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Temptations Musical ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ Sets Broadway Dates

  • Deadline
Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations will open at Broadway’s Imperial Theatre beginning with performances February 28, with opening night set for March 21. The news Tuesday comes as the musical wrapped a run Sunday at Los Angeles’ Ahmanson Theatre. It heads to Toronto for a final pre-Broadway engagement at the Princess of Wales Theatre from October 11-November 17.

The musical directed by Des McAnuff with a book by Dominique Morisseau centers on The Temptations’ journey from the streets of Detroit to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame after amassing 42 Top 10 hits, with 14 reaching No. 1. The musical that follows the story of brotherhood, family, loyalty and betrayal is set to the beat of the group’s hits from “My Girl” and “Just My Imagination” to “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” and more. Choreography is by Sergio Trujillo.

Producers Ira Pittelman and Tom Hulce announced the Broadway dates today,
See full article at Deadline »

Oscar flashback: Portraying a real-life musician could be key to winning

Oscar flashback: Portraying a real-life musician could be key to winning
Among this year’s leading Oscar contenders for Best Actor is Emmy winner Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”) for his star turn as the late Freddie Mercury, the legendary lead vocalist of the rock band Queen, in “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Should Malek reap an Oscar bid, he will mark the 12th leading man to date recognized for his portrayal of a real-life musician.

First to achieve this feat was James Cagney, nominated for his lively depiction of Broadway composer and performer George M. Cohan in “Yankee Doodle Dandy” (1942). On Oscar night, Cagney was triumphant, scoring the lone Oscar of his storied career.

Later in the decade, a pair of actors earned recognition for portraying real-life musicians, the first being Cornel Wilde, up for his performance as Polish pianist Frederic Chopin in “A Song to Remember” (1945). The following year, Larry Parks was a nominee for portraying singer and actor Al Jolson in “The Jolson Story
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bww Flashback: Watch Broadway-Bound Ain't Too Proud Take Over DC and Berkeley

Ain't Too Proud has found its home on Broadway Producers Ira Pittelman and Tom Hulce have announced today that the new musical Ain't Too Proud - The Life and Times of the Temptations will bring the incredible true story of the greatest RampB group of all time to Broadway in Spring 2019 at the legendary Imperial Theatre 249 West 45th Street. Additional information will be announced shortly.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Temptations Musical Set For Broadway: ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ Arrives Next Spring

Temptations Musical Set For Broadway: ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ Arrives Next Spring
A musical about the great Temptations is headed to Broadway. Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of the Temptations, directed by Des McAnuff and produced by Ira Pittelman and Tom Hulce, will begin performances at the Imperial Theatre in spring 2019.

The musical, which follows the classic Motown vocalists – and their signature dance moves – from “the streets of Detroit to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,” had its world premiere at Berkeley Repertory Theatre, where it became the highest grossing production in that theater’s nearly 50-year history. The musical later broke the single-week box office record at Washington D.C.’s Eisenhower Theater in the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, according to producers.

Producers describe the show as the “story of brotherhood, family, loyalty, and betrayal,” all playing out against a backdrop of civil unrest and set to Temptations classics like “My Girl,” “Just My Imagination,
See full article at Deadline »

Ain't Too Proud Will Play Broadway's Imperial Theatre

Ain't Too Proud has found its home on Broadway Producers Ira Pittelman and Tom Hulce have announced today that the new musical Ain't Too Proud The Life and Times of the Temptations will bring the incredible true story of the greatest RampB group of all time to Broadway in Spring 2019 at the legendary Imperial Theatre 249 West 45th Street. Additional information will be announced shortly.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Idris Elba teams up with Netflix for The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Multi-talented superstar, Idris Elba is to team up with Netflix for a new adaptation of the 1831 Victor Hugo Novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

The actor/DJ/filmmaker will not only star as the titular character but will also direct the picture. He will also produce and provide the musical score which is being described as a “sonic and musical experience.”

The Current War’s Michael Mitnick will pen the script. Fred Berger (La La Land) and Brian Kavanaugh-Jones (Midnight Special) will produce for Automatik, along with Elba and Green Door’s Ana Garanito.

The French Romantic/Gothic novel by Victor Hugo was first published in 1831 and was set in Paris in 1482 during the reign of Louis XI. The story is centred on Quasimodo, a hunchback, and his doomed romance with the Gypsy Esmeralda. Elba’s version is set to be set in modern day. In 1996, Disney turned the story
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Taking wing by Anne-Katrin Titze

Michael Mayer's bountiful adaptation (with screenwriter Stephen Karam) of The Seagull stars Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan, Elisabeth Moss, and Brian Dennehy with Corey Stoll, Billy Howle, Jon Tenney, Michael Zegen, Glenn Fleshler, and Mare Winningham Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

On the morning of the theatrical première in New York, Michael Mayer joined me for a conversation on The Seagull. He explained producer Tom Hulce's role, their meeting with Annette Bening, that Saoirse Ronan was in-between starring in John Crowley's adaptation of Colm Tóibín's Brooklyn and being cast in Greta Gerwig's Lady Bird, and why producer Leslie Urdang suggested Elisabeth Moss for Nina.

He told me how costume designer Ann Roth, production designer Jane Musky and cinematographer Matthew J Lloyd were vital collaborators for the look of the film.

Michael Mayer on Ann Roth: "She stuck cookie crumbs into Brian Dennehy's jacket pocket." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michael
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan Fly With ‘The Seagull’; Olivia Holt Studies ‘Class Rank’ – Specialty B.O. Preview

Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan Fly With ‘The Seagull’; Olivia Holt Studies ‘Class Rank’ – Specialty B.O. Preview
An abundance of new Specialty releases will roll into theaters and on-demand this weekend, including newcomers with Hollywood A-listers such as Sony Pictures Classics’ drama The Seagull, based on the Chekhov play and starring Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan and Elisabeth Moss. Olivia Holt, Skyler Gisondo, Kristin Chenoweth and Bruce Dern star in Cinedigm Entertainment’s comedy-romance Class Rank, making a day and date bow this weekend, while a cross-section of documentaries will open, hoping to tap some of the momentum of last weekend’s successful launch of non-fiction title Rbg. Good Deed Entertainment is opening Always At the Carlyle by Matthew Miele with a cast of stars effusing about the legendary Upper East Side New York hotel. Sara Driver’s Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat about the late artist’s pre-fame years in a now lost downtown Manhattan begins its run via Magnolia Pictures (which
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Seagull’ Review: Annette Bening & Saoirse Ronan Lead Sterling Cast In Smart Take On Chekhov Classic

‘The Seagull’ Review: Annette Bening & Saoirse Ronan Lead Sterling Cast In Smart Take On Chekhov Classic
The great director Sidney Lumet brought a beautifully acted version of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull to the screen in 1968, but apparently it has taken another half-century to get a another version that gives Chekhov’s 1895 play a new spin in movies.

I have to say, the new The Seagull compares favorably to any previous attempt, particularly in bringing out the lighter aspects of what is a very funny piece. Lumet’s version had the likes of James Mason and Vanessa Redgrave among others, and the 2018 model is similarly blessed with a brilliant cast at the top of their game. And though director Michael Mayer and screenwriter Stephen Karam come largely from the American theater, this sparkling version feels anything but theatrical; it has been gloriously shot and is beautifully cinematic.

But as I say in my video review above, it is all on the page and in the playing.
See full article at Deadline »

Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan, Elisabeth Moss drama 'The Seagull' sells to UK (exclusive)

Feature premiered at the recent Tribeca Film Festival.

The Seagull, Michael Mayer’s drama that recently premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, has been picked up for UK distribution by Thunderbird Releasing.

Starring Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan, Elisabeth Moss and Corey Stoll, the film focuses on eight people at a country estate in Russia, all grappling with various romantic entanglements while exploring the dangerous nature of narcissism.

The film’s UK release is slated for summer 2018.

The deal was negotiated by Edward Fletcher, managing director of Thunderbird Releasing, and Carl Clifton, president of sales representative Hyde Park International. On the acquisition,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Amadeus’ voted top Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1980s, rising above all ‘mediocrities’ [Poll Results]

While Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) says in “Amadeus” that he speaks for “all mediocrities in the world,” the film clearly rises above such mediocrities, according to you. The 1984 movie is your favorite Best Picture winner of the 1980s, based on the votes of a recent Gold Derby poll. The biopic about the complicated relationship between Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) narrowly won the vote over the nine other ’80s winners.

Amadeus” won with 25% of the vote, just barely beating “Rain Man” (1988), which earned 21%. The rest of the top five included “Platoon” (1986) in third at 15%, “Terms of Endearment” (1983) in fourth with 12% and “Ordinary People” (1980) in fifth at 10%. No other films came close to this top five, with a three movies earning 4% of the vote: “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989), “Gandhi” (1982) and “The Last Emperor” (1987). “Out of Africa” (1985) drummed up 3% of the vote while “Chariots of Fire” (1981) was the last to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
See full article at Gold Derby »

F. Murray Abraham on Milos Forman: 'Tough as Nails, a Nose for the Truth'

F. Murray Abraham on Milos Forman: 'Tough as Nails, a Nose for the Truth'
When news broke over the weekend about the death of Czech-American filmmaker Milos Forman, movie lovers, actors and directors mourned the legacy of a man who celebrated rebels and outcasts in iconic, Oscar-winning works like One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Amadeus. Forman was fearless, taking on controversial projects – his satire The Fireman's Ball was banned in his homeland of Czechoslovakia – and, in the case of Amadeus, arguing that the roles of the vain, mediocre composer Antonio Salieri and bratty young genius Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart must be played by unknowns rather than movie stars.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future

  • The Wrap
Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future
Milos Forman, who died on April 14 at the age of 86, has left behind some of the most sharply observed portraits of human behavior in cinema.

When I think of Forman’s work, my mind doesn’t necessarily go first to his two Oscar-winning juggernauts — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) or “Amadeus” (1984) — or the Czech films that garnered him worldwide acclaim in the 1960s, such as “Loves of a Blonde” (1965) or “The Firemen’s Ball” (1967). Rather, I think of the opening scene from his lesser-known comedy, “Taking Off” (1971): a series of static shots of young women, one after the other, performing songs for an off-screen producer.

Most of the women are earnest and serious; some seem awkward or shy, dressed in contemporary hippy-ish clothes; their hair is often long and frizzy. Some of these audition singers include Carly Simon, Kathy Bates (credited as Bobo Bates) and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her Jessica Harper. What is remarkable about these relatively straightforward snippets is that Forman isn’t nudging the audience for what to make of these young people, or their songs. He’s not telling the audience how to react; he’s simply presenting these young people as they are.

Also Read: Milos Forman, 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest' Director, Dies at 86

The first 5-10 minutes of this film paints a picture of these flower children of the Woodstock era that feels authentic, admiring and compassionate. And kind. It’s a quality in Forman’s cinema I can see throughout his career.

Forman sprang forth from the extraordinary group of filmmakers known as the Czech New Wave, most of whom were trained at the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (including Věra Chytilová, Jaromil Jireš, Ján Kadár, Jan Němec and Ivan Passer), and, like his cinematic compatriots, Forman’s early films are often political in nature, portraying figures of authority as inept and corrupt. In “The Firemen’s Ball,” the volunteer fire department in a small town decides to organize a ball in honor of their recently retired chairman.

Also Read: Milos Forman Hailed as 'Champion of Artists' Rights' by Directors Guild of America

At the event, the firefighters’ committee decide to host a beauty contest and proceed to procure some of the unsuspecting young women to pose for them. The women appear hesitant, guarded, and a few are even somewhat amused by the ramshackle way they are being put on display by these old men. (Most of the actors were local to the area of Vrchlabí, where it was filmed.) The spunkiest of the young women seems to have an awareness of how ridiculous and sexist this is. She laughs and then runs off halfway through her walk for the judges, triggering a mass exodus by the other contestants, and the scene ends in comedic chaos.

Clearly, the characters who buck the system, like the young woman in “The Firemen’s Ball,” are what hold director’s greatest interest. Forman is fixed on the idea of the outsider as being the true hero of his work: Jack Nicholson’s R.P. McMurphy, Treat Williams’ George Berger, Howard E. Rollins’ Coalhouse Walker Jr., Tom Hulce’s Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Woody Harrelson’s Larry Flynt and Jim Carrey’s Andy Kaufman are all individuals that won’t fit into society’s prescribed mold for them.

Also Read: Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: 'Genius of Cinematography'

Forman’s rebels, though clearly stemming from his Czech roots, found fertile ground in America. His two most critically and financially successful films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (adapted by Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman from Ken Kesey’s novel) and “Amadeus” (Peter Shaffer adapting his own stage play), both impeccably produced by Saul Zaentz, together garnered 13 Oscars total, including two for Forman for directing.

At his best, Forman’s greatest work (I would include the woefully underrated musical adaptation of “Hair”) shows both compassion for his characters and wry humor in the predicaments in which these characters find themselves. His work with actors is exemplary, and his filmography is flooded with memorable performances and ensemble work: from Nicholson and Louise Fletcher in “Cuckoo’s Nest” to Rollins, Elizabeth McGovern and James Cagney in “Ragtime” (1981), F. Murray Abraham and Hulce in “Amadeus,” Harrelson and Courtney Love in “The People vs. Larry Flynt” (1996), and back to Hana Brejchová in “Loves of a Blonde” and Lynn Carlin, Buck Henry, Georgia Engel and Audra Lindley in “Taking Off,” to name a few.

Cinematically, I’m just so impressed with the way he and his cinematographers captured these actors’ faces and performances. This is filmmaking that is not trying to impress you with flashy editing and swirling cameras (though the camerawork in the opening “Aquarius” number in “Hair,” accompanied by Twyla Tharp’s wonderful choreography, is a wonderful exception), it’s focused on its characters and story.

Possibly because of his lack of flash and cutting-edge technique, there is a danger that Forman’s work may not be immediately appreciated by younger filmmakers — though in this current era where young people are rising up to stand for their beliefs to their schools, their City Halls, and the world at large, Forman’s filmography is ripe for rediscovery by a new generation of rebels.

Read original story Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Milos Forman, ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Celebrated Non-Conformists

  • Variety
Milos Forman, ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Celebrated Non-Conformists
Milos Forman celebrated the non-conformist, lionizing the likes of Randle McMurphy, Larry Flynt, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and others who just couldn’t be bothered to give a damn about convention. But what made the director’s films great was that he also showed the toll that kind of iconoclasm takes on revolutionaries.

It was something that he knew firsthand. Forman, who died Saturday at the age of 86, spent his formative years in Communist-dominated Czechoslovakia. He made a name for himself with 1967’s “The Fireman’s Ball,” a satire of small-town grift that also, by proxy, lampooned the corruption of the East European Communist system. Forman would go into exile a year later after the Soviets invaded Czechoslovakia to crush the period of political liberalization known as the Prague Spring.

That sense of the power of institutions to crush radicals and truth-tellers permeated the rest of Forman’s work and may be the reason that,
See full article at Variety »

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films

Peter Travers: How Milos Forman Injected Warmth and Mischief Into Stellar Films
Hearing the news of the death of master filmmaker Milos Forman, images flooded in. Not of his movies; at least not right away. I remembered Milos, at his Connecticut farmhouse eight years ago poking at me with his cigar. Any threat in the motion dissipated instantly by the warm, mischievous glint in his eye.

I was there to talk of his career; of all those Oscars he won for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Amadeus and the success of his early Czech films (Loves of a Blonde,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Milos Forman Two-Time Oscar Winning Director Of ‘Amadeus’ & ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ Dead At 86

  • Deadline
Two-time Oscar winning Czech director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86, according to Reuters and reports. Forman’s wife Martina informed Czech news agency Ctk that the filmmaker passed after a brief illness in the Us.

Part of the Czech new wave, Forman graduated from the Prague Film Faculty of the Academy of Dramatic Arts, and caught global attention with such titles as Black Peter (1964), The Loves of a Blonde (1965) and The Firemen’s Ball(1967). The latter two were Oscar nominees for best foreign film.

In 1968, he fled Czechoslovakia during the Prague spring for the Us. The Fireman’s Ball, about an ill-fated event in a provincial town, was a knock on Eastern European Communism and created a stir in his homeland with the regime. His 1971 comedy, Taking Off, his first American title, won the 1971 Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival and starred Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin
See full article at Deadline »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Daniel Day-Lewis, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1980s are some of Hollywood’s most beloved acting legends. We saw icons of yesteryear finally winning their first Oscar, like Henry Fonda and Paul Newman, in addition to actors who have endured through decades of film, like Robert De Niro, Ben Kingsley, Robert Duvall, Michael Douglas, Dustin Hoffman and Daniel Day-Lewis. The decade also saw newer stars like F. Murray Abraham and William Hurt step into the spotlight and launch lasting careers of their own.

Who is your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert De Niro, “Raging Bull” (1980) — The ’80s started off with one of the most memorable performances in movie history — De Niro as troubled boxer Jake Lamotta in “Raging Bull.” De Niro won Best Supporting Actor five years earlier for “The Godfather Part
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
See full article at Gold Derby »

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]
The 1980s were a big era for the “epic” movie winning Best Picture at the Oscars. “Chariots of Fire,” “Gandhi,” “Out of Africa,” “Platoon” and “The Last Emperor” all share that grand-scale style of film that tends to be rewarded decade after decade at the Oscars. The ’80s also included just as many intense character studies winning Best Picture, including “Ordinary People,” “Terms of Endearment” and “Amadeus,” while others were on the lighter side, like “Rain Man” and “Driving Miss Daisy.”

In this divisive decade, which Best Picture-winning film remains your favorite? Let us take a look back on each winner and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Ordinary People” (1980) — “Ordinary People,” Robert Redford‘s directing debut, has gotten a bad rap over the years for beating Martin Scorsese‘s “Raging Bull,” but it remains one of the most moving films to win Best Picture. The film tells
See full article at Gold Derby »
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