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‘Kidding’ Review: Jim Carrey Is All Heart in Showtime Tragicomedy

‘Kidding’ Review: Jim Carrey Is All Heart in Showtime Tragicomedy
In the world of sad clowns, there are the ones who hide how much they’re crying on the inside, because they want to give the people what they want. And then there are the ones who let their inner darkness out as early and often as possible.

Jim Carrey belongs to the latter group. He rose to TV fame playing comic grotesques like burn victim Fire Marshal Bill and steroid abuser Vera de Miloon on In Living Color, then became a movie sensation with the 1994 trifecta of Ace Ventura: Pet Detective,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jim Carrey Plans to Bring Robotnik to Life With ‘Magic’ and ‘Desperation’

  • Variety
Jim Carrey Plans to Bring Robotnik to Life With ‘Magic’ and ‘Desperation’
Jim Carrey discussed his plan for how to bring Dr. Ivo ‘Eggman’ Robotnik to life in the upcoming “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie during the Television Critics Association’s summer press tour on Monday.

Carrey finalized negotiations to play the Sonic villain earlier this summer, and is now confirmed to portray him in the upcoming 2019 film.

Carrey notes one of the challenging aspects in the interview, which was for the Television Critics Association’s (TCA) press event. “It will be live-action,” Carrey said, regarding the movie.

When asked about how Carrey will recreate Dr. Robotnik, the actor and comedian shouted his solution to the TCA crowd.

“Magic!” Carrey shouted. “Mixed with desperation.”

Carrey is known for his ability to fully transform himself into characters, and noted in an interview with Variety in September that he had difficulty finding himself after transforming to take on the role of portraying Andy Kaufman for 1999’s “Man on the Moon.
See full article at Variety »

Jim Carrey on What Drew Him to ‘Kidding:’ ‘Idea of Identity’

  • Variety
Jim Carrey on What Drew Him to ‘Kidding:’ ‘Idea of Identity’
Jim Carrey discussed what it was that drew him to the Showtime series “Kidding” at the TCA summer press tour on Monday.

“The search for identity is a theme that’s always been attractive to me,” Carrey said. “There’s definitely something in this piece that calls to me.” Carrey went on to say that the show touches on the idea of “trying to hang on to the idea of the self.”

“Kidding” centers on Jeff, aka Mr. Pickles (Carrey), an icon of children’s television and a beacon of kindness and wisdom to America’s impressionable young minds and the parents who grew up with him. But when this beloved personality’s family begins to implode, Jeff finds no fairytale, fable or puppet will guide him through this crisis, which advances faster than his means to cope. The series also stars Frank Langella, Catherine Keener, and Judy Greer

Carrey
See full article at Variety »

The 'Taxi' Cast Opens up About Their Fond Show Memories — "When We Get Together It's Crazy!"

Marilu Henner admits she had her pick of the litter during Taxi's five-year run. She was the only female co-star of the beloved sitcom about NYC's Sunshine Cab Co. when it debuted in 1978, and "within three weeks, Tony Danza and I were dating," she has said of her hunky ex-boxer co-star. "I mean, c'mon! Oh, and I dated Judd Hirsch, too, the same year. Why not? There were 77 guys on set and me! You think I wasn't going to date at least two of them in five years? Please!" Not all the cast members got along so swimmingly. Andy Kaufman, the stand-up performance artist cast as foreign mechanic Latka Gravas, refused to rehearse and only came into work on Fridays, angering his theater-trained colleagues. Marilu and Tony in 'Taxi.' (Photo Credit: Getty Images) "Before we shot scenes, I would always say to him, 'I got mad because you didn't want to rehearse,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Carol Kane Talks 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,' Her Past Roles, Famous Friends, and More! (Exclusive)

At 66, Carol Kane is just as adorable as when she played Latka’s doting wife, Simka, on Taxi and starred in classics like The Princess Bride and Annie Hall. "I’ve been wildly lucky to work with so many great artists," Carol, who counts Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton among her co-stars, has said. The Oscar nominee and Emmy winner is now wrapping up the final season of her acclaimed Netflix comedy, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. How has she survived the ups and downs of Hollywood for decades? By "prioritizing" what’s important and following a loved one’s advice about keeping friends close. "My mother has a favorite toast: 'To continuity!'" Carol said with a laugh. Now, Carol opened up in an exclusive new interview with Closer Weekly about her family, why she chose not to have kids, and her unbreakable spirit — scroll down to read our Q&A with Carol!
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Jim Carrey Returns to Television with ‘Kidding’

After nearly 25 years, Jim Carrey is returning to television as a series regular in Showtime’s Kidding.

Jim Carrey has made cameo appearances in tv series such as The Office and 30 Rock but has not been a series regular since being a cast member on In Living Color in 1994.

Carrey will portray Jeff, aka Mr. Pickles, an icon of children’s television, a beacon of kindness and wisdom to America’s impressionable young minds, who also anchors a multimillion-dollar branding empire. But when Jeff’s family begins to implode, he finds no fairy tale or fable or puppet will guide him through the crisis, which advances faster than his means to cope. The result: a kind man in a cruel world faces a slow leak of sanity as hilarious as it is heartbreaking.

It’s definitely more of an experimental looking project for Carrey, which seems to be his thing as of late.
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

How to Make a Revealing Whitney Houston Documentary When Her Estate Won't Participate

How to Make a Revealing Whitney Houston Documentary When Her Estate Won't Participate
Who is Jim Carrey, really? That's a question that Chris Smith's documentary Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond — Featuring a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton poses but doesn't quite answer. The Netflix doc special is a journey into the mind of the iconic actor, who, during the making of 1999's Man on the Moon, famously journeyed into the mind of comedian Andy Kaufman, who in turn occasionally dragged everyone around him into the mind of his insufferable alter ego Tony Clifton.

Thanks to clips from more than 100 hours of behind-the-scenes footage that collected ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Veteran Talent Manager George Shapiro Looks Back on Early Career

  • Variety
Veteran Talent Manager George Shapiro Looks Back on Early Career
Talent manager George Shapiro helped put Jerry Seinfeld and Andy Kaufman on the map. But that’s only a sliver of his showbiz accomplishments, which include packaging such TV fare as “The Steve Allen Show,” “That Girl,” “Gomer Pyle, Usmc” and specials for Carol Channing, Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore. These days, Shapiro, 86, is busier than ever, serving as the producer of the Seinfeld Netflix series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” and serving as manager to his 96-year-old uncle, Carl Reiner; he was also executive producer on last year’s HBO documentary about people over 90, “If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast.” A decade after launching his career as a William Morris Agency mail clerk in New York in 1955, Shapiro received his first mention in Variety on April 22, 1965, an item in Army Archerd’s column, saying “Melody and George Shapiro (Wm. Morrisman) were expecting a baby.
See full article at Variety »

Vice U.K. Brings Its First Feature Film, ‘Time to Die,’ to Cannes (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Vice U.K. Brings Its First Feature Film, ‘Time to Die,’ to Cannes (Exclusive)
Vice is bringing the first film from its U.K. studio to Cannes, introducing to buyers the new documentary “Time to Die,” which examines the underground assisted-dying movement. The film follows Dr. Nitschke, better known as “Dr. Death.”

“Time to Die” was filmed over four years and delves into the clandestine global network that illegally sources, buys, and sells assisted-dying methods. The film boasts unprecedented access to individuals seeking to end their lives and working with Nitschke, a pro-euthanasia campaigner. The feature shows his close relationship with members of his network seeking to acquire deadly drugs on the dark web.

The film comes as the island of Guernsey, a British dependency, is set to vote on whether to legalize such practices.

The documentary is co-directed by Matt Shea and Yonni Usiskin. The latter is in Cannes talking to buyers about the project. “‘Time To Die’ is an unflinching insight into our complex relationship with mortality,
See full article at Variety »

With ‘Jim & Andy’, Chris Smith Charts Jim Carrey’s Eerie Transformation Into Andy Kaufman For ‘Man On The Moon’

  • Deadline
With ‘Jim & Andy’, Chris Smith Charts Jim Carrey’s Eerie Transformation Into Andy Kaufman For ‘Man On The Moon’
Of late, Jim Carrey has been exploring a newfound passion for political cartooning, but for now he remains better known as one of the most popular comedic actors in Hollywood history.

His credits range from Ace Ventura: Pet Detective to Dumb and Dumber, The Truman Show and Man on the Moon, the 1999 Milos Forman film in which he played the late comedian Andy Kaufman. A video crew followed Carrey around on the set of the latter project as he embodied Kaufman and Kaufman’s alter-ego, obnoxious entertainer Tony Clifton, but the footage never saw the light of day until it became the basis for an acclaimed Netflix documentary that is now in the running for Emmy consideration.

Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond, directed by Chris Smith, reveals the almost disturbing degree to which the actor transformed into Kaufman and his various personas, refusing to drop character over months of filming.
See full article at Deadline »

Comedy Central Developing ‘Living The Dream’ From Aaron Karo & Dillon Francis

  • Deadline
Comedy Central is developing Living the Dream, from Aaron Karo (Aaron Karo: The Rest is History) and DJ Dillon Francis, Deadline has learned.

Written by Karo and Francis who also will star, Living the Dream follows Quincy Hart (Francis), an internet personality who realizes his career is shallow and tries to reconnect with the most important people in his life. All he wants is love but all he gets are likes. Francis, whose new album is expected later this year, will also contribute original music.

Karo and Francis executive produce with Josh Turner McGuire, Chris Dennis, Nick Palmacci, and Kevin Kasatsu. Underground is producing. The project is in early development in the script phase, we hear.

DJ, record producer and comedian Francis is described as having a comedic style in the vein of Andy Samberg meets Andy Kaufman. He created One Deeper talks, a seven-part comedy series on TBS Digital
See full article at Deadline »

Vice Inks Netflix, Theatrical Deals for Motherboard’s ‘The Most Unknown’ Science Documentary (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Motherboard, Vice Media’s tech-culture channel, is bringing its first feature-length documentary to Netflix and cinemas as part of a multimodal release strategy.

“The Most Unknown” follows nine scientists across the globe who are engaged in research to answer really deep questions, like the nature of consciousness and how life began. In addition to distributing the full 85-minute film on Netflix, Motherboard is releasing it in theaters this summer and will spray pieces across its website, YouTube and social channels as well.

The 85-minute film — which Motherboard describes as “epic” — was directed by Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Ian Cheney who was advised on the project by Werner Herzog.

Through a deal with documentary-film distributor Abramorama, “The Most Unknown” will be released in theaters in 20 U.S. cities, starting May 18 at New York City’s Quad Cinema.

Then in August, the film will bow on Netflix where it will have an exclusive
See full article at Variety »

Milos Forman Appreciation: A Civilized Filmmaker Who Loved Rebels

  • Variety
Milos Forman Appreciation: A Civilized Filmmaker Who Loved Rebels
Milos Forman, who died last week at 86, directed only 12 dramatic features, a startlingly compact résumé when you consider that his career spanned 60 years and more than a few filmmaking epochs, from the Czech New Wave of the ’60s to the New Hollywood ’70s to the post-indie ’90s. Yet almost every one of those movies looms large. That’s because Forman — auteur, actor, professor, expatriate, bon vivant — chose each new project with majestic commitment and care. His two most famous films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) and “Amadeus” (1984), both dominated the Academy Awards, lending Forman a cachet that helped to sustain his career. Yet even after the triumph of “Amadeus,” he didn’t direct another movie for five years. His films, at a glance, are strikingly eclectic, but what unites them is an overwhelming sly proclivity: Forman, coming out of Czechoslovakia just as it was being crushed by Soviet Communism,
See full article at Variety »

Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future

  • The Wrap
Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future
Milos Forman, who died on April 14 at the age of 86, has left behind some of the most sharply observed portraits of human behavior in cinema.

When I think of Forman’s work, my mind doesn’t necessarily go first to his two Oscar-winning juggernauts — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) or “Amadeus” (1984) — or the Czech films that garnered him worldwide acclaim in the 1960s, such as “Loves of a Blonde” (1965) or “The Firemen’s Ball” (1967). Rather, I think of the opening scene from his lesser-known comedy, “Taking Off” (1971): a series of static shots of young women, one after the other, performing songs for an off-screen producer.

Most of the women are earnest and serious; some seem awkward or shy, dressed in contemporary hippy-ish clothes; their hair is often long and frizzy. Some of these audition singers include Carly Simon, Kathy Bates (credited as Bobo Bates) and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her Jessica Harper. What is remarkable about these relatively straightforward snippets is that Forman isn’t nudging the audience for what to make of these young people, or their songs. He’s not telling the audience how to react; he’s simply presenting these young people as they are.

Also Read: Milos Forman, 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest' Director, Dies at 86

The first 5-10 minutes of this film paints a picture of these flower children of the Woodstock era that feels authentic, admiring and compassionate. And kind. It’s a quality in Forman’s cinema I can see throughout his career.

Forman sprang forth from the extraordinary group of filmmakers known as the Czech New Wave, most of whom were trained at the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (including Věra Chytilová, Jaromil Jireš, Ján Kadár, Jan Němec and Ivan Passer), and, like his cinematic compatriots, Forman’s early films are often political in nature, portraying figures of authority as inept and corrupt. In “The Firemen’s Ball,” the volunteer fire department in a small town decides to organize a ball in honor of their recently retired chairman.

Also Read: Milos Forman Hailed as 'Champion of Artists' Rights' by Directors Guild of America

At the event, the firefighters’ committee decide to host a beauty contest and proceed to procure some of the unsuspecting young women to pose for them. The women appear hesitant, guarded, and a few are even somewhat amused by the ramshackle way they are being put on display by these old men. (Most of the actors were local to the area of Vrchlabí, where it was filmed.) The spunkiest of the young women seems to have an awareness of how ridiculous and sexist this is. She laughs and then runs off halfway through her walk for the judges, triggering a mass exodus by the other contestants, and the scene ends in comedic chaos.

Clearly, the characters who buck the system, like the young woman in “The Firemen’s Ball,” are what hold director’s greatest interest. Forman is fixed on the idea of the outsider as being the true hero of his work: Jack Nicholson’s R.P. McMurphy, Treat Williams’ George Berger, Howard E. Rollins’ Coalhouse Walker Jr., Tom Hulce’s Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Woody Harrelson’s Larry Flynt and Jim Carrey’s Andy Kaufman are all individuals that won’t fit into society’s prescribed mold for them.

Also Read: Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: 'Genius of Cinematography'

Forman’s rebels, though clearly stemming from his Czech roots, found fertile ground in America. His two most critically and financially successful films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (adapted by Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman from Ken Kesey’s novel) and “Amadeus” (Peter Shaffer adapting his own stage play), both impeccably produced by Saul Zaentz, together garnered 13 Oscars total, including two for Forman for directing.

At his best, Forman’s greatest work (I would include the woefully underrated musical adaptation of “Hair”) shows both compassion for his characters and wry humor in the predicaments in which these characters find themselves. His work with actors is exemplary, and his filmography is flooded with memorable performances and ensemble work: from Nicholson and Louise Fletcher in “Cuckoo’s Nest” to Rollins, Elizabeth McGovern and James Cagney in “Ragtime” (1981), F. Murray Abraham and Hulce in “Amadeus,” Harrelson and Courtney Love in “The People vs. Larry Flynt” (1996), and back to Hana Brejchová in “Loves of a Blonde” and Lynn Carlin, Buck Henry, Georgia Engel and Audra Lindley in “Taking Off,” to name a few.

Cinematically, I’m just so impressed with the way he and his cinematographers captured these actors’ faces and performances. This is filmmaking that is not trying to impress you with flashy editing and swirling cameras (though the camerawork in the opening “Aquarius” number in “Hair,” accompanied by Twyla Tharp’s wonderful choreography, is a wonderful exception), it’s focused on its characters and story.

Possibly because of his lack of flash and cutting-edge technique, there is a danger that Forman’s work may not be immediately appreciated by younger filmmakers — though in this current era where young people are rising up to stand for their beliefs to their schools, their City Halls, and the world at large, Forman’s filmography is ripe for rediscovery by a new generation of rebels.

Read original story Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films
Hearing the news of the death of master filmmaker Milos Forman, images flooded in. Not of his movies; at least not right away. I remembered Milos, at his Connecticut farmhouse eight years ago poking at me with his cigar. Any threat in the motion dissipated instantly by the warm, mischievous glint in his eye.

I was there to talk of his career; of all those Oscars he won for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus and the success of his early Czech films (Loves of a Blonde,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Miloš Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86

Miloš Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86
Miloš Forman, who rose to prominence as a key figure in the Czech New Wave before establishing himself as one of Hollywood’s most sought-after directors, has died at 86. A two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, the “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” helmer also won three Golden Globes, the Cannes Film Festival’s Grand Prize of the Jury (for “Taking Off”), the Golden Bear at Berlin (“The People vs. Larry Flynt”), a BAFTA award, and numerous other accolades.

He died last night in Warren, Connecticut following a short illness.

“Miloš was truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist, and champion of artists’ rights,” Directors Guild of America President Thomas Schlamme said in a statement. “His contribution to the craft of directing has been an undeniable source of inspiration for generations of filmmakers. His directorial vision deftly brought together provocative subject matter, stellar performances
See full article at Indiewire »

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86
Milos Forman, the Czech-born filmmaker who won two Oscars for directing classics such as “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” died on Friday at age 86.

His wife, Martina, broke the news to the Czech news agency Ctk on Saturday, according to Reuters. After fleeing his homeland following a Communist crackdown in the late 1960s, Forman quickly established himself in Hollywood as a filmmaker gifted at telling stories of rebels and the burgeoning counterculture.

He won an Oscar for directing 1975’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” which starred Jack Nicholson as a criminal who ends up in a psychiatric facility after pleading insanity and rebels against an oppressive nurse played by Louise Fletcher.

A decade later, he directed the eight-fold Oscar winner “Amadeus,” which depicted the life of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the eyes of his rival Antonio Salieri.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

He earned a third nomination for 1996’s “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” a depiction of the porn magazine publisher’s protracted legal fight for First Amendment rights.

Other notable films include 1979’s “Hair,” based on the summer-of-love Broadway musical, 1981’s “Ragtime,” 1989’s “Valmont” and 1999’s “Man on the Moon,” a biopic of comedian Andy Kaufman starring Jim Carrey.

Born in the Czech town of Caslav in 1932, he was raised as an orphan because both of this parents were killed in concentration camps during World War II.

Also Read: Milos Forman Lands DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award

After studying at the Prague Film Academy, he became a leading figure in the Czechoslovak New Wave film movement. Several of his early films, including 1964’s “Black Peter” and the 1967 satire “The Fireman’s Ball,” were banned by Czech authorities.

He moved to the U.S. following his native country’s “Prague Spring” uprising against the Communist regime in 1968; he became a U.S. citizen in the 1970s.

In 2007, he returned to Prague to direct a revival of the comic jazz opera “A Walk Worthwhile” that had first been staged in the 1960s. He also shot a film version, released internationally in 2009.

Read original story Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman dies aged 86

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman dies aged 86
Forman directed Amadeus and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.

Milos Forman, the Czech-born movie director whose films included One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus, has died aged 86, according to Reuters.

His wife Martina told Czech news agency Ctk that he died on Friday (13 April) after a short illness. “His departure was calm and he was surrounded the whole time by his family and his closest friends,” she said.

Forman won the best director Oscar in 1976 for classic One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, which won the top five categories on the night.

He would
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Milos Forman Two-Time Oscar Winning Director Of ‘Amadeus’ & ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ Dead At 86

  • Deadline
Two-time Oscar winning Czech director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86, according to Reuters and reports. Forman’s wife Martina informed Czech news agency Ctk that the filmmaker passed after a brief illness in the Us.

Part of the Czech new wave, Forman graduated from the Prague Film Faculty of the Academy of Dramatic Arts, and caught global attention with such titles as Black Peter (1964), The Loves of a Blonde (1965) and The Firemen’s Ball(1967). The latter two were Oscar nominees for best foreign film.

In 1968, he fled Czechoslovakia during the Prague spring for the Us. The Fireman’s Ball, about an ill-fated event in a provincial town, was a knock on Eastern European Communism and created a stir in his homeland with the regime. His 1971 comedy, Taking Off, his first American title, won the 1971 Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival and starred Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin
See full article at Deadline »

Peace, Love and Dick Jokes: Judd Apatow on 'The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling'

Peace, Love and Dick Jokes: Judd Apatow on 'The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling'
Garry Shandling had just paid for a tuna-melt sandwich when a dark one-liner about the human condition – about his human condition, anyway – popped into his head: "I was born in hospice." He liked it, maybe enough to use on stage, but with no notepaper available, he jotted down the joke on his tuna-melt receipt and stuffed it in a pocket. On a recent morning in Los Angeles, Judd Apatow reads from the receipt and grins. "That's pretty good," he says.

Almost two years ago, Shandling died of a heart attack
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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