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Watch Gwen Stefani Face Superfan in 'Who Knows Gwen Stefani?' on 'Kimmel'

Watch Gwen Stefani Face Superfan in 'Who Knows Gwen Stefani?' on 'Kimmel'
Gwen Stefani and a Stefani superfan faced off in an existentially mind-bending game of "Who Knows Gwen Stefani?" on Jimmy Kimmel Live Wednesday.

Stefani's opponent was a woman named Gaiane, who said she became a fan at 15 and has been to over 100 Stefani and No Doubt shows. Kimmel explained that Stefani and Gaiane would be quizzed on the minutiae of Stefani's life, and the winner would take home a personal belonging of their opponent. For Stefani, that was a jacket and bag from her sunglasses, while Gaiane was offering up her No Doubt vanity plate.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" (1969) Starring Jane Fonda; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

“Yowza, Yowza, Yowza!”

By Raymond Benson

This was the film that convinced audiences and critics alike that Jane Fonda could act. After appearing throughout the Sixties in glamour-girl and comic roles (Cat Ballou, Barbarella) that barely scratched the surface of what this talented actress could do, along came They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, which featured a tough, cynical, mean-spirited, and take-no-prisoners Jane Fonda as Gloria, a down-on-her-luck contestant in a Depression-era marathon dance contest. The showy role resulted in her first Best Actress Oscar nomination.

The picture also awarded Sydney Pollack his first Directing nomination; in fact, the film received a total of nine Oscar nominations, including Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actress (Susannah York), and Supporting Actor (Gig Young, who won); but it did not, curiously, land a Best Picture nod. It deserved it.

The dance marathon contests in the early 1930s were
See full article at CinemaRetro »

9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)

  • The Wrap
9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)
On this day in 1946, the bikini made its debut. To celebrate #NationalBikiniDay, let’s take a look back at some of the most iconic swimsuits–both one- and two-piece–in film and television, from the 1930s to the present. 1930s: Jean Harlow In the 1930s, before her death at age 26, film actress Jean Harlow was a Hollywood sex symbol. According to Redbook, she was also one of the earliest stars to be photographed in a swimsuit. 1940s: Betty Grable Betty Grable was celebrated in the 1930s and 40s for her “million dollar legs.” Though this yellow bikini is not as famous as Grable’s famous...
See full article at The Wrap »

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

A recent article (based on a very unscientific poll) argued that millennials don’t really care about old movies. Maybe that’s true, and maybe it isn’t, but the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are missing out, but it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and forever alter their viewing habits.

This week’s question: What is one classic film you would recommend to someone who doesn’t watch them?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Hello Beautiful, /Film, Thrillist, etc

Rebel Without a Cause.” I’ll out myself by saying that I’ve only recently seen this film
See full article at Indiewire »

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month
Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Updated: Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. On Thursday night, TCM presented five Colman star vehicles that should be popping up again in the not-too-distant future: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a phenomenal central performance. Ah, it also shows its star without his trademark mustache – about as famous at the time as Clark Gable's. Perhaps
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)

9 Most Memorable Swimsuits in TV and Film History, From Jean Harlow to Halle Berry (Photos)
On this day in 1946, the bikini made its debut. To celebrate #NationalBikiniDay, let’s take a look back at some of the most iconic swimsuits–both one- and two-piece–in film and television, from the 1930s to the present. 1930s: Jean Harlow In the 1930s, before her death at age 26, film actress Jean Harlow was a Hollywood sex symbol. According to Redbook, she was also one of the earliest stars to be photographed in a swimsuit. 1940s: Betty Grable Betty Grable was celebrated in the 1930s and 40s for her “million dollar legs.” Though this yellow bikini is not as famous as Grable’s famous.
See full article at The Wrap »

Bombshell: The Heddy Lamarr Story proves pretty and smart aren’t necessarily mutually exclusive

In the first part of Hollywood’s Golden Era when classic beauties such as Gene Tierney, Greta Garbo, Jean Harlow, Marlene Dietrich and Merle Oberon ruled the screen, Heddy Lamarr was the fairest of them all. In fact, her face became the inspiration for Walt Disney’s animators when they created the Snow White figure. By any measure except critical acclaim, Lamarr had a successful career. She starred in blockbusters like Cecile B DeMille’s Samson and Delilah and the steamy White Cargo (that had her impersonating a woman of color). And given the chance, she did hold her own against some of...read more
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Otd: Babs, Shirley, and "Cool" from West Side Story

On this very gay day (4/24) in history as it relates to showbiz...

1873 Silent film director Robert Wiene, best known for The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1920) born in Breslau (Note: other online sources disagree with the IMDb on this birthdate but it's always fun to think about Caligari)

1927 Oscar winning cinematographer Pasqualino de Santis born in Italy. Classics include Romeo and Juliet, The Damned, Death in Venice, and L'Argent

1930 Richard Donner, superstar director/producer of the 1980s, behind films like The Goonies, Lethal Weapon, and the first two Supermans. Apparently retired after 16 Blocks (2006) with Bruce Willis

1931 The Public Enemy starring James Cagney and Jean Harlow was enjoying its opening weekend at movie theaters. It was a big hit, ending in the top ten of its year. Variety claimed it was "low brow material" attempting to be high brow by its craftsmanship. If only critics knew in the moment -- they almost
See full article at FilmExperience »

Forget La La Land, the real goddesses of the silver screen had substance as well as style

The era was no feminist paradise for women, but stars such as Katharine Hepburn and Barbara Stanwyck proved attractive women could also be demanding and intelligent

La La Land, a favourite to win at the Oscars, has been celebrated as not only a tribute to the great films of classic Hollywood, but as a movie that might inspire audiences to rediscover them. If it does so, great. But anyone who thinks La La Land embodies the spirit of old movies hasn’t seen very many of them. It has style, but little substance. Like Woody Allen’s Café Society, similarly hailed as a love letter to classic film, these movies may look like old Hollywood, but they lack a spine, a nerve centre. They have no backbone.

When I was growing up in the 1980s, American popular culture was pretty much a wasteland of positive female images. There was no one I aspired to resemble,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

From James Dean to John Belushi to La La Land: the Secrets and Scandals of the Chateau Marmont

  • PEOPLE.com
From James Dean to John Belushi to La La Land: the Secrets and Scandals of the Chateau Marmont
La La Land’s singing and dancing stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone may be center stage in the Oscar-nominated film, but movie history buffs (and Angelenos) likely noticed another small but significant cameo right at the end when, ahem, the big thing happens. (No spoilers here.)

The Chateau Marmont, Hollywood’s most infamous hotel, makes an appearance, as the final real-life Los Angeles location featured in the film, which has been called a love letter to the city. But it’s not simply a quaint bit of nostalgia like the Rialto Theatre or Angel’s Flight.

Related: The L.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sliff 2016: Tribute to King Kong Nov. 6th – Here’s a Retrospective on the 1933 Original

A Tribute to King Kong takes place as part of the The St. Louis International Film Festival Sunday, Nov. 6 beginning at 6:00pm at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium. The first film screened will be the new documentary Long Live The King, which explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars — both literally and figuratively — in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong. Produced and directed by Frank Dietz and Trish Geiger, the creative team behind the award-winning “Beast Wishes,” the documentary devotes primary attention to the 1933 classic, celebrating the contributions of filmmakers Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, stars Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, and Bruce Cabot, writer Edgar Wallace, and especially stop-motion innovator Willis O’Brien. But Kong’s legacy is also fully detailed: the sequel “Son of Kong,” the cinematic kin “Mighty Joe Young,” the Dino DeLaurentis and Peter Jackson remakes, even the Japanese versions by Toho Studios.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Joshua Reviews John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs [Theatrical Review]

Photo by Lawrence Irvine

The name John Waters can conjure up many an image. Be it of the director himself (that mustache is as much a calling card as any of his feature films) or of his controversial films, few directors have built a cult around themselves like Waters. Best friend to the rejects, scumbags, losers and perverts, Waters and his films have become not only points of discussion for government officials lamenting about the nation’s dissolving morals but rallying points for those who live on the outside of popular culture.

And yet even he has one of those pesky “rarely seen” films that has seemingly become a forgotten curio for only the biggest of fans. That is, until Janus Films got hold of it. Entitled Multiple Maniacs, Waters marked his second feature by making a film that even had judicial figures like Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Director Hector Babenco Will Be Best Remembered For Just Two Movies, But He Was a Poet of the Downtrodden

Director Hector Babenco Will Be Best Remembered For Just Two Movies, But He Was a Poet of the Downtrodden
The late Roger Ebert called the cinema “a machine that generates empathy,” and that’s as good a definition of the power of movies as you’re likely to hear. The director Hector Babenco, who died last week at 70, made a dozen films in his lifetime, and it’s fair to say that he’ll be best remembered for just two of them: “Pixote” (1981), his ripped-from-the-gutter drama of Brazilian street kids stealing and whoring and murdering to survive, and “Kiss of the Spider Woman” (1985), a tale of two accused criminals — one a macho political prisoner, the other a drag queen who doesn’t think about politics but, in a different way, is even more of a political prisoner — who fight and talk and bond after being thrown together into the same jail cell. The first film was a scalding cry of agony and ecstasy from what used to be called
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Davis: This Is A Job For Superman

  • Comicmix
I had another piece all ready to go, but I’m just too anal to let stuff run if it bugs me. What I usually do when faced with a decision to let something I don’t feel like running just has a blown deadline.

I’m suffering from severe depression and not giving a hoot is easy when you actually don’t give a hoot. The truth is I don’t give a hoot if I meet a fucking deadline or finish an article, design a poster, fix a painting, edit a chapter, respond to Comic Con or meet with anybody.

I have no motivation to do anything for myself. Especially when faced with days like this.

Today is the 21st of June, but I’m writing this the night before.

Sorry, Mike.

Two years ago in the early hours before most people go to work I’d just
See full article at Comicmix »

From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen

  • PEOPLE.com
From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen
Orange Is the New Black returns June 17. The show has rightly earned praise for its nuanced, moving portrayals of female inmates of all stripes, and serves as a reminder of how far things have come in terms of images of incarcerated women on screen. In appreciation of series creator Jenji Kohan and the cast and crew's elevated take on the subject matter, we're looking back at the bleak and often exploitative history of the strange "women's prison drama" film genre. The portrayal of women in prison can be split - as most of Hollywood can - into two periods: Pre- and Post-Code.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen

  • PEOPLE.com
From Caged to Orange Is the New Black: A Brief History of Incarcerated Women on Screen
Orange Is the New Black returns June 17. The show has rightly earned praise for its nuanced, moving portrayals of female inmates of all stripes, and serves as a reminder of how far things have come in terms of images of incarcerated women on screen. In appreciation of series creator Jenji Kohan and the cast and crew's elevated take on the subject matter, we're looking back at the bleak and often exploitative history of the strange "women's prison drama" film genre. The portrayal of women in prison can be split - as most of Hollywood can - into two periods: Pre- and Post-Code.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sudden death of film star Jean Harlow - archive

8 June 1937: Jean Harlow was the first of Hollywood’s platinum blondes, and appeared in film after film as the tough, wise-cracking, tempestuous young woman

Hollywood, June 7.

Miss Jean Harlow, the platinum blonde film actress, died here to-day at the age of 26. She was taken ill only ten days ago with internal inflammation, and later she was stated to have almost recovered. To-day, however, she took a sudden turn for the worse. She was removed from her Beverly Hills home to hospital, where she died. The doctors say she never rallied after a relapse last night.

She had been given two blood transfusions and injections and placed in an oxygen tent, but she lapsed into a coma early to-day and never regained consciousness. The cause of death was uraemic poisoning, which spread to the brain.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Remember Gandhi? Baby Jake? Harlow?

On this day in movie related history...

1893 Mahatma Gandhi committed his first act of civil disobedience refusing to move from a whites only first class section of a train. He had a valid ticket, after all. He was forcibly ejected in South Africa's Pietermaritzburg Railway Station. This event and many others from his nonviolent revolution were reenacted by Ben Kingsley in Gandhi, Oscar's Best Picture of 1982. (You can cover a lot with a running time of 191 minutes.)

1909 Jessica Tandy is born. Steals Michelle Pfeiffer's Oscar 80 years, 9 months, and 19 days later.

1917 Rat Pack royalty Dean Martin is born. Centennial next year.

1928 Perpetually underappreciated and totally awesome director James Ivory is born. Later makes masterpieces like A Room With a View and Howards End. Where's his Honorary Oscar, AMPAS? He's 87 people get on that immediately.

1937 The original Bombshell, Jean Harlow dies suddenly at the peak of her fame at the age of 26. Where's her biopic?
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Mystery of Hattie McDaniel's Missing Oscar - and the Incredible Life of the First African-American Oscar Winner

  • PEOPLE.com
The Mystery of Hattie McDaniel's Missing Oscar - and the Incredible Life of the First African-American Oscar Winner
What happened to Hattie McDaniel's Oscar award? After McDaniel died from breast cancer in 1952 at the age of 57, the award was supposed to be donated to Howard University, per her will. The university, however, has no official record of it ever being received. McDaniel beat costar Olivia de Havilland to win Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Scarlett O'Hara's maid Mammy in the 1939 Civil War epic Gone with the Wind. So what happened then to that historic Oscar after McDaniel's death? While Howard can't confirm it ever passed through, it's possible, if not likely, that the university received the award,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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