fascinating moments in television history, has donated 2,500 of his talk show programs to the Library of Congress, it was announced Friday.

His erudite collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming — about 78 days' worth of viewing — and features more than 5,000 guests being interviewed, many of whom were usually shy about appearing on talk shows.

They include Muhammad Ali, Woody Allen, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, Lauren Bacall, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress
Dick Cavett, whose interviews in the 1960s, '70 and '80s made for some of the most fascinating moments in television history, has donated 2,500 of his talk show programs to the Library of Congress, it was announced Friday.

His erudite collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming — about 78 days' worth of viewing — and features more than 5,000 guests being interviewed, many of whom were usually shy about appearing on talk shows.

They include Muhammad Ali, Woody Allen, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, Lauren Bacall, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

New Yorker Writer’s ‘Ungrateful Is the New Uppity’ Essay Sparks Twitter Acclaim

  • The Wrap
New Yorker Writer’s ‘Ungrateful Is the New Uppity’ Essay Sparks Twitter Acclaim
On the heels of an escalating divide between several NFL members and President Trump, an essay published in the New Yorker, titled, “From Louis Armstrong to the N.F.L.: Ungrateful as the New Uppity,” is trending on Twitter. And most who are sharing it are in praise of the piece. Written by frequent New Yorker writer Jelani Cobb, also a professor at Columbia University, the essay outlines a long history of African American entertainers who have been condemned as “uppity” for their own success, arguing that “ungrateful” is the modern equivalent of the aforementioned euphemism. Cobb began with an anecdote about jazz.
See full article at The Wrap »

Exclusive: Evie Clair On Finding the Strength to Perform in 'Agt' Finals: 'I Know My Dad Was There'

Exclusive: Evie Clair On Finding the Strength to Perform in 'Agt' Finals: 'I Know My Dad Was There'
On Tuesday's America's Got Talent finals, singer Evie Clair delivered a powerful tribute to her late father that brought many audience members to tears, and earned a lot of love from the judges.

Et's Denny Directo caught up with Clair backstage after the show, where she got candid about how she got through her emotional rendition of Louis Armstrong's iconic "What a Wonderful World," just two weeks after her father's death.

"I just prayed before that I would be able to do that and I feel like I really had strength from God and I know my dad was there," Clair said, adding that she could also feel the support of her family and the audience.

As for the song itself, Clair said it was a way to honor her father's memory. "That was my dad's favorite song, he'd always sing that. That would be the only song he would sing in public," she recalled
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

'America's Got Talent': Evie Clair Delivers 'Perfect Tribute' to Late Father With Emotional Finals Performance

'America's Got Talent': Evie Clair Delivers 'Perfect Tribute' to Late Father With Emotional Finals Performance
Evie Clair's journey on America's Got Talent reached an emotional apex on the first night of the finals on Tuesday following the death of her father two weeks ago, with an emotional performance that paid tribute to her dad's memory.

Before coming out on stage, the 12-year-old singer reflected on her father's legacy in a pre-taped package, where she shared, "My dad was one of the bravest people I knew. He always taught us to follow our dreams."

Clair -- who has previously opened up about learning how to sing to comfort her father as he battled late-stage colon cancer -- also explained how she found the strength to continue to pursue her dreams on Agt following her painful loss.

"My dad taught me, after I started something, to always finish it," Clair recalled. "That's why I'm fighting to the end, just like he did."

Watch: 'America's Got Talent' Finalist Evie Clair Mourns Father's Death, Pens
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

America's Got Talent Finale (Night 1) Recap: Which Act Is Getting Your Vote?

America's Got Talent Finale (Night 1) Recap: Which Act Is Getting Your Vote?
On the eve of the America’s Got Talent finale, the 10 remaining acts of Season 12 gathered for one last chance to impress the judges and win the nation’s favor.

RelatedFall TV: Exclusive Scoop and Photos on 35+ Returning Favorites!

Here’s what went down on Tuesday…

* Angelica Hale got the night started with a powerful performance of Clean Bandit’s “Symphony,” leaving nary a face unmelted. Like, how did those sounds come out of a child? I haven’t been this speechless since I saw Mel B.’s unicorn hair.

* Next up, Chase Goehring served up what Simon Cowell called
See full article at TVLine.com »

Agt's Evie Clair Wows Judges with Emotional Performance Sung in Honor of Late Father: 'I'm Fighting to the End Just Like He Did'

Agt's Evie Clair Wows Judges with Emotional Performance Sung in Honor of Late Father: 'I'm Fighting to the End Just Like He Did'
America’s Got Talent finalist Evie Clair gave the most emotional performance of the night to honor her late father.

Wearing a beautiful white gown, the 14-year-old singer from Arizona poured her heart out with a cover of Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World.”

“The happiest memories are my family gathered around the piano singing together,” Clair said before taking the stage. “Music brought love and brought us closer together, even through the hardest times. My dad was one of the bravest people I knew, he always taught us to follow our dreams.”

Adding, “My dad taught me after
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Giant-Screen ‘America’s Treasures’ Music Documentary Set With Aloe Blacc (Exclusive)

Giant-Screen ‘America’s Treasures’ Music Documentary Set With Aloe Blacc (Exclusive)
Giant-screen specialist MacGillivray Freeman has signed Aloe Blacc for its upcoming 3D music documentary “America’s Treasures,” which explores American culture through the story of its music.

“Music is an essential part of the human experience, and I look forward to helping audiences discover the unique cultural influences that gave rise to jazz, the blues, folk, and other American musical genres,” said Blacc. “I love the freedom of expression in this country, which is a source of creativity and innovation unlike anywhere else.”

The film will show Blacc as he travels across the country, meeting with other musicians and innovators and exploring the locales and cultures where America’s music was born — including New Orleans, Chicago, Detroit, New York City, Miami, Nashville, and Memphis. The doc will feature stories on Louis Armstrong, Dr. John, Ramsey Lewis, Gloria and Emilio Estefan, Irma Thomas, Brandon Niederauer, and Jon Batiste, bandleader for “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Normani Kordei Delivers Love Letter to Hometown of New Orleans in Emotional 'DWTS' Semi-Finals Dance

Normani Kordei Delivers Love Letter to Hometown of New Orleans in Emotional 'DWTS' Semi-Finals Dance
Normani Kordei paid tribute to her hometown of New Orleans with a flawless jazz routine on Monday's Dancing With the Stars semi-finals, but it was her grandmother, Barbara, that really stole the show.

The Fifth Harmony singer opened up about some of the more emotionally challenging aspects of her childhood, including her mom's diagnosis with breast cancer when Kordei was only five years old, and living through Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which damaged her home and displaced her from everything she'd grown up with.

Normani, her parents and her grandmother moved to Houston in the wake of the disaster, and she continued to pursue her passion for singing, supported by her family -- especially her grandma -- every step of the way.

Watch: 'DWTS': Normani Kordei Gets Candid About Being the Target of Racist Bullying, Earns Second Perfect Score

"Deep down, I am still that little girl sitting down on the couch watching Dancing With the Stars with my
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Review: "Vince Giordano: There's A Future In The Past" (2016)

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

The good folks at the esteemed boutique video label First Run Features are generally known for making available films that relate to important and usually sobering social issues. Every now and then, however, they delve into areas that are considerably more light-hearted in nature. First Run has recently overseen the theatrical release of the acclaimed new documentary "Vince Giordano: There's a Future in the Past" by directors Dave Davidson and Amber Edwards. Giordano may not be a household name but he's a living legend among jazz purists who are devoted to the music of the 1920s and 1930s- the kind of upbeat, immortal tunes popularized by Paul Whiteman, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong.  Giordano plays to packed houses at Manhattan venues where he performs with his band, the Nighhawks, which he formed decades ago. Like many creative types, he is eccentric, to be sure. The film's glimpses
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Age of Shadows review – handsome 1920s double-agent spy drama

Set in Japanese-occupied Korea, Kim Jee-woon’s violent tale delivers bang for its buck in the form of brash action sequences and a chase on a train

Anticipation is high for Park Chan-wook’s forthcoming The Handmaiden, set in the early years of the 20th century, the era of the Japanese occupation of Korea. So, as it happens, is this lavishly produced movie from director Kim Jee-woon: it’s a handsome double-agent spy drama, based on a true story, which was South Korea’s entry for this year’s Oscars. Song Kang-ho (a virtually iconic presence in Korean cinema, with appearances in movies from Memories of Murder to Snowpiercer) is police captain Lee Jung-Chool, a Korean national working for the 1920s Japanese occupier, but with boyhood links to resistance fighters … and lingering sympathies. He infiltrates the insurgents as they travel to China to buy explosives from a European anarchist cell.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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