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Foreplays #7: Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville’s "Liberté et Patrie"

  • MUBI
Foreplays is a column that explores under-known short films by renowned directors. Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville's Liberté et Patrie (2002) is free to watch below. Mubi's retrospective For Ever Godard is showing from November 12, 2017 - January 16, 2018 in the United States.I. One of the most beautiful essay films ever made, Liberté et Patrie (2002) turns out to also be one of the most accessible collaborations of Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville. The deeply moving lyricism of this short may astonish even those spectators who arrive to it casually, without any prior knowledge of the filmmakers’s oeuvre. Contrary to other works by the couple, Liberté et Patrie is built on a recognizable narrative strong enough to easily accommodate all the unconventionalities of the piece: a digressive structure full of bursts of undefined emotion; an unpredictable rhythm punctuated by sudden pauses, swift accelerations, intermittent blackouts and staccatos; a mélange of materials where
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‘Murder on the Orient Express’: Kenneth Branagh Embraced Agatha Christie and the Immersive Spectacle of 65mm

  • Indiewire
‘Murder on the Orient Express’: Kenneth Branagh Embraced Agatha Christie and the Immersive Spectacle of 65mm
It’s been a banner year for 65mm film — first “Dunkirk” (predominantly shot with IMAX film cameras) and now “Murder on the Orient Express” (shot with the last four existing Panavision 65mm cameras). And both involved Kenneth Branagh as actor and actor-director, respectively.

However, his dual role as master conductor of this celebrated murder mystery and as Hercule Poirot, Agatha Christie’s famed Belgian detective, is more than a mere nostalgia trip. It’s a reminder that the theme of revenge is as relevant today as it was in the 1930s, and that 65mm film can be upgraded to today’s immersive experience. (There were about two dozen 70mm prints struck for exclusive engagements globally, including the ArcLight Hollywood.)

Featuring an all-star cast of suspects (Tom Bateman, Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, Derek Jacobi, Leslie Odom Jr., Michelle Pfeiffer, and Daisy Ridley) and a vainly mustachioed Poirot,
See full article at Indiewire »

Hallucinating history: when Stalin and Eisenstein reinvented a revolution

Ten years after the storming of the Winter Palace, Sergei Eisenstein’s surreal and savage epic October reimagined Russia’s 1917 revolt – and parodied Stalin, who had commissioned it. We revisit its explosive unruliness

Coleridge said that seeing the fiery Edmund Kean act was “like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning”. Watching Sergei Eisenstein’s classic silent film October is like watching the Russian revolution the same way. It’s surreally lit up by stark images that sear your retina; gone the next second, to be replaced by others just as mysterious and disorientating. October is not a historical document, more a remembered dream. I sometimes wish we could see it without music, with just a deafening thunderbolt on each of its 3,200 cuts. A violent electrical storm of strangeness.

The film was commissioned in Stalin’s Soviet Russia for the 10th anniversary of the 1917 October revolution, as a suitably fervent propagandist celebration.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Essential Vampire Films

In readiness for Halloween, Tom Jolliffe takes a look at the essential Vampire films…

With that thing coming up that takes place on the last day in October. You know the one? Yeah, candy sales go through the roof, your house gets egged and toilet papered. Meanwhile you sacrifice a chicken over a Ouji board in the hope of getting Kevin James to stop making films. It never works and you just unleash hell on Earth (or to put it another way, a new Kevin James film comes out). With that in mind, I thought it’d be a good time to look over the best Vampire films around.Why Vampires? Well I was watching a film (that will appear on this list) and had a brainwave.

So without further ado, and not in any particular order, here are the essential Vampire films!

Nosferatu (1922)

This iconic piece of cinema remains
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rushes. Jeanne Moreau & Sam Shepard, "mother!", Femme Fatales

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Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSTwo legends lost this week: actress Jeanne Moreau at 89 and playwright, screenwriter and actor Sam Shepard at 73. That's Moreau, above, with director Michelangelo Antonioni on the set of the great La notte (1961).Recommended Viewing"What brings you to us?" Good question—we know next to nothing about Darren Aronofsky's new film mother! other than that it stars Jennifer Lawrence. The first teaser trailer doesn't help much, but we wish we were attending the Venice Film Festival to catch the premiere.We're intoxicated by the punk-noir trailer for F.J. Ossang's new film, 9 Doigts (9 Fingers), which is premiering later this week at the Locarno Film Festival.Fun of a different kind can be found in the trailer the Coen brothers-scripted, George Clooney-directed Suburbicon. It's headed to Venice as well.If you enjoyed Mubi's
See full article at MUBI »

Why David Lynch Has Become the Most Important Actor on ‘Twin Peaks’

Why David Lynch Has Become the Most Important Actor on ‘Twin Peaks’
There are two passages in episode 11 of “Twin Peaks: The Return” that perfectly crystallize why the show, in all of its various iterations, has always been so special. One is a sequence, the other is a single shot. The sequence epitomizes David Lynch’s novel approach to narrative — the shot illustrates how that approach has evolved over the last 25 years, and why David Lynch (the actor) has become so invaluable to David Lynch (the storyteller).

The sequence begins in a small town diner. Three people are wedged into a booth along the wall: A waitress, her police officer ex-husband, and their bleary-eyed adult daughter. They slouch in their seats like they’re unsure of the roles they’re supposed to play, their alien posture suggesting that it might have been years since the last time they all sat down together for a meaningful heart-to-heart — since the last time they felt like a family.
See full article at Indiewire »

Robin Williams Chair in Comedy at USC Creates a Home for Students

Robin Williams Chair in Comedy at USC Creates a Home for Students
Even though Robin Williams was cited by Montreal’s Just for Laughs Comedy Festival co-founder Andy Nulman as “the one who got away,” who, despite decades of pursuing him for a fest slot, never made it to the Montreal comedy gathering, the impact of the legendary comic’s work will undoubtedly be felt in all corners of the comedy world for years to come.

Director and producer Barnet Kellman was in Chicago shooting the 1992 romantic comedy “Straight Talk,” starring Dolly Parton, James Woods and Griffin Dunne, when Robin Williams stopped by to say greet to the cast and crew.

“Everybody turned and listened,” recalls Kellman, “as Robin uncorked his comedy for 15 straight minutes. He was a magical presence.”

So Kellman “never ever imagined” that decades later he would be named the inaugural holder of the Robin Williams Endowed Chair in Comedy at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, where Kellman, professor
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Review: Endless Poetry returns cult director Alejandro Jodorowsky to his favorite subject: himself

More wigs, more mandarin collars, more anachronisms, more phalluses, more Jungian megalomania: The octogenarian, Chilean-born director, comics writer, and guru Alejandro Jodorowsky (The Holy Mountain, El Topo) continues to plumb his early life in Endless Poetry, the sequel to his autobiographical comeback of sorts, The Dance Of Reality. The time is now the early 1940s. The teenage, still virginal Alejandro (Jeremias Herskovits and Adan Jodorowsky, the latter closer to 40) is ready to leave behind his macho father, Jaime (Brontis Jodorowsky), and his long-suffering mother, Sara (Pamela Flores, who sings all of her lines in operatic soprano), to make it as an avant-garde poet in the bohemian circles of Santiago. He is properly outfitted with a futurist collarless jacket—the start of a lifelong love affair, perhaps—and one of those Jean Cocteau or Sergei Eisenstein Bride Of Frankenstein ’dos that attached themselves to the heads of artistic white men ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Money Is the Devil: Church Satirized in Enjoyable Early Lubitsch Comedy with Premise Similar to Keaton Classic

Money Is the Devil: Church Satirized in Enjoyable Early Lubitsch Comedy with Premise Similar to Keaton Classic
'The Doll' with Ossi Oswalda and Hermann Thimig: Early Ernst Lubitsch satirical fantasy starring 'the German Mary Pickford' has similar premise to that of the 1925 Buster Keaton comedy 'Seven Chances.' 'The Doll': San Francisco Silent Film Festival presented fast-paced Ernst Lubitsch comedy starring the German Mary PickfordOssi Oswalda Directed by Ernst Lubitsch (So This Is Paris, The Wedding March), the 2017 San Francisco Silent Film Festival presentation The Doll / Die Puppe (1919) has one of the most amusing mise-en-scènes ever recorded. The set is created by cut-out figures that gradually come to life; then even more cleverly, they commence the fast-paced action. It all begins when a shy, confirmed bachelor, Lancelot (Hermann Thimig), is ordered by his rich uncle (Max Kronert), the Baron von Chanterelle, to marry for a large sum of money. As to be expected, mayhem ensues. Lancelot is forced to flee from the hordes of eligible maidens, eventually
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Forgotten Early Female Documentarian and That Talkies Began Long Before 'The Jazz Singer'

'Amazing Tales from the Archives': Pioneering female documentarian Aloha Wanderwell Baker remembered at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival – along with the largely forgotten sound-on-cylinder technology and the Jean Desmet Collection. 'Amazing Tales from the Archives': San Francisco Silent Film Festival & the 'sound-on-cylinder' system Fans of the earliest sound films would have enjoyed the first presentation at the 2017 San Francisco Silent Film Festival, held June 1–4: “Amazing Tales from the Archives,” during which Library of Congress' Nitrate Film Vault Manager George Willeman used a wealth of enjoyable film clips to examine the Thomas Edison Kinetophone process. In the years 1913–1914, long before The Jazz Singer and Warner Bros.' sound-on-disc technology, the sound-on-cylinder system invaded the nascent film industry with a collection of “talkies.” The sound was scratchy and muffled, but “recognizable.” Notably, this system focused on dialogue, rather than music or sound effects. As with the making of other recordings at the time, the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sfsff: Amazing Tales of the Archives

Sfsff 2017 featured films by or with Paul Robeson, Sergei Eisenstein, Ossi Oswalda, Clara Bow, Priscilla Dean, Lon Chaney, Douglas Fairbanks, Harold Lloyd, Bessie Love, Lloyd Hughes, Wallace Beery, and The Lost World dinosaurs. Amazing Tales of the Archives Fans of the earliest sound films would enjoy the first presentation at this year's Amazing Tales Of The Archives. George Willeman examined the Thomas Edison Kinetophone process with a wealth of enjoyable film clips. Between 1913-1914, sound-on-cylinder invaded the nascent film industry with a collection of “talkies”. The sound was scratchy and muffled, but recognizable. It was notable that this effort focused on dialog rather than music or sound effects. As with making other recordings at the time, the technology was acoustic. The actors needed to stand perfectly still and shout into horns suspended overhead to make their voices record on a wax cylinder, which played back when the film was shown. As expected, the device was plagued by many synchronization errors. I can only imagine the effect this distorted sound had on the audience. Next up was a look at The Desmet Collection from 1907-1916 from The Netherlands. Film collector, Jean Desmet (1875-1956), managed to save not only film but a wealth of posters, programs and other documents. I think this supports my theory that hoarding and saving are not always pathological. The last presentation I found the most inspiring. A female documentarian. In the 1920's, Aloha Wanderwell Baker (1906-1996) practically circled the globe documenting people and places from Turkey to Africa to China. Photos from the era showed her roughing it on airplanes, boats, and caravans, much to the amusement of the locals. Her enthusiasm for film and social anthropology made itself evident by the fact that she was still reminiscing about her travelogs when she was in her 80's. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Early Buzz Says War For The Planet Of The Apes Is Summer’s Best Movie

Dubbed the “final chapter” in Fox’s prequel trilogy – for now, at least – there’s a profound sense of magnitude and importance resting on the furry shoulders of War For the Planet of the Apes.

Both Dawn and Rise drew praise for the ways in which they balanced spectacle with a sophisticated, fiercely compelling narrative – the franchise’s box office total is a testimony to that feat, too, which currently stands at $1.1 billion – but with War For the Planet, Matt Reeves and Fox’s threequel looks set to tip the scales ever so slightly in favor of a full-blown conflict.

That’s not to say that both parties have engineered a big, loud, and dumb blockbuster, far from it; merely that War For the Planet of the Apes has raised the stakes so high that it’s small wonder why it’s been called the darkest entry in Fox’s saga yet.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Critic's Notebook: 'The Untouchables' 30 Years Later

Critic's Notebook: 'The Untouchables' 30 Years Later
When I first saw The Untouchables as a teenager, I had never heard of Sergei Eisenstein or the Odessa Steps sequence that Brian De Palma masterfully cannibalized for the film's Union Station set-piece shootout. I knew serious actors sometimes transformed their bodies for a part, but never realized — until reading that Robert De Niro wore silk boxers to help identify with Al Capone — the lengths some went with preparations the audience would never see. And I'd never heard of its screenwriter, David Mamet, whose voice I'd soon encounter in both the plays others turned into movies (Glengarry Glen...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Overlook: From Fascist Italy came a violent medieval fantasy epic way ahead of its time

In The Overlook, A.V. Club film critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky examines the misfits, underappreciated gems, and underseen classics of film history.

No movie made in the 1940s is quite like The Iron Crown, Alessandro Blasetti’s sumptuous fantasy epic of one-eyed barbarians, glittering suits of spiky armor, and pseudo-medieval exotica. It’s sort of a blockbuster avant la lettre, very violent and lovably cheesy, closer in aesthetics and spirit to the likes of Krull and Conan The Barbarian than to the costume and fairy-tale movies of its era. In the context of film history, one might call it the midpoint between the spectacular epics of the golden age of Italian silent film and the wondrously corny Italian sword-and-sandal cheapies of the early 1960s—or perhaps an attempt by Blasetti, a student of Soviet film, to outdo Sergei Eisenstein’s classic Alexander Nevsky. But it’s much stranger than that. The
See full article at The AV Club »

Sheffield Doc/Fest to Open With World Premiere of ‘Queerama’

Sheffield Doc/Fest to Open With World Premiere of ‘Queerama’
The 24th Sheffield Doc/Fest will open with the world premiere of Daisy Asquith’s “Queerama,” in keeping with the festival’s themes this year of resistance and change.

“This year at Doc/Fest we have our most urgent and loudest call to action to join the groundswell movements of resistance and change, where we celebrate those who disobey and resist to shape the future global narrative,” said Liz McIntyre, the festival’s CEO and director. “We’re stepping into the early scenes of a tragicomic new world story.”

Britain’s leading documentary festival, Sheffield Doc/Fest runs from June 9-14. Its official program launch will be on May 3,

Marking the 50th anniversary of Britain’s landmark Sexual Offenses Act, which decriminalized private homosexual acts in England and Wales, “Queerama” will be followed by a live performance by U.S. singer-songwriter John Grant, whose music features in the film. The documentary,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trump-Era Documentaries: How a New Age of Political Anxieties Is Echoing Around the World

Trump-Era Documentaries: How a New Age of Political Anxieties Is Echoing Around the World
Sergei Eisenstein. Leni Riefenstahl. Michael Moore. Steve Bannon? At an event entitled “Alternative Facts: The Steve Bannon Reality Show” on the opening weekend of the Copenhagen International Documentary Festival (Cph:dox), writer and host Lars Trier Mogensen argued that Trump’s chief strategist might just be the most influential filmmaker among these titans of polemical documentary. A year ago, that claim might have seemed far-fetched.

Back then, the young crowd now packed into the “Social Cinema,” a performance hall in festival’s new center Kunsthal Charlottenborg, had likely never heard of this alt-right auteur. Lounging on stylish sofas, they were willing to sit through nine tedious Bannon trailers and a two-hour analysis of populism and propaganda with a Princeton professor, political scientist Jan-Werner Müller, and artist Christian von Borries. Given Bannon’s disdain for factual integrity, it would be hard to claim that his 90-minute political screeds could even be called documentaries.
See full article at Indiewire »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

Rushes. Cannes Poster, The Video Essay, James Gray vs. Harvey Weinstein, Scorsese Podcast

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Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWS© Bronx (Paris). Photo: Claudia Cardinale © Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty ImagesThe Cannes Film Festival has released the vibrant poster for their 70th edition. Beautiful, definitely, but how much longer are they going to rely on their glorious past rather than pointing to the present and future?We are excited to announce a collaboration with the Filmadrid festival in Spain to bring you films from their new section, The Video Essay, this June. Submissions are now open, so for video essayists new and experienced we encourage you to send in your work for consideration. Those selected will be screened both at the festival in Madrid and on the Notebook.Recommended VIEWINGWe adored Terence Davies' by turns witty and austere Emily Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion when it premiered last year at the Berlinale. With its U.S. release coming soon, we finally have a local trailer.
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Berlinale ’17 Very Special: Joe Ramirez. ‘The Gold Projections’

Berlinale ’17 Very Special: Joe Ramirez. ‘The Gold Projections’
On the occasion of the 67th Berlin Film Festival, from February 7 to 19, 2017 and as a prologue to the major exhibition Alchemy. The Great Art (6 April — 23 July 2017), the American artist Joe Ramirez presents the world premiere of his project “The Gold Projections” at the Staatliche Museum, Kulturforum, Exhibit Hall (just across from Potsdamer Platz on Postdamer Strasse).Joe Ramirez “Somnium” Video still, 2016 © Joe Ramirez

Joe Ramirez, who was born in San Francisco in 1958, has lived and worked in Berlin since 2007. He studied painting and film at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London, before working as a fresco painter. During the restoration of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican, Ramirez had the unique opportunity of viewing Michelangelo’s ceiling paintings up close. The journey in the hoist became an initialising experience: the scenes from The Last Judgement rolled past
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Weekly Rushes. Anderson & Anderson, Ford's Memoirs, Barbara Loden

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NEWSConcept art from the next project of Paul W.S. Anderson–an adaptation of the beloved Capcom video game Monster Hunter. Anderson discusses the project, and his upcoming Resident Evil: The Final Chapter, alongside producer Jeremy Bolt at Deadline.Toronto International Film Festival has acquired 1,460 prints, including work from Peter Mettler, Alfred Hitchcock, Michelangelo Antonioni, and Abbas Kiarostami. Recommended VIEWINGThe first trailer for Martin Scorsese's Silence.Cristi Puiu puts his unique spin on the festival award acceptance speech in response to recent accolades from the Chicago International Film Festival & Thessaloniki International Film Festival (via Ray Pride).With the recent 15 year anniversary of Richard Kelly's Donnie Darko, the BFI has cut a fantastic new trailer for the films imminent re-release.Recommended READINGAt Keyframe, David Hudson compiles numerous considerations on the role of art in light of the U.S. election results."As the train gathered speed, I began considering what
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