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Toronto Film Review: ‘Kursk’

  • Variety
Toronto Film Review: ‘Kursk’
For many of us of an impressionable age and frame of mind in the year 2000, the Kursk submarine disaster occupies a uniquely chilling part of the imagination. Even far removed and only getting updates via news reports, the real-time experience of the excruciating 7-day delay between the explosions that sent the Russian nuclear submarine to the bottom of the Barents Sea and the rescue mission divers finally opening its hatch, caught international attention in the same way imperiled space missions used to, or, a decade later, a Chilean mine collapse would.

This is both a blessing and a burden for Thomas Vinterberg’s expensive, glossy recreation of the disaster and its immediate aftermath, “Kursk.” On the one hand, it’s a story everyone knows, and on the other hand, it’s a story everyone knows. How to make it feel new and exciting while being respectful of the real lives
See full article at Variety »

Tiff 2018: ‘Kursk’ Review: Dir. Thomas Vinterberg (2018)

Kursk review: A couple of years ago, we saw Thomas Vinterberg’s last film The Commune at the Berlin Film Festival and absolutely fell in love with it. His latest is completely different, though still has themes of family and loss, this time centering on the K-141 Kursk submarine disaster in the year 2000.

Kursk review [Tiff]

Russia. Summer. We open to a young family living next to the ocean – a working town that relies on the sea for a large majority of its income – whether that be fishing, or the navy, which is where we find Matthias Schoenaerts’ Mikhail, his pregnant wife Tanya (Lea Seydoux) and their three-year-old son. Richard Rodat’s script uses a wedding to introduce the majority of the other navy men, one of their own finally tying the knot the day before they are due on board the submarine Kursk for an exercise. It’s a great
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Kursk (2018) International Movie Trailer: Matthias Schoenaerts & Léa Seydoux Cope with a Submarine Disaster

  • Film-Book
Kursk International Trailer Thomas Vinterberg‘s Kursk (2019) international movie trailer stars Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, Léa Seydoux, Peter Simonischek, and Max von Sydow. Kursk‘s plot synopsis: based on the 2000 Russian submarine disaster, “The film follows the 2000 K-141 Kursk submarine disaster and the governmental negligence that followed. As the sailors fight for survival, their families [...]

Continue reading: Kursk (2018) International Movie Trailer: Matthias Schoenaerts & Léa Seydoux Cope with a Submarine Disaster
See full article at Film-Book »

Matthias Schoenaerts in First Full Trailer for Submarine Thriller 'Kursk'

"Captain! We heard something happen to the Kursk?" An international trailer has debuted for a submarine thriller titled Kursk, telling the tragic true story of a Russian submarine stuck at the bottom of the ocean. The ship is deemed unsinkable but explosions on a test run leave it rendered useless, and instead of rescuing the remaining crew, the Russians left it there and wouldn't do anything. Supposedly for political reasons, which is hopefully what this film gets into along with everything else. This harrowing English-language take on the Kursk story features Matthias Schoenaerts, with Léa Seydoux, Colin Firth, Max von Sydow, August Diehl, Steven Waddington, and Matthias Schweighöfer. The film is going to have its world premiere at the Toronto Film Festival this weekend, hence the new trailer out now, even though there's no Us release yet. This looks damn good, and unfortunately very sad, but I'm still looking forward to seeing it.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Colin Firth attempts to save Matthias Schoenaerts in first trailer for Kursk

  • HeyUGuys
The first trailer for Thomas Vinterberg real-life adaptation of the submarine disaster in which the men were left to die, Kursk has been released.

Based on Robert Moore’s book A Time to Die, about the true story of the 2000 Kursk submarine disaster, the film stars Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, Léa Seydoux, Peter Simonischek, Max von Sydow, Matthias Schweighöfer and Michael Nyqvist in one of his final film roles.

Also in trailers – Harrowing new trailer for Paul Greengrass’s 22 July is released by Netflix

The film premiered in Toronto this week and goes on general release in November.

Kursk Synopsis

The film follows the 2000 K-141 Kursk submarine disaster and the governmental negligence that followed. As the sailors fight for survival, their families desperately battle political obstacles and impossible odds to save them.

The post Colin Firth attempts to save Matthias Schoenaerts in first trailer for Kursk appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

First Trailer for ‘Kursk’ Starring Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, and Léa Seydoux

After breaking through with his Dogme 95 films, Thomas Vinterberg has blossomed into quite the dexterous filmmaker, from harrowing drama like The Hunt to heart-tugging period dramas like Far From the Madding Crowd. For his next feature he’s entering the submarine thriller subgenre with Kursk. Ahead of a Tiff world premiere, the first international trailer has now arrived.

Based on the 2000 disaster, Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, Léa Seydoux, Peter Simonischek, Max von Sydow, Matthias Schweighöfer and the late Michael Nyqvist lead the film, which captures the true story that led to the death of 118 Russian sailors. Featuring cinematography from Anthony Dod Mantle and a score by Alexandre Desplat, see the first trailer below and return for our review soon.

Kursk premieres at Tiff.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Old Man and the Gun’ Set for European Premiere at Zurich Film Festival

  • Variety
‘The Old Man and the Gun’ Set for European Premiere at Zurich Film Festival
“The Old Man and the Gun,” starring Robert Redford and helmed by David Lowery, and “Life Itself,” from “This is Us” creator Dan Fogelman will have their European premieres at the Zurich Film Festival.

“The Old Man and the Gun” could be Redford’s acting swansong. “Rumored to be Robert Redford’s final performance, this quiet spin on a mythological American type — a man who robs banks armed only with his charm — feels like a great way to go,” Variety said in its Telluride review. “Life Itself” sees Fogelman direct from his own script. The rom-com stars Annette Bening, Oscar Isaac, and Olivia Wilde.

Danish helmer Thomas Vinterberg’s submarine disaster drama “Kursk” – starring Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, Léa Seydoux, Max von Sydow, Michael Nyqvist – will also have its European premiere at Zurich.

The movies are among several that will have gala screenings at the Swiss festival, which has already
See full article at Variety »

Corpse Club Member-Exclusive Audio Commentary Celebrates the 25th Anniversary of Needful Things

There's something for everyone in Leland Gaunt's shop in the Needful Things movie (the 1993 Stephen King adaptation that recently celebrated its 25th anniversary), and we peruse the sinister store owner's wicked wares on a new audio commentary that's a special treat for those in our Corpse Club membership system!

Recorded by Corpse Club podcast co-hosts Derek Anderson and Jonathan James, our new Needful Things audio commentary is an exclusive gift for Corpse Club members to enjoy! Join Derek and Jonathan they pay a visit to Castle Rock just as new resident Leland Gaunt (Max von Sydow) is setting up a new shop where your deepest desires can be purchased… for a very steep price. Listen as the Corpse Club co-hosts discuss what works and what doesn't in this polarizing adaptation of what was once hailed as King’s “Last Castle Rock Story.” From the endearing acting by Ed Harris (a
See full article at DailyDead »

Exorcist II Collector's Edition Blu-ray Arrives This Fall from Scream Factory

Exorcist II Collector's Edition Blu-ray Arrives This Fall from Scream Factory
Exorcist II: The Heretic is one of the more maligned horror sequels of all time. The original is a classic. And it proved hard to follow, as none of the four sequels that arrived in its wake proved worthy enough to live up to the legacy. Exorcist II is a decidedly different movie from the first, and it's such a huge departure that fans didn't know what to think back in 1977. And most fans still don't know what to think. To celebrate the cult oddity's existence, Scream Factory is releasing a new Collector's Edition Blu-ray this fall.

Following the enormous box-office success of its supernatural predecessor, Exorcist II: The Heretic premiered in 1977 to deliver another dose of demonic possession to terrified audiences. And, on September 25, 2018, Scream Factory pays homage to this haunting sequel with the ultimate blu-ray collector's edition. The 2-disc set, featuring new 2K scans of both theatrical editions from original film elements,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Exorcist II: The Heretic Collector’s Edition Blu-ray Special Features Announced, Including New Interview with Linda Blair

Regan MacNeil's story didn't end in Georgetown, it continued in New York City years later in Exorcist II: The Heretic, and Scream Factory has now unveiled the full list of special features for their upcoming Collector's Edition release, including a new interview with actress Linda Blair, a new audio commentary with director John Boorman, and two cuts of the film:

Press Release: Following the enormous box-office success of its supernatural predecessor, Exorcist II: The Heretic premiered in 1977 to deliver another dose of demonic possession to terrified audiences. And, on September 25, 2018, Scream Factory pays homage to this haunting sequel with the ultimate blu-ray collector's edition. The 2-disc set, featuring new 2K scans of both theatrical editions from original film elements, is also loaded with specially-created features including an interview with Linda Blair, audio commentary from director John Boorman and much more.

In Exorcist II: The Heretic, bizarre nightmares plague Regan MacNeil
See full article at DailyDead »

Along Came The Devil – Review

Review by Mathew Lowery

Movies about the devil and demonic possession are certainly nothing new. Ever since classics like Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist, there have been countless movies made dealing with demons, exorcisms, or the paranormal in general. Some more recent favorites include Insidious, Sinister, and The Conjuring. But then, there are movies like Jason DeVan’s Along Came The Devil, which tries to go toe-to-toe with many other demon possession movies that have come before. Unfortunately, not only does this film take elements from other and much better movies, but it doesn’t offer anything new or use those old ideas in a unique way.

The plot is pretty straightforward, but it can also be somewhat confusing, and I’ll explain why. The movie follows a teen girl named Ashley, played by Sydney Sweeney, whose mother disappeared when she was young and was abused by her father.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

New Poster For The Nun Rips Off The Exorcist

Given the classic status of William Friedkin’s The Exorcist, you’d think Warner and New Line would be looking to distance The Nun from that kind of pressure, but as you’ll see in the poster below, the fifth installment into The Conjuring universe is practically being invited into MacNeil manor.

Scheduled for a September 7th release later this year, The Nun likely has the disciple of horror in your life chomping at the bit, and rightfully so. The Conjuring 2 spinoff, directed by Corin Hardy (The Hallow), will finally see Valak the demon steer its own full-length feature, and if the marketing’s anything to go by, we should indeed start “praying for forgiveness.”

However, before we get down on bended knee to the Defiler, we’ve just received unarguably the best piece of advertisement for The Nun yet, in the form of an intimidating new poster – which
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The power of a uniform by Anne-Katrin Titze

Milan Peschel (Freytag), Max Hubacher (Willi Herold) and Frederick Lau (Kipinski) in Robert Schwentke's The Captain (Der Hauptmann)

In his Hollywood career Robert Schwentke has directed Bruce Willis, Helen Mirren and Morgan Freeman for Red; Shailene Woodley, Jeff Daniels, Naomi Watts, and Miles Teller in Allegiant; Ryan Reynolds, Jeff Bridges and Mary-Louise Parker for R.I.P.D., and Jodie Foster, Peter Sarsgaard and Sean Bean for Flightplan.

In the final installment of my conversation with The Captain (Der Hauptmann) director/screenwriter Robert Schwentke he speaks about Alexander Fehling (star of Giulio Ricciarelli's Labyrinth Of Lies) and Frederick Lau's reaction to the captain's uniform, cites a line delivered by Max von Sydow in Woody Allen's Hannah And Her Sisters, agrees with Whit Stillman on Stanley Kubrick's expatriate perspective, recalls the reaction to his Family Jewels (Eierdiebe), and states that "every character in The Captain has a reason for what they're doing.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Blu-ray Review: The Virgin Spring (1960): A Study of Vengeance and a Father’s Grief

The Virgin Spring Blu-ray Review The Virgin Spring (1960) Blu-Ray Review, a movie directed by Ingmar Bergman, starring Max von Sydow, Birgitta Valberg, Gunnel Lindblom and Birgitta Pettersson. Release Date: February 8, 1960 Plot “An innocent yet pampered young virgin and her family’s pregnant and jealous servant set out to deliver candles to church, but only [...]

Continue reading: Blu-ray Review: The Virgin Spring (1960): A Study of Vengeance and a Father’s Grief
See full article at Film-Book »

Easter Eggs in Godzilla 2 Trailer Include The Exorcist and The Thing

Easter Eggs in Godzilla 2 Trailer Include The Exorcist and The Thing
Before hiding "Easter Eggs" in superhero movies became commonplace, horror movie practitioners have elevated the practice to an artform, inspiring genre aficionados to scrutinize films and trailers pixel-by-pixel. In his breakthrough, Halloween-themed anthology Trick 'r Treat, for example, filmmaker Michael Dougherty designed the cantankerous recluse Mr. Kreeg (played by Brian Cox) to look like Master of Horror John Carpenter.

Dougherty's current project is Godzilla: King of the Monsters and, as expected, he's at it again, embedding shout-outs to his inspirations-and Carpenter is again featured prominently. Eagle-eyed fans watching the Godzilla Comic-Con trailer were quick to note that the frozen body of King Ghidorah, encased in glacial ice, is extremely reminiscent of the hibernating alien discovered in 1982's The Thing. The research facility set up to study this monstrosity looks more than a bit like Outpost 31, the Arctic location where Carpenter's film is set.

Much less obvious (though just as ominous
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bergman Centennial: In "Shame" Love is a Battlefield

Any passing visitor who’s toiled amongst the weeds of Ingmar Bergman’s vast garden of emotional entanglements will surely recognize the same familiar seeds of chaos, conflict, and spiritual carnage sown between the damned pistel and stamen of whichever variety of lovers feature into a particular film – but in Shame (1968), his scabbed and battered masterwork of wartime wreckage, the Swedish auteur lays fire to the roses. Incendiary combat between dueling psyches in intimate locations fuels much of his filmography – the mother-daughter melee of Autumn Sonata and frosty schoolhouse rejection in Winter Light immediately jump to mind – but Shame ignites a maximalist fuse within its scope that quite literally drops a bomb on the long-suffering couple at the broken heart of its story. By contrasting the domestic drama of Eva and Jan Rosenberg’s (Liv Ullmann and Max von Sydow) decomposing marriage against a backdrop of military destruction and societal decay,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Bergman Centennial: Death and "The Seventh Seal"

by Chris Feil

The Seventh Seal begins with some of the most enigmatic and iconic imagery of Ingmar Bergman’s career. Which is saying something considering the auteur’s filmography is composed almost entirely of meditative frames. Here Max von Sydow's post-Crusades knight Antonious Block is visited by a black cloaked Death and the two take part in a literal and intellectual game of chess. It’s a grave way to start a film, one that still endures for its thematic impact and how it establishes the rest of its stark narrative as spiritually timeless.

Named for the passage in the Book of Revelation marking the final opening of the apocalyptic scrolls and the resulting period of silence in heaven, the film lives in that quiet Godlessness...
See full article at FilmExperience »

2018 Emmy nominations slugfest: Battling it out over our guest acting predictions for comedy and drama [Watch]

2018 Emmy nominations slugfest: Battling it out over our guest acting predictions for comedy and drama [Watch]
“I don’t know what year ‘Will & Grace’ thinks it is,” says Gold Derby contributor Amanda Spears when chatting about the Emmy race for Best Comedy Guest Actress. The NBC revival submitted eight performers for consideration in the category, including Vanessa Bayer, Blythe Danner, Minnie Driver, Jennifer Lopez, Jane Lynch, and Molly Shannon. “That’s too many people,” she adds. “This is not 1999.” The TV landscape is much more crowded in 2018, so Spears thinks having too many guests submitted “might have cost them a spot” altogether due to vote-splitting. Spears recently joined fellow contributors Riley Chow, Zach Laws, and Tom O’Brien to discuss the guest acting contenders for both comedy and drama. Watch the entire video above.

Currently the Comedy Guest Actress category looks like a battle between “Saturday Night Live” hosts. Tina Fey is in first place on our racetrack with odds of 7/2, and Tiffany Haddish, is in second with 4/1 odds.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ingmar Bergman’s Centennial: A Time to Celebrate Joy of Filmmaking

Ingmar Bergman’s Centennial: A Time to Celebrate Joy of Filmmaking
July 14 marks the 100th birthday of writer-director Ingmar Bergman, whom Variety declared on Nov. 24, 1954, to be “Sweden’s top director.” Within three years, Bergman went beyond that: He was recognized as one of the top filmmakers in the entire world, thanks to the 1957 duo of “The Seventh Seal” and “Wild Strawberries.” A year later, Carl Dymling, president of Sweden’s leading production unit Svensk Filmindustri, told Variety that “Seventh Seal” marked a new era in moviemaking: “Bergman uses the film much as an author does his book. As a rule, one can’t afford to be too explicit about one’s own feelings in making a picture. But Bergman does it.” The director made global stars of Liv Ullmann and Max von Sydow and inspired young filmmakers around the world for decades with his tales of existential crisis, the tenderness and brutality between individuals, and the pleasures and insanity of sex.
See full article at Variety »

The Virgin Spring

Ingmar Bergman’s tale of murder, retribution and God’s forgiveness may be the perfect entry point for art-film appreciation — it’s immediately accessible yet genuinely profound. It’s also a compelling miracle story. Max Von Sydow is the proud father who fills himself with a spirit of vengeance that contradicts his newly-adopted Christianity.

The Virgin Spring

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 321

1960 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 90 min. / Jungfrukällan / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 26, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Max von Sydow, Birgitta Valberg, Gunnel Lindblom, Birgitta Pettersson, Axel Düberg.

Cinematography: Sven Nykvist

Film Editor: Oscar Rosander

Production Designer: P.A. Lundgren

Original Music: Erik Nordgren

Written by Ulla Isaksson

Produced by Ingmar Bergman, Allan Ekelund

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

I can’t help it, but the only ‘miracle’ movies that inspire me to core thoughts of faith and religion are both Scandinavian: Dreyer’s Ordet and this medieval tale from Ingmar Bergman.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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