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Honorary Oscars recipients: From Charlie Chaplin to Samuel L. Jackson

Honorary Oscars recipients: From Charlie Chaplin to Samuel L. Jackson
In 2020, the Covid pandemic caused the motion picture academy to cancel the Governors Awards, which has been a stand-alone event since 2009. Instead, it presented the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award to both Tyler Perry and the Motion Picture & Television Fund during the Oscars. This morale booster was a bright spot in the ceremony.

The Governors Awards are set to return on January 15, 2022. Honorary Oscars will be presented to multi-hyphenate Elaine May as well as actors Samuel L. Jackson and Liv Ullmann. Another actor, Danny Glover, will be feted with the Hersholt for his work on behalf of Unicef.

There have been four honorees at the Governors Awards every year but two since 2009. As detailed below, all but one of the academy’s 17 branches — Visual Effects — are represented among the roster of 138 winners of honorary Oscars. In the case of Visual Effects, the academy has presented special achievement awards to a host
See full article at Gold Derby »

Feminist take on Mata Hari among projects being showcased at the Holland Film Meeting

Feminist take on Mata Hari among projects being showcased at the Holland Film Meeting
Holland Film Meeting is the industry strand of the Netherlands Film Festival.

Paula van der Oest’s €9m English-language drama Mata Hari is among the films being presented during the Holland Film Meeting’s projects programme, the industry side of this year’s Netherlands Film Festival, which begins today (September 24) in Utrecht. It will run until October 2.

Van der Oest, promised a ”feminist approach” to the subject matter. “Most of the existing Mata Hari films are told from a male perspec­tive,” she told Screen. “They focus on Mata Hari being a glam­orous and exotic spy. A dangerous temptress,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Marion Cotillard on the #MeToo Movement: ‘It’s a True Revolution’

Marion Cotillard on the #MeToo Movement: ‘It’s a True Revolution’
Oscar-winning French actor Marion Cotillard spoke about the “revolution” led by women to shake up the patriarchy since the start of #MeToo at the San Sebastian Film Festival where she received the Donostia Award for career achievement on Friday’s opening night.

“For the past several years, the subordination of women has become increasingly unacceptable in the public eye; it’s always been so but we talk about it much more today, obviously, since #MeToo. It has allowed women to speak freely, it’s a true revolution, an intense one and I am very happy to live it,” said Cotillard, who last played opposite Adam Driver in Leos Carax’s musical drama “Annette” which won a top prize at Cannes.

“Today, as women, we know we can be supported by a community of women and men and that’s an important thing. The result is that there are indeed more women,
See full article at Variety »

Streaming: Black Widow and cinema’s best female spies

Streaming: Black Widow and cinema’s best female spies
Scarlett Johansson’s icy Marvel assassin has many hard acts to follow, from Greta Garbo’s riveting Mata Hari to Charlize Theron’s MI6 hotshot

Taken as a whole, the so-called Marvel Cinematic Universe feels like an oppressive, endlessly self-regenerating cultural monolith. Regarded individually, the films become more palatable, as they spin out into different, taste-dependent genres: the goofy bro-comedy of the last Thor film; the martial arts spectacle of the recently released Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings; the odd meta-sitcom of TV’s WandaVision.

Black Widow is Marvel’s attempt at an all-out spy thriller, belatedly following the storytelling direction for which the character Natasha Romanoff was always intended, and that never really gelled with the Avengers derring-do. In her solo vehicle – out Monday on DVD and Blu-ray, having recently hit premium VOD services after an initially exclusive Disney+ run – Scarlett Johansson is in full female Bond mode: running,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Romancing ‘The Kominsky Method’: Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner reunite

Romancing ‘The Kominsky Method’: Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner reunite
Moviegoers have been flocking to see their favorite romantic couples on the silver screen since the early days of cinema from John Gilbert and Greta Garbo, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, Olivia de Havilland and Errol Flynn, Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland and more recently Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan and Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. But none of those partnerships have endured nearly four decades. Until now.

Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner first starred together in Robert Zemeckis’ romantic 1984 comedy adventure “Romancing the Stone,” which was the eighth-highest grossing film of the year, winning the Golden Globe for best comedy or musical and Turner winning the Globe for actress in the same category. Penned by the late Diane Thomas, “Romancing” cast Turner as plain Jane romance novelist Joan Wilder, who shares her apartment with her cat. After she get a frantic call from her sister who has been kidnapped by antiquities smugglers in Columbia,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hotels and Resorts Pivot to Hosting TV Productions in Pandemic

Hotels and Resorts Pivot to Hosting TV Productions in Pandemic
Transforming a hotel or resort into a production-friendly and production-ready facility requires a major shift in dynamics. However, if there’s one thing the pandemic has instilled in the hospitality industry is the necessity to adapt and change. The pivot to production for a hotel or resort involves repurposing infrastructure, staff retraining and all importantly, adhering to upgraded safety and cleanliness standards to create a viable production bubble.

Not every hotel or resort has the requisite facilities or space to handle a major production crew overnighting on site much less handle the trucks, equipment and demand for scenic locations. Several recent resourceful examples demonstrate the creative possibilities of converting a resort into an impromptu backlot, concert venue or soundstage.

In the U.K., the 110-acre Down Hall Hotel & Spa served as production home and location for “The Great British Bake Off’” and a bio-bubble for the nearly 100-member cast and crew.
See full article at Variety »

The Fu Manchu Cycle—1965-1969

The Fu Manchu Cycle—1965-1969
The Fu Manchu Cycle—1965-1969

Blu ray

Powerhouse Indicator

1965 – 1969 / 96, 93, 91, 94, 92 min. / 2:33:1, 1:85, 1:66

Starring Christoper Lee, Tsai Chin

Cinematography by Ernest Steward, John Von Kotze, Manuel Merino

Directed by Don Sharp, Jeremy Summers, Jesús Franco

Arthur Henry Ward was born in Birmingham in 1883—at the age of 20 he adopted the pen name of Sax Rohmer, specializing in standard issue crime fiction and otherworldly tales of terror. In 1912 he folded both genres into one sinister figure from the East, a so-called “devil doctor” named Fu Manchu. The book covers alone were xenophobic horror shows and if there was any doubt the stories themselves were wildly racist, the author confirmed it in the description of his star villain: “the Yellow Peril incarnate in one man.”

An authority on philosophy, medicine, and idiosyncratic torture devices, Manchu made his debut in The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu which was quickly followed by The Return of Dr.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Greta Garbo: The Star Who Upheld Her Image as Hollywood’s Most Mysterious Figure for Six Decades

Greta Garbo: The Star Who Upheld Her Image as Hollywood’s Most Mysterious Figure for Six Decades
On Nov. 27, 1929, three years after Greta Garbo’s American film debut, Variety described her as “the most mysterious of Hollywood stars.” More than 50 years later, in 1981, a Variety story began “Given that Greta Garbo still remains the most elusive, mysterious and speculated about film personality on the planet…”

It’s rare for any star to maintain public interest for so long. And it’s especially notable that she maintained interest, even decades after her final film, by trying to avoid attention.

In a career of only 15 years, Garbo gave fans her acting talent but nothing of herself — no details of her life, never addressing rumors or speculation. In a brief 1929 item, Variety said “Practically nothing has ever been known personally about Miss Garbo, she being a publicity-shunner and the toughest of all stars to interview.” In her heyday, she had as much impact on fashion and daydreams as Lady Gaga and Beyonce,
See full article at Variety »

Norma Shearer, the First Lady of MGM

Norma Shearer, the First Lady of MGM
by Cláudio Alves

It's odd that so few people talk about Norma Shearer nowadays. This Academy Award-winning actress was once one of the greatest stars of moviedom, First Lady of MGM, Queen of the Lot. Her arch elegance typified the glamour of Old Hollywood, while her evolving acting style often reflected and predicted the trends of the industry. She was a phenomenon, a sensation, a diva, but her modern recognition pales in comparison to many of her contemporaries like Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, and others.

Since we're celebrating 1938 and that was the year when she got the last of her five or six Oscar nominations (depending on how you count her double from 1930), it's a good time to look back at the life and films of Norma Shearer…
See full article at FilmExperience »

The City Without Jews

The City Without Jews
A major silent film find: recently rediscovered and restored, this much-sought Austrian satire offers historical insight on antisemitism in 1920s Europe, and by extension today’s anti-immigrant politics. A fictitious city decides that the solution to its ills is to expel its Jewish population. That exact premise would in just a few years become political reality in the hands of fascist murderers.

The City Without Jews

Blu-ray + DVD

Flicker Alley

1924 / B&w / 1:33 Silent Ap. / 91 min. / Die Stadt ohne Juden / Street Date August 25, 2020 / 39.95

Starring: Eugen Neufeld, Hans Moser, Anny Milety, Johannes Riemann, Ferdinand Mayerhofer, Mizi Griebl, Karl Tema, Hans Effenberger, Gisela Werbisek, and Armin Berg.

Camera: Hugo Eywo, Eduard von Borsody

Sets: Julius von Borsody

Original Music scores: Donald Sosin and Alicia Svigals / Olga Neuwirth

Written by Ida Jenbach, Hans Karl Breslauer from the novel by Hugo Bettauer

Directed by Hans Karl Breslauer

Just off the 10 Freeway on the West side of Los Angeles,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Comment Party: Best Actress, 1930s

Comment Party: Best Actress, 1930s
Who is your favourite from each year in the 1930s? My current votes go like so though there are always more films to see so one must always reserve the right to change one's mind.

1930 Norma Shearer, The Divorcee 1931 Marie Dressler, Min & Bill 1932 Marlene Dietrich, Blonde Venus 1933 Greta Garbo, Queen Christina 1934 Claudette Colbert, It Happened One Night 1935 Katharine Hepburn, Alice Adams 1936 Carole Lombard, My Man Godfrey 1937 Irene Dunne, The Awful Truth 1938 Bette Davis, Jezebel 1939 Vivien Leigh, Gone With the Wind (though I'll admit to being somewhat torn because Dark Victory is my favourite pre 1950s Bette Davis performance)
See full article at FilmExperience »

France’s Lumiere Festival Confirms Dates, Michel Audiard, Clarence Brown Tributes

France’s Lumiere Festival Confirms Dates, Michel Audiard, Clarence Brown Tributes
In a reaffirmation of its ambitions to hold an on-site event this year, France’s Lumière Festival, run by filmmaker and film historian Bertrand Tavernier and Cannes Festival head Thierry Frémaux, has formally announced dates for its 2020 edition

The Lumière Festival 2020 has also unveiled its first program highlights: Tributes to French screenwriter Michel Audiard and to Clarence Brown, maybe the least known of Hollywood Silent Era “name” directors.

Running Oct. 10-18, the 12th Lumière Festival will take place “in movie theaters and the environs of Lyon, the festival announced Thursday in a written statement.

It could hardly be otherwise. Steered by Tavernier and Frémaux, the president and director of Lyon’s Lumière Institute, the Lumière Festival punched 200,000 admissions in 2019, despite a robust focus on classic film restorations, re-issues and retrospectives.

Key to that has been the presence in cinema theaters and on the streets of Lyon of some of the
See full article at Variety »

Adrian, God of Glamour

Adrian, God of Glamour
by Cláudio Alves

Born Adrian Adolph Greenberg, the designer best known as Adrian was one of the most influential costumers in Hollywood history. After working in his family business of millinery, Adrian went on to study costume design in New York and Paris and later found work dressing the starlets of Broadway. His talents soon took him to Hollywood, where he found a home from the mid-1920s to the 1940s, designing the costumes for many an MGM classic. Throughout his tenure in Tinsel Town, Adrian perfected the on and offscreen looks of such great divas as Greta Garbo, Norma Shearer, Myrna Loy, Jean Harlow, Vivien Leigh, Ingrid Bergman, Lana Turner, Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr, and others. Among them, his most essential collaborator and muse was the one and only Joan Crawford…
See full article at FilmExperience »

Dissolves in Time: Close-Up on Billy Wilder’s "Fedora"

Dissolves in Time: Close-Up on Billy Wilder’s
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Billy Wilder's Fedora (1978) is now showing May 3 - June 2, 2020 in most countries in the series Perfect Failures.In the diaries of Charles Brackett (1892-1969), Billy Wilder’s first major Hollywood collaborator, we discover much—even if cryptically notated—about the art and craft of screenwriting. For instance, Brackett frequently refers to how he and Wilder would rework scenes over and over, in a process he calls “three-dimentionalization” [sic]. Above all, Brackett worried over what he enigmatically called the “dissolves” in any filmic storyline. He didn’t mean literal, visual, on-screen dissolves; I suspect he was referring to any unwieldy “hole” or ellipsis in a plot where something needed to be skipped, but still had to be somehow explained, accounted for. The more direct, linear, and un-holey a screenplay could be, the better for Brackett.But Wilder—who parted company
See full article at MUBI »

Netflix’s Hollywood Episode 5 – Easter Egg and Reference Guide

Netflix’s Hollywood Episode 5 – Easter Egg and Reference Guide
This article contains Hollywood spoilers. You can find the easter egg guide for the previous episode here.

In what might be the most glamorous episode of Hollywood yet, George Hurrell’s decadent photo sessions get name checked, and (probably) Mickey Cohen’s mob gets involved. Let’s get cracking at those eggs!

Hollywood Episode 5

-The episode begins with Avis and company lamenting how terrible Walt Disney’s Song of the South is. And they’re not wrong, although one of its stars, Hattie McDaniel, is about to get a pretty glamorous treatment beginning in this episode…

-As production of Meg gets underway, we hear Ethel Merman’s iconic “There’s No Business Like Show Business” playing.

-We are also introduced to Queen Latifah as Hattie McDaniel… and she’s in a three way with a man and woman?! This is based on speculation and rumors that she was part of
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Intrigue

The Intrigue
Look out, it’s an X-Ray Death Ray! We rushed this review out, and it’s only 104 years late. One of the feature films on a new disc devoted to an unheralded woman filmmaker is The Intrigue, a nascent science-fiction thriller of the ‘deadly invention’ variety. It’s all from 1916, when WW1 was being fought. Julia Crawford Ivers’ adept screenplay offers good espionage twists and Frank Lloyd’s direction incorporates some interesting visual effects. The show stays smart until a ‘pacifist finale’ that will elicit justified jeers from the hawkish among us.

The Intrigue

Part of the Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers Series

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber Kino Classics

1916 / B&w with Tints / 1:33 Silent Ap. / 64 min. (197 minutes in all) / Street Date March 17, 2020 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Lenore Ulric, Cecil Van Auker, Howard Davies, Florence Vidor, Paul Weigel, Herbert Standing.

Cinematography: James Van Trees

Written by Julia Crawford Ivers

Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street’: Film Review

‘Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street’: Film Review
In 1985, New Line rushed out a sequel to its breakout horror hit of the prior year. But while commercially successful enough, “A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge” was initially disliked by mainstream horror fans, then later won cult status, for the same reason: It struck many as “the gayest horror film of all time,” with content that was either homoerotic or homophobic or both, depending on your view.

Breaking from slasher-genre norms, its protagonist wasn’t a “Final Girl” but a cute, blond, “sensitive” high school boy for whom Robert Englund’s murderous Freddy often seemed to be a metaphor: A flaming little secret Jesse doesn’t want to “come out,” and which only the love of the girl next door (Kim Myers) can save him from. Lead Mark Patton was a closeted gay actor who considered the film’s ambivalent sexual agenda publicly “outed” him. Documentary “Scream,
See full article at Variety »

‘The Times of Bill Cunningham’ Film Review: Documentary on Famous Photographer Lacks Focus

‘The Times of Bill Cunningham’ Film Review: Documentary on Famous Photographer Lacks Focus
“The only way to last is never to let anyone really know you,” photographer Bill Cunningham wrote at the end of his memoir “Fashion Climbing,” published posthumously after his death in 2016. There was a documentary made about Cunningham in 2010 called “Bill Cunningham New York,” which followed him as he took street fashion photos for The New York Times, and now we get this new film from director Mark Bozek, which is centered on an interview Bozek did with Cunningham in 1994. Cunningham remains elusive in both of these films and in his book, and the reason for that feels fairly obvious.

Asked about romantic relationships in “Bill Cunningham New York,” Cunningham replied, “Do you want to know if I’m gay?” He deflected this question, saying it “never occurred to me.” In “The Times of Bill Cunningham,” he speaks briefly about his conservative upbringing in Boston and how his parents disapproved
See full article at The Wrap »

Private Fictions: A Spotlight on Neighboring Scenes

Above: LemebelIn Joanna Reposi Garibaldi’s documentary, Lemebel—an ardent homage to the Chilean artist, essayist and queer activist Pedro Lemebel that opens Neighboring Scenes festival dedicated to Latin American cinema—Lemebel looks at the black-and-white photograph of his adolescent self and his mother, leaning into each other, and croons repeatedly, “My mommy… my mommy.” It’s a moment so whispery and delicate a filmmaker less attuned to its emotional portent would have probably edited it out. But Garibaldi clearly sees her work as a farewell not just to the artist but also the person, an emphasis on affect that cuts across the various programs. When Garibaldi’s film opens, Lemebel, who passed away in 2015, from laryngeal cancer, is already quite frail. His physical state makes for a poignant contrast to his intellectual vitality, as demonstrated in clips from his lectures, and also to the provocative and often taxing nature of his early performances.
See full article at MUBI »

Scarlett Johansson at Oscars: 11 performers who got lead and supporting nominations in the same year

Scarlett Johansson at Oscars: 11 performers who got lead and supporting nominations in the same year
With her Best Actress nomination for “Marriage Story” and her Best Supporting Actress bid for “Jojo Rabbit,” Scarlett Johansson joined an elite group of performers to score multiple Oscar noms in the same year. It’s of special note in Johansson’s case, considering both are her career-first citations from the academy.

Who are the other actors and actresses to pull off this neat trick? Tour our photo gallery to see all 10 people, with each person listed from most recent to furthest back. By the way, only two of this nominees went home on Oscar night without a trophy for either category, which could be good news for ScarJo.

SEEScarlett Johansson movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

In the early years of the Oscars, there were no rules preventing performers for competing multiple times in the same category. As a result, the 1929/1930 ceremony found George Arliss (“Disraeli” and
See full article at Gold Derby »
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