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Burt Reynolds dead at 82: Our appreciation of a guy’s guy and ladies’ man always having a good time

  • Gold Derby
Burt Reynolds dead at 82: Our appreciation of a guy’s guy and ladies’ man always having a good time
Burt Reynolds was a guy’s guy, a ladies’ man, the ruggedly handsome alpha male of the entertainment world, who always seemed to be having a good time – whether cracking jokes on TV talk shows with pals like Dom DeLuise or saucily posing nude as a centerfold in “Cosmopolitan” magazine — except maybe when he broke his leg during that ill-fated canoe outing in 1972’s “Deliverance,” his breakout film role. According to his reps on Thursday, the actor is dead at age 82 in his adopted home of Jupiter, Florida.

With a thicket of hair, a dapper mustache and a twinkle in his eye, he often came across as a good ol’ Southern boy in such films as “Smokey and the Bandit,” “W,W. and the Dixie Dancekings” and “The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas,” while claiming to be from Georgia. But he was born in Lansing, Michigan, although he would eventually end up in Riviera Beach,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Billy Dee Williams, Steve Harvey Among Stars Paying Tribute to Burt Reynolds

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Billy Dee Williams, Steve Harvey Among Stars Paying Tribute to Burt Reynolds
Hollywood stars were heartbroken over the news of Burt Reynolds' death on Thursday and took to social media to pay tribute to the late actor. Reynolds, who is most recognized for his roles in Boogie Nights and Deliverance, died at Jupiter Medical Center in Florida, his manager, Erik Kritzer, told The Hollywood Reporter. The actor was 82. 

The accomplished actor was notorious for starring in a variety of action films and romantic comedies, including Starting Over (1979) opposite Jill Clayburgh and Candice Bergen; The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982) with Dolly PartonBest Friends (1982) with Goldie Hawn; and ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

BAMcinématek to Spotlight Women Filmmakers & Black Cinema in Upcoming Film Series

Rungano Nyoni’s “I Am Not a Witch” will open the New Voices in Black Cinema program: Film Movement

Brooklyn theater BAMcinématek is celebrating women directors and black cinema in two of its upcoming film series. The venue will host “New Voices in Black Cinema” April 26–29 as well as “A Different Picture: Women Filmmakers in the New Hollywood Era, 1967–1980” May 2–20, it has announced.

“New Voices in Black Cinema” “provides a showcase of new and established voices in black independent cinema reflecting the wide spectrum of stories by and about African diasporic communities in the United States and beyond,” a press release details. The program’s opening film is Rungano Nyoni’s debut feature, “I Am Not a Witch.” The BAFTA winner follows a young girl in modern Zambia who, after being accused of witchcraft, is exiled from her village to a witch camp.

Among the titles screening at “New Voices
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]
Believe it or not, long before a record-shattering 21 Oscar nominations, there was a time when Meryl Streep was not the queen of the movies. After finishing at Yale Drama School in the 1970s, Streep found steady work on stage and television before her breakout role in 1978’s Best Picture Oscar winner, “The Deer Hunter.” That film brought Streep her first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress (and first loss) for her performance as Linda, the fiancee of a troubled Vietnam vet (Christopher Walken in an Oscar-winning performance).

The following year she starred in three major films: as the love interest of Alan Alda in “The Seduction of Joe Tynan;” as Woody Allen’s lesbian ex-wife in “Manhattan;” and as the troubled Joanna Kramer opposite Dustin Hoffman in “Kramer vs Kramer.” It was that latter role that brought her a first-ever win at the Academy Awards. The first words exclaimed by Streep were “Holy mackerel!
See full article at Gold Derby »

Movie Poster of the Week: Sir Alan Bates in Posters

  • MUBI
Above: UK one sheet for The Shout (Jerzy Skolimowski, UK, 1978)One of the greatest but perhaps less heralded of British actors, Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003) is being deservedly feted over the next week at the Quad Cinema in New York with the retrospective series Alan Bates: The Affable Angry Young Man. The title makes sense: before he had acted on film Bates was in the original West End and Broadway productions of Look Back in Anger, but he played not the disaffected anti-hero Jimmy Porter, made famous on film by Richard Burton, but the amiable Welsh lodger Cliff. Though a performer of great virility, intelligence and passion, he often played second fiddle to his more demonstrative co-stars—whether Anthony Quinn in Zorba the Greek (1964), Lynn Redgrave in Georgy Girl (1966), Julie Christie in Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) and The Go-Between (1971), or Jill Clayburgh in An Unmarried Woman (1978). Consequently, he is
See full article at MUBI »

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 3 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After a remarkable year in film in 1979, including her Academy Awards win for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” Meryl Streep took 1980 off from the big screen, instead focusing her energies on a stage musical of “Alice in Wonderland” that premiered at New York’s Public Theater in December 1980. While the production garnered middling notices, Streep received raves.

The following year, Streep not only returned to the screen but took on her first leading role in a screen adaptation of John Fowles‘ acclaimed 1969 novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman.” Playwright Harold Pinter adapted the book for the screen and British filmmaker Karel Reisz, who worked wonders with Vanessa Redgrave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 1 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

Prior to 1978, Meryl Streep was best-known for her acclaimed New York stage work. She made five Broadway appearances between 1975 and 1977, including a turn in “A Memory of Two Mondays/27 Wagons Full of Cotton” (1976) that brought Streep her first – and to date, only – Tony Award nomination. Her sole big screen appearance was a small, albeit memorable, turn opposite Jane Fonda in “Julia” (1977).

Streep’s name recognition increased significantly in 1978. First, there was her much-heralded performance in the epic NBC miniseries “Holocaust” that resulted in an Emmy Award. It was her second-ever appearance in a feature film, however – and in a Best Picture Academy Awards winner, no
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

10 Iconic Women Who Changed Cinema

10 Iconic Women Who Changed Cinema
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection. FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here. Agnes Varda

At age 88, the indomitable and highly influential Varda shows zero sign of slowing down when it comes to churning out art told through continually experimental means (she’s also remained committed to supporting her work in person, recently popping up at both the French Institute Alliance Française for a career-spanning chat and this year’s Rendezvous With French Cinema series with a brand new exhibit; we should all be so lucky to be as vital and involved when we’re half Varda’s age). Varda’s contributions to cinema and feminism have been
See full article at Indiewire »

AFI Fest to honour Isabelle Huppert

  • ScreenDaily
AFI Fest to honour Isabelle Huppert
The French star delivered one of the performances of the year in Paul Verhoeven’s Elle.

Isabelle Huppert will be the subject of a tribute and gala screening of Elle on November 13. She plays a successful businesswoman who tracks down her rapist.

Sony Pictures Classics acquired North America and select territories prior to the world premiere in Cannes and will release in the Us on November 11.

Isabelle Huppert is a masterful actress,” said AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga. “Her fearlessness and precision shine in Elle, and we are thrilled to honour her illustrious career at the 30th edition of AFI Fest, as she exemplifies the best of world cinema.”

Huppert has earned a record 15 César Award nominations for an actress and won in 1995 for La Cérémonie.

She won the Cannes best actress prize for The Piano Teacher in 2001 and Violette in 1978 in a tie with Jill Clayburgh for An Unmarried Woman.

In 2002 she
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Jack Hofsiss, Tony Winning Director Of ‘The Elephant Man’, Has Died At 65

Update 9:15 P.M. with more information. Jack Hofsiss, an expert in human frailty who in 1979 became the youngest director to win the Tony Award for his staging of The Elephant Man and later helmed the Jill Clayburgh film I’m Dancing As Fast As I Can, died this morning at his Manhattan home. He was 65. His death was confirmed to Deadline by the New York City Medical Examiner’s Office, which gave no cause of death pending an autopsy. “I knew him as an artist and even more…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘The Wedding Party’: Brian De Palma’s Manic Origin Story

Manic, messy, and experimental, The Wedding Party serves as a 90-minute preamble, both technically and thematically, to the next decade of Brian De Palma’s young career. Co-directed with two others (Wilford Leach and Cynthia Munroe), the film was shot in 1963, only to be released in 1969, after both De Palma and Robert De Niro’s stars were on the rise. Leach was a theater professor at Sarah Lawrence, De Palma and Munroe two of his students. Fellow student Jill Clayburgh stars as Josephine, the bride-to-be, while Charles Pfluger plays Charlie, the impending groom. Jennifer Salt — who would go on to star in Murder à la Mod, Hi, Mom! and Sisters — also appears as Phoebe, friend of the bride.

Not too long after Charlie docks on the upscale island where the wedding is to take place and meets Josephine’s whole, judgmental family, his two groomsmen, Cecil (De Niro) and Alistair (William Finley,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Academy Announces 2016 Governors Awards Recipients

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night (August 30) to present Honorary Awards to actor Jackie Chan, film editor Anne V. Coates, casting director Lynn Stalmaster and documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman. The four Oscar statuettes will be presented at the Academy’s 8th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 12, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center.

“The Honorary Award was created for artists like Jackie Chan, Anne Coates, Lynn Stalmaster and Frederick Wiseman – true pioneers and legends in their crafts,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs. “The Board is proud to honor their extraordinary achievements, and we look forward to celebrating with them at the Governors Awards in November.”

After making his motion picture debut at the age of eight, Chan brought his childhood training with the Peking Opera to a distinctive international career. He starred in – and sometimes wrote,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Academy Picks Governors Awards 2016, Including Jackie Chan and Frederick Wiseman

Academy Picks Governors Awards 2016, Including Jackie Chan and Frederick Wiseman
Every year, industry folks lobby the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with their candidates for honorary Oscar winners at the annual Governors Awards. And sometimes they get their way. Over the years Mike Kaplan, a publicists branch Academy member, has successfully lobbied for Lillian Gish, Robert Altman and John Ford’s favorite actress Maureen O’Hara, who happily collected her gold man the year before she died.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Board of Governors voted Tuesday night on the 2016 (un-televised) Governors Awards, which often including the coveted producer’s award, the Thalberg, and the Hersholt humanitarian award. You know what they’re looking for: someone who is still respected — if not revered. Francis Ford Coppola, John Calley and Dino DeLaurentiis have collected the Thalberg in recent years; Harry Belafonte, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Oprah Winfrey and Angelina Jolie have accepted the Hersholt.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Academy Picks Governors Awards 2016, Including Jackie Chan and Frederick Wiseman

  • Indiewire
Academy Picks Governors Awards 2016, Including Jackie Chan and Frederick Wiseman
Every year, industry folks lobby the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with their candidates for honorary Oscar winners at the annual Governors Awards. And sometimes they get their way. Over the years Mike Kaplan, a publicists branch Academy member, has successfully lobbied for Lillian Gish, Robert Altman and John Ford’s favorite actress Maureen O’Hara, who happily collected her gold man the year before she died.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Board of Governors voted Tuesday night on the 2016 (un-televised) Governors Awards, which often including the coveted producer’s award, the Thalberg, and the Hersholt humanitarian award. You know what they’re looking for: someone who is still respected — if not revered. Francis Ford Coppola, John Calley and Dino DeLaurentiis have collected the Thalberg in recent years; Harry Belafonte, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Oprah Winfrey and Angelina Jolie have accepted the Hersholt.
See full article at Indiewire »

Bertloucci's "La Luna" (1979) Back In The Spotlight With New York Screening

  • CinemaRetro
A rare 35mm revival screening of Bernardo Bertolucci's 1979 controversial drama La Luna, organized and hosted by Cinema Retro columnist David Savage and co-sponsored by Iconic Linx, brought near-sellout crowds to Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan last Monday night, April 25th, including the family of the late Jill Clayburgh (1944-2010) star of the film.

Organized both as a belated tribute to Clayburgh and an attempt, as described by Savage, to bring the neglected film back into popular and critical consciousness, the screening was a family affair for the beloved Clayburgh-Rabe family, bringing together Jill's husband, famed playwright David Rabe, their actress daughter Lily Rabe (star of the forthcoming "Miss Stevens") and their actor son Michael Rabe. Matthew Barry, Jill Clayburgh's co-star and son in the film, now 53 and a casting director, flew in from Los Angeles to attend the screening and panel discussion that followed, moderated by Savage. 

They were joined by David Rabe,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?
Last year HitFix threw down a 21-question quiz for Oscar fanatics, and this year we're at it again. Join us for an ultimate Oscar test featuring three tiers of difficulty: hard, harder, and hardest. Get out a notepad! The answers are on the next page. (Please note that the term "actor" can mean a man or a woman, and that any listed year refers to the time of the movie's release, not the year of the ceremony.) Hard 1. What's the highest-grossing of this year's eight Best Picture nominees? 2. Jennifer Jason Leigh just received her first Oscar nomination for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Only two performances in Quentin Tarantino's filmography have earned Academy Awards. Who performed those roles? 3. Which of this year's Best Picture nominees stars a character named Joy? 4. Who's the only person in history to win both an acting Oscar and a songwriting Oscar? 5. Name one
See full article at Hitfix »

Time Machine: Woman in Red Hathaway on Red Carpet - Updated Film List

Anne Hathaway: Oscar Host's Red Dress outshone Oscars' Red Carpet. Anne Hathaway Oscar host: Red dress one of countless outfits Blast from the Past: Pictured above is Oscar host Anne Hathaway sporting a blindingly bright white smile while on the 2011 Academy Awards' Red Carpet just outside the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. But wait. In the photo, Hathaway is wearing a blindingly bright red gown. Wasn't her dress of a metallic blue hue? Actually, no. It was beige (with patterns). Wait. Come to think of it, she actually wore a tux, not a dress. Or maybe it was all of the above. And more. How could that be? Well, the color, texture, format, and type of Anne Hathaway's outfits varied according to which 15 minutes of the Oscar telecast you watched on Sunday night, Feb. 27. Hathaway, a Best Actress nominee for Jonathan Demme's Rachel Getting Married in early
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

25 Things You May Not Know About Home Alone, 25 Years Later

  • PEOPLE.com
25 Things You May Not Know About Home Alone, 25 Years Later
Twenty-five years ago, Macaulay Culkin taught the world that a home invasion can result in physical comedy magic and family fun for all. Yes, Home Alone first opened in theaters on Nov. 16, 1990. Of course, Home Alone taught us other lessons too. For example, you can accidentally abandon your child without getting in trouble with Child Protective Services. We learned that a scary old man next door just might be a lonely guy who's handy with a snow shovel. And perhaps most important of all, Home Alone proved you can make a successful movie starring one child actor onscreen alone for
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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