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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Two Faces Of Dr. Jekyll (1960)

It’s Hammer Time again, folks! I’ve covered witches and vampires and demons (insert your Oz joke here), but now we’re going to look within the inner recesses of the soul, where the wicked resides in each of us. Some need a little pick-me-up to bring out that worst however, and The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960) finds evil not only in the lab but around every shadowed corner.

Released by Columbia Pictures in the U.K. in late October, with an A.I.P. rollout stateside the following spring, The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll was not a moneymaker for Hammer and the reviews were mixed at best; no doubt in response (at least on the part of audiences) to the more muted approach to the material, and quite removed from the ribald textures that usually came from the Hammer stable at the time. Regardless, it remains
See full article at DailyDead »

Why Kevin Hart’s Oscar Host Implosion Was Self-Inflicted And Avoidable; What Does Academy Do Now?

  • Deadline
Why Kevin Hart’s Oscar Host Implosion Was Self-Inflicted And Avoidable; What Does Academy Do Now?
Yesterday’s debacle that led Kevin Hart to pull out of hosting the 91st Academy Awards was an entirely avoidable perfect storm of elements. It seems very likely that Hart will someday look back on his actions and regret digging in his heels because he was so focused on the Internet trolls that regurgitated decade-old homophobic social media postings, and did not consider the Lgbtq community who are in the Academy or who watch the Oscars and who have endured these taunts and worse, all their lives. They might have felt better with a simple sincere apology/explanation.

I watched this unfold in real time yesterday, and found shocking the stubbornness shown by Hart, who I think would have made a very good host. He had shrewdly built his way into one of the town’s most reliably bankable stars. Hart today quotes Martin Luther King Jr, but when I
See full article at Deadline »

Kevin Hart Needs To Rethink His Response To Oscar Controversy; Why Wasn’t Vetting Done Earlier?

  • Deadline
Kevin Hart Needs To Rethink His Response To Oscar Controversy; Why Wasn’t Vetting Done Earlier?
Updated: Two days after Deadline revealed that Kevin Hart was the choice to host the Academy Awards, he has put himself in danger of losing his dream job because of the viral momentum of old social media missives that betray insensitivity towards the gay community at the least and an attitude of homophobia at the worst. This has been building all day.

Hart, who is overseas, finally responded with an Instagram post in which he is shirtless save for gold chains or diamonds, and where he delivers this message:

“Stop looking for reasons to be negative..Stop searching for reasons to be angry…I swear I wish you guys could see/feel/understand the mental place that I am in,” he said. “I am truly happy.”

Kevin, put on a shirt, and try again. And do it quickly.

(You can watch his video under the post.)

His missive doesn’t
See full article at Deadline »

Slideshow: Co-Authors Sean Hayes & Scott Icenogle Introduce ‘Plum!’

Previous | Image 1 of 3 | NextSean Hayes of ‘Will and Grace,’ co-author of ‘Plum!’.

Chicago – Tis the season for a holiday children’s book, and actor Sean Hayes (“Will & Grace”) and husband Scott Icenogle have co-written “Plum!,” the story of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the quest to get her wings. The couple appeared at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville (Illinois) to sign books and greet admirers.

Sean Hayes will always be Jack on “Will & Grace,” especially as it has been recently rebooted on NBC-tv. He was born right here in Chicago, and grew up in the nearby suburb of Glen Ellyn. After leaving Illinois State University, he took his training as a classical pianist and improv at The Second City and moved to Los Angeles, where he was featured in a Doritos Super Bowl commercial and as the lead in “Billy’s Hollywood Screen Kiss,” both in 1998. Remarkably, he
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Legionnaires of Laughter Inaugural Awards Ceremony 2018 Legacy Awards

Legionnaires of Laughter (Lol) will hold it’s first-ever Legacy Awards on December 10th, 2018 at Cipriani Wall Street in Downtown New York City. The evening will be hosted by comedian Ken Jeong and will include several special performances and special guest appearances.

The inaugural event was founded by the late King of Comedy, to celebrate his peers and honor their efforts and achievements in the comedy arena. The evening will recognize comedians in a number of categories and are voted on by an exclusive group of 130 comedians, inducted by Jerry Lewis as the first Legionnaires in the Lol Academy.

Legionnaires of Laughter’s Legacy Awards are executive produced by Emmy & Grammy Award winning producer, Rikki Hughes; Veteran Entertainment Executive Barry Florence; and Australian film producer, Louise Schultze.

Profits from sponsorship of the evening will be donated to Jerry Lewis' charity, Jerry’s House. Legionnaires of Laughter Legacy Awards is proudly
See full article at Look to the Stars »

The Five Best Jerry Lewis Movies of All Time

Whether you want to believe it or not Jerry Lewis kind of bombed out when he first tried to go into comedy. He also dropped out of school when he was a kid and would do things that might in these days get a kid sent to juvenile detention like stealing food from people’s homes. It was a different time admittedly but Jerry Lewis was the kind of guy that was born to be a prankster and to be funny it would seem. When he was convinced to give his act a second try he found that people actually liked

The Five Best Jerry Lewis Movies of All Time
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘Happy Days’ Casting Director Eddie Foy III Dies at 83

  • Variety
‘Happy Days’ Casting Director Eddie Foy III Dies at 83
Casting director Eddie Foy III, whose credits include “Happy Days” and the Emmy Awards, died after a fall on Nov. 3, his publicist confirmed. He was 83.

Foy had been a casting director for more than 42 years. He worked with Columbia Pictures/Screen Gems, 20th Century Fox, and Dick Clark Productions. He served as director of casting for ABC and vice president of casting for NBC. Some of his credits include “Gidget,” “The Donna Reed Show,” “I Dream of Jeannie,” “Charlie’s Angels,” “Mork and Mindy,” “The Monkees,” “Happy Days,” the first two “Roots” installments, and the Emmy Awards.

He completed his career as a longstanding independent casting director and talent executive for the Jerry Lewis Mda Labor Day Telethon. Foy’s most recent honor was his unanimous selection by the Academy of Television Arts and Science, Archives Division, as the most influential casting director in TV the last 42 years and for
See full article at Variety »

Eddie Foy III Dies: Casting Director Of Iconic TV Was 83; Shows Included ‘Happy Days’, ‘Cheers’, ‘I Dream Of Jeannie’

  • Deadline
Eddie Foy III Dies: Casting Director Of Iconic TV Was 83; Shows Included ‘Happy Days’, ‘Cheers’, ‘I Dream Of Jeannie’
Eddie Foy III, a casting director who worked on such classic series as Happy Days, Cheers, M*A*S*H and The Monkees, and was a third-generation member of the legendary Foy show business clan, died November 3 in a fall at his home in Denison, Ia. He was 83.

The son of actor Eddie Foy Jr., he grew up around celebrities in New York City and did some acting in films and TV before segueing to casting in the 1970s. His grandfather, Eddie Foy Sr., headed the famed family vaudeville act Eddie Foy and the Seven Little Foys, which included Eddie Foy Jr., who continued a successful acting career into adulthood.

The vaudeville family’s story was told in the 1955 movie The Seven Little Foys starring Bob Hope and James Cagney.

Eddie Foy III followed family tradition into acting – early credits included roles on 1950s-60s TV series like Highway Patrol
See full article at Deadline »

The Forgotten: Torture a Duckling

  • MUBI
It's safe to say that The Ugly Duckling (1959), a decidedly weak Hammer films comedy, would have been utterly forgotten, except that it was rumored to be lost for decades. This always seemed both weird and unlikely for a film from the latter half of the twentieth century, and one that had been released by Columbia in the U.K. and U.S., but the film was a flop and was certainly unavailable after its initial release, which granted it a certain mystique.Though a Hammer film, directed by Lance Comfort (who would also make the more earnest horror flick Devils of Darkness), and though based on "ideas stolen from Robert Louis Stevenson"—specifically The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde—this is a broad, childish comedy, without many actual laughs, but it does have historical interest, and illuminates certain tendencies of Hammer and British films and society.Hulking
See full article at MUBI »

Legionnaires of Laughter To Hold Inaugural Awards Honoring Comedians Contributions to Humanity

Legionnaires of Laughter (Lol), the Late Jerry Lewis founded Academy of Comedians to honor comedy’s contribution to humanity, announced today is its first-ever Legacy Awards, happening December 10th, 2018 at Cipriani Wall Street in Downtown New York City.

The evening will be hosted by comedian Ken Jeong and will include several special performances and special guest appearances.

“As comedians, we learn from the ones who came before us. From the uncle who asks us to pull his finger at our 5th birthday party, to the legends who broke ground in the art form of comedy and showed us where to find our funny bone. I wanted comedians to understand that it is not how long your funny bone lasts, it is what you do with it. I want ‘The Legionnaires of Laughter Legacy Awards to be the ’Oscars for Comedy.’ Representing all forms of comedy from standup, film, tv, theatrical,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Scenes from a Marriage

The marital discord in this show is a different animal than those Italian romps with Loren and Mastroianni — Ingmar Bergman’s miniseries examination of a breakup between two upstanding, thoughtful parents is a demanding, grueling exercise in self-evaluation. Try as one might, we can’t help but compare the fireworks between Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson with one’s personal experiences.

Scenes from a Marriage

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 229

1973 / Color / 1:33 flat Television / 297, 169 min. / Scener ur ett üktenskap / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September 4, 2018 / 49.95

Starring: Liv Ullmann, Erland Josephson, Gunnel Lindblom, Bibi Andersson, Wenche Foss, an Malmsjö, Bertil Norström, Anita Wall.

Cinematography: Sven Nykvist

Film Editor: Siv Lundgren

Production Design: Björn Thulin

Produced by Lars-Owe Carlberg

Written and Directed by Ingmar Bergman

We long ago found out that fifty million Frenchmen could be wrong when the experts claimed that the whole country loved Jerry Lewis movies. Some of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The 'Law & Order: Svu' Cast Shares Funny Show Secrets To Celebrate The Series Turning 20! (Exclusive)

In 1999, when Mariska Hargitay's agents first sent her the script for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, "I remember them saying, 'I don't think you're going to like it. It's very dark,'" the actress recently revealed at Tribeca TV Festival's Law & Order: Svu 20th Anniversary Celebration. But the role of sex crimes detective Olivia Benson, "went straight to my heart and soul," said Mariska, who has won both an Emmy and a Golden Globe for her portrayal of the tough-but-sensitive cop. "To tell these stories has been nothing but a privilege and a gift." (Photo Credit: Getty Images) As it begins its 20th season on NBC, the show remains as compelling — and relevant — as ever. "You couldn't make up what's in the news today,” series creator Dick Wolf said. "And it’s a terrific group of actors." Now a producer on the show, Mariska shared, "I feel so
See full article at Closer Weekly »

NYC Weekend Watch: Albert Brooks, Buster Keaton, Jerry Lewis & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Retrospectives of Albert Brooks and Dario Argento run simultaneously.

As two Godard classics have 35mm showings, Perfect Blue keeps its run.

Quad Cinema

A Buster Keaton series has begun.

Museum of Modern Art

Very rarely screened shorts by Jerry Lewis run this weekend.

Film Forum

While L’Atalante keeps its run, two by Resnais
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Collector

The Collector

Blu ray – All Region

Indicator/Powerhouse

1965/ 1.85:1 / Street Date September 24, 2018

Starring Terence Stamp, Samantha Eggar

Cinematography by Robert Surtees, Robert Krasker

Directed by William Wyler

German-born William Wyler was a storyteller who asked the audience not to understand him too quickly. A notorious perfectionist, he was a masterful old-school director of enduring entertainments distinguished by thoughtfulness and, a rare trait for the times, ambiguity.

At their best, Wyler’s films were acutely observed slices of American life, particularly concerning its ongoing civil wars – Davis treading on Southern decorum in Jezebel, Dana Andrew’s bitter post-war abasement in The Best Years of Our Lives and the deal-breaking social gulf between the would-be lovers of Roman Holiday. In The Collector, those class conflicts get the horror movie treatment.

Frederick Clegg, the gaunt loner lurking at the edges of Wyler’s psycho-thriller, is the very model of the modern Incel. Emotionally
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Making Montgomery Clift’ Film Review: Ebullient Doc Liberates Screen Icon from His Gloomy Reputation

  • The Wrap
‘Making Montgomery Clift’ Film Review: Ebullient Doc Liberates Screen Icon from His Gloomy Reputation
Montgomery Clift has been viewed as a tragic case since at least the publication of Patricia Bosworth’s 1978 biography, where his image became set as an innovative and very beautiful gay or bisexual actor who destroyed himself due to the external pressures of society.

But his nephew Robert Clift seeks to give a more nuanced portrait of his uncle in “Making Montgomery Clift,” a very revealing documentary that is based around a collection of audio tapes and other memorabilia kept by Robert’s father Brooks, who was Clift’s older brother. The Clift remembered here is not the doomed victim of so many mythologizing books and TV programs but a highly intelligent, mordantly funny man who successfully fought to keep his creative and sexual integrity intact.

“Making Montgomery Clift” is a provocative title that Clift himself might have enjoyed because it has a double meaning; to “make” someone, in old-fashioned slang,
See full article at The Wrap »

Infinite Fest: Between the Lines

  • MUBI
The second installment of Infinite Fest, a monthly column by festival programmer and film critic Eric Allen Hatch, author of the recent “Why I Am Hopeful” article for Filmmaker Magazine, tackling the state of cinema as expressed by North American film festivalsPorfirioAs I prepare for my annual pilgrimage to Toronto, I’m thinking about all the great films I’ve seen at Tiff that have vanished.No, I’m not talking about Vincent Gallo’s Promises Written in Water, although we can go there for a minute. Thanks to Tiff 2010, I can count myself among the small number of folks who’ve actually seen it, and will happily verify that it not only exists but also happens to be a stark, deranged, and diabolically solipsistic masterpiece… as, in a way, was the derisive email Gallo wrote in response to my festival invite for the film in the spring of 2011, before
See full article at MUBI »

Why Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side Of The Wind’ Took Half A Century To Make Venice Debut: Watch Exclusive Trailer

Why Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side Of The Wind’ Took Half A Century To Make Venice Debut: Watch Exclusive Trailer
Exclusive: The mission of the filmmaker should be “to preside over divine accidents,” Orson Welles once told me. Indeed, his career and lifestyle seemed designed to foster accidents, divine or otherwise.

A case in point was his final film, The Other Side of the Wind, which took 48 years to complete. It will finally unveil at the Venice Film Festival following a meticulous and painstaking process of re-editing and re-writing funded by Netflix. Accompanying it will be a Netflix documentary about Welles, titled They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead, which may or may not prove a valid prediction. (Wind will be released in select theaters and on Netflix November 2; check out the exclusive first-look trailer above.)

Going back to Citizen Kane (1941) and the Mercury Theater, the world of Welles was steeped in mythic conflict, confusion and strokes of genius, and the release of The Other Side of the Wind will reinforce this mythology.
See full article at Deadline »

Strait-Jacket

Strait-Jacket

Blu ray

Shout Factory

1964 / 1.85:1 / Street Date August 21, 2018

Starring Joan Crawford, Diane Baker

Cinematography by Arthur Arling

Directed by William Castle

The planets aligned in 1964 as William Castle’s Strait-Jacket premiered in January and Susan Sontag’s Notes on Camp was published later that fall. There’s no mention of Castle’s axe-happy melodrama in Sontag’s essay – an eclectic rundown of kitsch touchstones extolling everything from The Mysterians to Steve Reeves – and that’s surprising because frame by frame, Castle’s overcooked fright-fest encompasses almost everything Sontag had to say about the joys of guilelessly bad art.

Joan Crawford stars as Lucy Harbin, a middle-aged outcast back home after a twenty year stint in a mental institution. The film’s prologue sets the stage; one hot night in 1944 Lucy paused by her bedroom window to find her husband sharing their bed with another, distinctly younger, woman. The enraged
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Craig Zadan, Prolific Stage, TV, and Film Producer, Dies at 69

  • Variety
Craig Zadan, Prolific Stage, TV, and Film Producer, Dies at 69
Craig Zadan, the prolific producer known for his touch with stage, TV and film musicals including NBC’s recent return to live event productions and three Academy Awards telecasts, has died. He was 69.

Zadan died Monday night at his Hollywood Hills home of complications from a recent shoulder replacement surgery, NBC Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt announced Tuesday.

“We are stunned that the man behind so many incredible film, theater, and television productions — several of them joyous musicals — was taken away so suddenly,” Greenblatt said. “Craig’s distinguished career as a passionate and consummate producer is eclipsed only by his genuine love for the thousands of actors, directors, writers, musicians, designers, and technicians he worked with over the years. His absence will be felt in our hearts and throughout our business.”

Zadan had a long producing partnership with Neil Meron in Storyline Entertainment, which was recently renamed Zadan/Meron Productions. The two
See full article at Variety »

Rumored Rivals Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor Actually Shared a Surprising Connection

They were two of the biggest female sex symbols of the 50s and early 60s, but Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor didn't consider each other competitors. "In many ways [they] were pitted against each other by the press," Charles Casillo writes in his new book, Marilyn Monroe: The Private Life of a Public Icon. "In reality, they barely knew each other, and the two had no animosity toward each other." Quite the opposite! Casillo writes of an incident in 1962, when 20th Century Fox was bleeding money on Liz's over-budgeted extravaganza Cleopatra. The studio simultaneously fired Marilyn for alleged absences from the set of her never-completed final film, the aptly titled Something's Gotta Give. (Photo Credit: Getty Images) Marilyn felt she was being sacrificed so Fox could save on her salary and spend it on finishing the bloated Egyptian epic. Two decades later, Liz revealed to a friend that she had reached
See full article at Closer Weekly »
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