Albert Finney - News Poster

News

Gumshoe

When is a private eye parody not a parody? Stephen Frears’ first feature strikes a delicate balance — its nearly absurd hardboiled lingo outdoes the spoofs, but the story and characters are pitched 100% straight. Albert Finney Is Eddie Ginley, surrounded by a pack of exciting, imaginatively cast actors.

Gumshoe

Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator

1971 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 88 min. / / Street Date March 19, 2018 / available from Powerhouse Films UK / £15.99

Starring: Albert Finney, Billie Whitelaw, Frank Finlay, Janice Rule, Carolyn Seymour, Fulton Mackay, George Innes, George Silver, Bill Dean, Wendy Richard, Maureen Lipman, Neville Smith, Oscar James.

Cinematography: Chris Menges

Film Editor: Charles Rees

Original Music: Andrew Lloyd Webber

Written by Neville Smith

Produced by Michael Medwin, Albert Finney

Directed by Stephen Frears

At first one thinks it’s a parody, and not a very good one. Then we wonder if Albert Finney is simply taking his Humphrey Bogart imitation out for a walk, as when he
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Furniture: Demolition and Preservation in The Molly Maguires

Daniel Walber's series on Production Design. Click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Every now and then, while poring over lists of Oscar nominees from years past, you stumble across a movie you’ve never heard of. Not even once. In 1970, the Best Art Direction category included two big war movies (Patton and Tora! Tora! Tora!), another hit Best Picture nominee (Airport) and Scrooge, the musical adaptation of A Christmas Carol starring Albert Finney. Then there’s The Molly Maguires, the only one not nominated in any other category.

So what’s The Molly Maguires? Well, for one thing, it wasn’t a hit. But that may have been more a result of the film’s dour subject matter than its quality. It stars Richard Harris as a real life undercover Pinkerton Detective, tasked with infiltrating a group of Irish industrial terrorists in 1870s Pennsylvania coal country.
See full article at FilmExperience »

From Top Gun to Stand By Me – why the 1980s is my favourite film decade

It was the best of times for action, romance, teen and time-travel movies. It was also surprisingly liberal and diverse. But most of all it was fun

•Read the rest of My favourite film decade

I’m such a raging narcissist (or sociopath) that I generally assume my taste is the same as everyone else’s. How can people possibly think differently from me? Obviously everyone prefers Albert Finney’s Poirot to David Suchet’s Poirot, Blur to Oasis, hard cheese to soft cheese, Anchorman to Knocked Up, 80s goofball Tom Hanks to 90s Oscar winner Tom Hanks, right? Right?

So when I was asked to write about my favourite decade for films I sighed and said, “Well, I guess the 80s have already been taken, right?” Because, obviously, my favourite film decade is everyone’s favourite film decade, right?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Nicol Williamson: Troubled Genius

  • CinemaRetro
(Author Gabriel Hershman has written "Black Sheep: the Authorized Biography of Nicol Williamson" (The History Press). Williamson, who passed away in 2011 at age 75, was an enormous talent. John Osborne called him "The greatest actor since Brando". However, he had many personal demons that sidetracked what should have been a far more successful career. Hershman explores the peaks and valleys of this temperamental man's dramatic life and career and in this article reminds us of why his talents and work should be rediscovered.)

By Gabriel Hershman

Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

Peter O’Toole, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed, Alan Bates, Albert Finney, Tom Courtenay and … Nicol Williamson. Just a few of the most influential actors of their generation.

Were you surprised when I mentioned Nicol’s name? He was, at the time of his death, the least well known of that generation of actors. And yet, in my opinion,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?
The Shape of Water” is one of two Best Picture Oscar nominees with three acting nominations — the other being “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — but star Sally Hawkins and supporting players Octavia Spencer and Richard Jenkins are not predicted to win any of them. If they indeed go 0-3 on Sunday and “The Shape of Water” takes the top prize, the fantasy drama will join eight other Best Picture champs that did not convert any of its three-plus acting nominations into wins.

“Birdman” (2014) was the most recent Best Picture winner not to carry an acting award from at least three nominations, as Michael Keaton, Emma Stone and Edward Norton fell to Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”), Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) and J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”), respectively. Arquette and Simmons were the supporting frontrunners all season, but Keaton was locked in a tight Best Actor race with Redmayne until the SAG Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Week: Gary Oldman is Winston Churchill in ‘Darkest Hour’

Chicago – He has been cleaning up in the preliminary awards so far in 2018, and he’s an odds-on favorite to take the Oscar for Best Actor on Sunday, March 4th. Veteran actor Gary Oldman donned make-up and found the right accent to portray Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour” (also nominated for the Best Picture).

The title refers to one of the most challenging moments of Churchill’s career. Newly minted as Britain’s prime minister in 1940, he faces the onslaught of Adolf Hitler’s attack on his homeland, including the surrounding of the British troops at Dunkirk. Gary Oldman embodies the pugnacious bulldog that characterized Churchill at the height of his power, including the soaring rhetoric that strengthened the morale of the British people.

Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour

Photo credit: Focus Features

Oldman was born in London, studied acting with the Young People’s Theatre and made
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Tom Jones

Tom Jones

Blu ray

Criterion

1963 / 1:66 / 128 Min. / Street Date February 27, 2018

Starring Albert Finney, Susannah York, Hugh Griffith

Cinematography by Walter Lassally

Screenplay by Tony Richardson, John Osborne

Music by John Addison

Edited by Antony Gibbs

Produced by Tony Richardson

Directed by Tony Richardson

Yorkshire native Tony Richardson, lauded for a string of melodramas set in grayer than gray factory towns, took an abrupt left turn with Tom Jones, an 18th century period piece steeped in the vibrant New Wave sensibilities of the 60’s. Starring Albert Finney as the randy hero, Richardson’s sunny holiday is as far from the mills of Derbyshire as Buckingham Palace.

Based on Henry Fielding’s mock epic, Richardson and co-writer John Osborne took a Cliff’s Notes approach to Fielding’s picaresque narrative, whittling Tom’s journey down to a two hour jaunt set in motion by Irish actor Micheál Mac Liammóir’s wry narration.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Greatest Romantic Scenes In Movies

Filmgoers still want some romance up on the big screen in the local cinemas. As is evident in this weekend’s box office, Fifty Shades Freed, the last film in the ‘Fifty Shades’ trilogy, pushed the franchise over the $1 billion mark globally with a number one debut bringing in $98.1 million in overseas and $38.8 million in North America for a combined worldwide total of $136.9 million.

Need a film to watch with your sweetheart this Valentine’s Day?

While this genre isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, there’s no denying the emotional impact of these scenes that make them noteworthy. If you’re still searching for that special movie, here’s a sampling of scenes from romantic films.

Nothing says enduring love better than the story of Braveheart and the Scot who gave his body and soul to his country and woman he loved. William gives Muron the thistle she
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?
The Shape of Water” numbers three acting bids among its leading 13 Academy Awards nominations for lead Sally Hawkins and supporting players Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer. According to our exclusive Oscar odds none of them is predicted to win on March 4. Should that scenario play out, does that mean that their film won’t win Best Picture?

Not so fast.

While 53 of the 89 Best Picture champs to date include an Oscar-winning performance, 36 of them (40%) did not win any acting awards. And among those three dozen winners are four of the eight films — “The Hurt Locker” (2009), “Argo” (2012), “Birdman” (2015) and “Spotlight” (2016) — decided by preferential ballot under the newly expanded slate of Best Picture nominees.

Surprisingly, an even dozen of the Best Picture winners did not even reap any acting nominations. That is welcome news for “Arrival,” which does not number an acting bid among its eight nominations. However, four of those films
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’

  • Gold Derby
Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’
Gary Oldman might finally win his first career Oscar in March for his role as Winston Churchill in the film “Darkest Hour.” Surprisingly it’s only his second Oscar nomination after his first for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, also as Best Actor. Where does his latest movie rank among his greatest of all time in our photo gallery (view above)?

Despite his long and very successful film career Oldman hasn’t been recognized very often by awards groups. He received one Emmy nomination (for a guest appearance on “Friends” of all things) but has never even been nominated for a Golden Globe. Back in his native country of England, the BAFTAs have nominated him twice before this year as an actor (for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “Prick up Your Ears”) and awarded him two trophies for a film he directed called “Nil by Mouth” (he won for the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gary Oldman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Gary Oldman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Gary Oldman might finally win his first career Oscar in March for his role as Winston Churchill in the film “Darkest Hour.” Surprisingly it’s only his second Oscar nomination after his first for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, also as Best Actor. Where does his latest movie rank among his greatest of all time in our photo gallery (view above)?

Despite his long and very successful film career Oldman hasn’t been recognized very often by awards groups. He received one Emmy nomination (for a guest appearance on “Friends” of all things) but has never even been nominated for a Golden Globe. Back in his native country of England, the BAFTAs have nominated him twice before this year as an actor (for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “Prick up Your Ears”) and awarded him two trophies for a film he directed called “Nil by Mouth” (he won for the
See full article at Gold Derby »

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?
With their wins at Sunday’s Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”) and Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) continue their march toward becoming the first foursome to sweep the Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice, SAG, BAFTA and Oscar. Their SAG victories are the most important ones of the three groups so far, as the SAGs have a fantastic correlation with the Oscars; SAG has only missed five times in Best Actor, six times in Best Actress, nine times in Best Supporting Actor and seven times in Best Supporting Actress. But despite so much overlap between the individual races, SAG does not go 4-for-4 with Oscar in one season as often as you might think.

Over its 23-year history, SAG has only had a direct match in all four Oscar acting races six times, most recently three years ago. SAG typically goes 3-for-4 with Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gary Oldman (‘Darkest Hour’) at the SAG Awards: Can a real Brit finally win for playing Winston Churchill?

Gary Oldman (‘Darkest Hour’) at the SAG Awards: Can a real Brit finally win for playing Winston Churchill?
Everything this awards season has been going Gary Oldman’s way. He’s already won the Golden Globe and Critics’ Choice Award for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour.” And he is currently the overwhelming favorite to win the SAG Award. But are we overly confident he’ll win? No Brit has won for playing the famous prime minister. Check out our gallery above of all the actors who’ve brought Churchill to the small and big screens.

Playing Churchill has proven to be a great way to win an Emmy as Albert Finney (“The Gathering Storm,” 2002), Brendan Gleeson (“Into the Storm,” 2009) and John Lithgow (“The Crown,” 2017) all won in a span of 15 years for their interpretations of the iconic figure. But ironically only an American — Lithgow — also won a SAG Award.

For Finney, who had already won an Emmy and Golden Globe, it was a matter of timing.
See full article at Gold Derby »

The underrated film acting performances of 2017

Mark Harrison Jan 2, 2018

Gemma Arterton, Daniel Craig, Chris Evans and Carla Gugino are amongst our pick of the underrated acting work of 2017...

This review contains spoilers for Paddington 2, Spider-Man Homecoming, Split, Star Wars: The Last Jedi and War For The Planet Of The Apes.

2017 was a great year for film, and a tremendous one for genre films in particular. As you can probably tell from the composition of our writers' top films of the year list, there was no shortage of interesting, unique or just plain great films tailored to genre fans of all stripes in the last twelve months.

However, even as Hollywood spends the first two months of each year patting themselves on the back, this kind of film rarely translates into awards, at least outside of the technical categories. Guillermo del Toro's The Shape Of Water, which doesn't hit UK cinemas until February, should be this year's breakthrough film,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Gary Oldman: will Churchill prove to be his finest hour? | The Observer profile

The dazzling British actor, often mentioned in the same breath as Daniel Day-Lewis, is tipped for a Golden Globe for his role as a national saviour, a long journey from playing punks and skinheads

The 1980s was a dazzling era for young, explosive British actors and two of the brightest fireworks in the box were Gary Oldman and Daniel Day-Lewis. They followed parallel trajectories: a 1960s childhood in south-east London, acclaimed stage work in the 1970s and on in the next decade to screen performances that gave homegrown cinema its equivalents to Method heavyweights such as Robert De Niro and Al Pacino, as well as successors to angry young men such as Albert Finney and Malcolm McDowell. (McDowell’s confrontational performance in The Raging Moon inspired Oldman to become an actor.)

They will compete next month in a Brit-off at the Golden Globes for the best actor prize, with the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Why Winston Churchill Continues To Fascinate

Neil Calloway looks at why Britain’s wartime leader is rarely off our screens…

It’s a great pub quiz question; which character has been played by Brendan Gleeson, Timothy Spall, Michael Gambon, Albert Finney, Brian Cox and Christian Slater?

The answer is, of course, Winston Churchill. I normally roll my eyes when I go to a preview screening of something and a member of the public asks a question, it almost inevitably being both pretentious and with little bearing on what we’ve just seen, but last year, after a screening of the TV drama Churchill’s Secret, someone asked if Winston Churchill was becoming a modern Hamlet; the role that every actor wants to play at some point. There’s some truth to that assertion.

Now, with the upcoming release of Darkest Hour, we can add Gary Oldman to the list of those who have played Britain’s wartime leader.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gary Oldman Got ‘Serious Nicotine Poisoning’ By Smoking 400 Cigars To Play Winston Churchill In ‘Darkest Hour’

Sir Winston Churchill has been portrayed by numerous actors over the years, ranging from Albert Finney’s portrayal of the British Prime Minister in HBO’s “The Gathering Storm” to John Lithgow’s Emmy-winning portrayal in Netflix series “The Crown”. The most recent actor to play Churchill is Gary Oldman in “Darkest Hour”, yet Oldman can lay claim […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Interview, Audio: Gary Oldman is Winston Churchill in ‘Darkest Hour’

Chicago – Gary Oldman has been generating memorable film portrayals since he broke through in the 1980s. From Sid Vicious (“Sid and Nancy”) to Lee Harvey Oswald (“JFK”) to Jim Gordon (Dark Knight Series), Oldman is a consummate actor. That is expressed in his latest role, as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour.”

The title refers to one of the most challenging moments of Churchill’s career. Newly minted as Britain’s prime minister in 1940, he faces the onslaught of Adolf Hitler’s attack on his homeland, including the surrounding of the British troops at Dunkirk. Gary Oldman embodies the pugnacious bulldog that characterized Churchill at the height of his power, including the soaring rhetoric that strengthened the morale of the British people.

Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour

Photo credit: Focus Features

Oldman was born in London, studied acting with the Young People’s Theatre and made his professional
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Dan Stevens: 'Dickens could be bleak, but also very silly'

He’s got debts, writer’s block, and a child on the way; a new film tells how Charles Dickens beat the odds to write everyone’s favourite Christmas story. Its star Dan Stevens reveals how he brought the writer to life

In the pecking order of Christmas stories, A Christmas Carol is second only to the baby Jesus. Even if you’ve never read it, or had it read to you, you know about that flinty-hearted miser Ebenezer Scrooge and his redemption during one long dark night of the soul.

Bill Murray, Albert Finney, Michael Caine and Alastair Sim have all played Scrooge in one of the endless film remakes and reboots there have been over the years. Now comes the story behind the story, The Man Who Invented Christmas: a heavily fictionalised biopic with Dan Stevens playing Charles Dickens, bashing out A Christmas Carol in six weeks
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Man Who Invented Christmas’ Review: Dan Stevens & Christopher Plummer Turn Scrooge Origin Tale Into A Holiday Treat

‘Man Who Invented Christmas’ Review: Dan Stevens & Christopher Plummer Turn Scrooge Origin Tale Into A Holiday Treat
I can’t even begin to recount the endless number of film, TV and stage projects that have tried to bring Charles Dickens’ immortal yuletide classic A Christmas Carol to life. From Alastair Sim’s textbook portrayal to the likes of Bill Murray, Jim Carrey, Albert Finney, the Muppets and even Mr. Magoo, you might think you’ve seen it all, but now along comes a complete original and a breath of fresh air to the saga of Ebeneezer Scrooge and the ghosts of Christmas Past…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites