John Cazale - News Poster

News

Ready Player One Review

Steven Spielberg returns to the silver screen just two months after his Oscar nominated drama The Post to present an adaption of Ernest Cline’s popular novel Ready Player One. It’s a tale gloriously steeped in nostalgia, and marks an ambitious undertaking for the venerable filmmaker, but it simply couldn’t have been left in more reliable hands. This is his domain, and unsurprisingly, what transpires is a magical cinematic experience.

Set in the year 2045, our story begins in Columbus, Ohio, where the world is now gripped with virtual reality, and in particular, a game entitled Oasis, started by the eccentric visionary James Halliday (Mark Rylance), which allows players to put on a pair of glasses and have them transported to a whole other world, where they navigate their way around as their avatar, making friends and enemies in this fictional landscape. For Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan) it’s
See full article at HeyUGuys »

In Praise of Frances McDormand

Tom Jolliffe celebrates the career of Frances McDormand

I have a number of favourite actors. If I had carte-blanche to cast a film it would probably be filled up with characters. Maybe brilliant underachievers, who never quite hit their heights for one reason or another (Mickey Rourke, Eric Roberts, Rutger Hauer), or maybe they just died before their time like John Cazale. It’s those chameleons that I find most engaging though, those who are occasionally a lead, but often find themselves as second billing (if that). People like John Goodman.

I’m staunchly proud of a lot of our finer British talents too, like Helen Mirren, a national treasure. So yes, we’re establishing here a pattern and whilst I can always sit and watch Meryl Streep or Tom Hanks, or the ‘leads’ doing their thing, I’ve always liked the character artists. One of those legends who, no
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Tragic Event in Meryl Streep's Life That Led to Her Happily Ever After With Don Gummer

  • Popsugar
The Tragic Event in Meryl Streep's Life That Led to Her Happily Ever After With Don Gummer
Meryl Streep and Don Gummer have one of the most inspiring marriages in Hollywood, and the story of how they met is no different. Their meeting in 1978 was actually a result of a tragic event in Meryl's life - her partner, Godfather actor John Cazale, had just died of bone cancer. Don, who is a sculptor, was a friend of Meryl's brother, Harry, and arrived in NYC with him to help her move out of the loft she shared with John. Although sparks didn't initially fly between them, Don invited her to move into his vacant apartment while he traveled and they corresponded through letters. Related37 Celebrity Couples Who Have Stood the Test of Time Meryl stayed in the apartment with Don even after he returned and began filming for Kramer vs. Kramer, the very role that led to her first Oscar. A romance blossomed between them, and they tied
See full article at Popsugar »

5 Things to Know About Don Gummer, the Man Who Stole Meryl Streep's Heart

  • Popsugar
5 Things to Know About Don Gummer, the Man Who Stole Meryl Streep's Heart
Meryl Streep has been married to her husband, Don Gummer, for 39 years now. Even though Don is often by her side at red carpet events and she frequently thanks him in her acceptance speeches, not much is known about Meryl's other half - up until now, anyway. Here are a few things to know about the man who stole Meryl's heart. He is a talented sculptor. Don attended Boston's School of Museum of Fine Arts, as well as Yale, where he received his bachelor's and master's in fine arts. He has a beautiful family with Meryl. The couple has four children together: daughters Louisa, Grace, and Mamie, and son Henry. Grace and Mamie are both actresses, Louisa is a model, and Henry is a musician. He's a tad bit older than Meryl. Don was born on Dec. 12, 1946, which makes him 70, and Meryl was born on June 22, 1949, making her 68. He met Meryl through her brother,
See full article at Popsugar »

Turning 40: 3 Great Movies Released in 1978

We live in an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes. Hollywood seems to have lost the taste for original stories, preferring to reach back to the successful movies of the past, hoping to be able to play it safe and pocket a hefty profit in the process. Sometimes, it works – the remake of Stephen King’s “It” has proven this – and other times, it doesn’t – just think of the dismal reviews (and pretty lousy revenues) of this year’s “The Mummy”, which might have been a profitable movie per se, with its $400 million-plus debut against a $375 million budget, buy a disappointing debut for Universal’s “Dark Universe”.

Next year, many of the most famous and well-known movie franchises of our times will celebrate their thirtieth anniversaries. Some of these will be marked by remakes hitting the screens, either in the cinemas or through other mediums, such as video games,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Dustin Hoffman Allegedly Groped Meryl Streep During an Audition in the ’70s

  • Indiewire
Dustin Hoffman Allegedly Groped Meryl Streep During an Audition in the ’70s
In the past week, two women have publicly accused Dustin Hoffman of sexual harassment, allegations which have renewed interest in Meryl Streep’s nearly-four-decade-old claim that her “Kramer vs. Kramer” co-star introduced himself by grabbing her breast. Slate tracked down a Time article from 1979 — the year the film came out — in which Streep recalls auditioning for a play Hoffman was directing. “He came up to me and said, ‘I’m Dustin — burp — Hoffman,’ and he put his hand on my breast,” the actress told Time. “What an obnoxious pig, I thought.”

Read More: Dustin Hoffman Accused of Sexual Harassment by TV Producer Wendy Riss Gatsiounis

Per Jeff Lenburg’s 2001 book “Dustin Hoffman: Hollywood’s Antihero,” the play was “All Over Town,” which debuted on Broadway in late 1974, when Streep was 25. Later that decade, the actors notoriously battled on Robert Benson’s “Kramer vs. Kramer” set, where they played divorcing parents.
See full article at Indiewire »

Gotham Season 4 Episode 6 Review – ‘Hog Day Afternoon’

Martin Carr reviews the sixth episode of Gotham season 4…

Apart from being a play on words which recalls the classic film with Al Pacino and John Cazale, ‘Hog Day Afternoon’ bears little resemblance to that heist movie. Focus is very much on dirty cops, femme fatales, murdered authority figures and one man in a hog head. There is the ongoing subplot of Solomon Grundy and Ed Nygma alongside a re-emerged Lee Thompkins, but the real story lays with our opera loving murder.

Double dealings and under the table negotiations go hand in hand as Penguin and Sofia Falcone continue their one-sided courtship dance, while Barbara, Bruce and Alfred are conspicuously absent. Once again this is a dirty, dark, seedy street level drama, all drifting manhole steam, soft focus killings and theatrical overtones. Whoever this new adversary is he has become an intriguing prospect early on, who seems unconcerned with spilling copious amounts of claret.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Noah Baumbach on ‘The Meyerowitz Stories,’ the Nature of Success, and Why so Many ‘Failed’ Artists Turn Into Assholes

Noah Baumbach on ‘The Meyerowitz Stories,’ the Nature of Success, and Why so Many ‘Failed’ Artists Turn Into Assholes
A poison-tipped portrait of living through his parents’ divorce, “The Squid and the Whale” has long been understood to be Noah Baumbach’s most explicitly autobiographical film. And yet, so much of his subsequent work — from the slapstick solipsism of “Mistress America” to the generational broadside of “While We’re Young” — is snagged on the perils of letting other people determine one’s self-worth. A Barnard freshman is desperate for the approval of her school’s most exclusive literary society. An esoteric director feels attacked when his new documentary about a leftist intellectual isn’t as warmly received as his doting protege’s dumb movie about some guy he knows on Facebook. Even “De Palma” hinges on an artist having the opportunity to reckon with his own reputation; it’s an extremely generous gift from one filmmaker to another.

So while “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected),” which premiered to
See full article at Indiewire »

On This Day: Basquiat, Last Temptation, Cleopatra

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz

30 BC Cleopatra commits suicide, allegedly by purposeful snake bite. I don't remember that scene in Liz Taylor's Cleopatra but it might have been at the four hour mark and t'was possibly asleep

How to honor this day: play with someone's snake. In the absence of a suitable one, wink at someone as saucily as Liz

← 1915 "Of Human Bondage" by W Somerset Maugham published. 19 years later it becomes a movie and marks Bette Davis's ascent to superstar actress

How to honor this day: Let it all out like Bette in that performance that's pure
See full article at FilmExperience »

Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro and Christopher Walken Have a Deer Hunter Reunion at the Chaplin Award Gala

Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro and Christopher Walken Have a Deer Hunter Reunion at the Chaplin Award Gala
Nearly four decades ago, three of today’s biggest names in film starred together in the Oscar-winning Vietnam War movie Deep Hunter — and Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro and Christopher Walken were together again on the red carpet for the Chaplin Award Gala in New York City.

On Monday, De Niro, 73, was honored with the Chaplin Award by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a lifetime achievement of excellence award. The actor’s former costars were on hand to celebrate him, posing together for photos on the red carpet.

The Deer Hunter — which starred Walken, De Niro and the late
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Meryl Streep's Marriage Has Lasted as Long as Her Career

  • Popsugar
Meryl Streep's Marriage Has Lasted as Long as Her Career
Meryl Streep knows a thing or two about long-term success, and her marriage is no exception. She and sculptor Don Gummer have been married since 1978, and he's been by her side at a number of industry events and award shows in the years since. Meryl may have been mentioned more than God in Oscars acceptance speeches over the last decade, but at the 2012 Academy Awards, it was her husband who received a sweet shout-out. When Meryl won best actress for The Iron Lady, she said, "First I'm going to thank Don because when you thank your husband at the end of the speech they play him out with the music, and I want him to know that everything I value most in our lives you've given me." The pair first met after her partner John Cazale - of The Godfather and The Deer Hunter - died of bone cancer. She
See full article at Popsugar »

Exclusive Interview: Alex Chang talks Pao and Pete & Whitely: The Take Away

In an exclusive interview, Flickering Myth sat down with actor Alex Chang to talk his role in Pao and the hit TV comedy Pete & Whitely: The Take Away

How have your family reacted to your career choice and your successes in the entertainment industry? Was it always your dream to be an actor?

I think the first thing my parents thought was, why – which is an understandable response when first embarking on this particular career path. It can be unsteady work and didn’t exactly breed confidence from my family. Saying that though, as I’ve been working as an actor consistently and in a lot of ways proved to them, and myself, that I can indeed forge a career out of acting, they are my biggest supporters and fans which is lovely.

I was always a lover of music and used that as an outlet for a lot of
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Godfather’ Reunion: Robert Duvall Imitates Marlon Brando’s Laugh and Other Highlights From Closing Night at Tribeca

‘The Godfather’ Reunion: Robert Duvall Imitates Marlon Brando’s Laugh and Other Highlights From Closing Night at Tribeca
The Tribeca Film Festival just closed with a bang. Francis Ford Coppola, Al Pacino and Robert De Niro headlined a discussion following back-to-back screenings of “The Godfather” and “The Godfather Part II” marking the 45th anniversary of the first film. It wasn’t just that formidable trio onstage: James Caan, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton and Talia Shire were all in attendance as well.

So, too, was Don Corleone himself. A photo of Marlon Brando in character overlooked the proceedings, reminding everyone at Radio City Music Hall (and the 10,500 people watching on Facebook Live) that he’ll always be the head of the family.

Taylor Hackford, who moderated the discussion, began by mentioning the film’s humble beginnings: “The Godfather” was never intended as a high-profile prestige picture. Paramount envisioned it as a “quickie” meant to capitalize on Mario Puzo’s novel’s best-seller status. Coppola elaborated, recalling that he first
See full article at Indiewire »

Brett Ratner, The Visionary Director Of ‘Rush Hour,’ ‘Tower Heist’ & ‘Hercules,’ Complains About Rotten Tomatoes

Brett Ratner is the director of three “Rush Hour” movies, one of the worst “X-Men” entries, the comedic ensemble flop “Tower Heist” and blockbuster franchise flop “Hercules.” However, you might be surprised that as a producer, he’s wielded his wallet behind Alejandro G. Iñárritu‘s “The Revenant,” Warren Beatty‘s “Rules Don’t Apply,” that big Woody Allen documentary on PBS, that great John Cazale doc “I Knew It Was You,” and other projects that highlight his often-not-talked-about cinephile and business side.

Continue reading Brett Ratner, The Visionary Director Of ‘Rush Hour,’ ‘Tower Heist’ & ‘Hercules,’ Complains About Rotten Tomatoes at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie
Celebrated author Robert James Waller has died at the age of 77. Take a look back at People’s 1995 cover story on Meryl Streep and her emotional role in the film adaptation of Waller’s The Bridges of Madison County.

In the final days of the five-week shoot of The Bridges of Madison County last fall, Meryl Streep did one of the many things she does better onscreen than anyone else: she cried. Filming an emotional scene in which her character struggles to say goodbye to her lover, the actress would show up on the set in Winterset, Iowa, at 9 in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Francis And The Godfather In Development At HBO Films

The Godfather was the ninth feature film to be directed by Academy Award winner Francis Ford Coppola – but it was arguably the first feature film to cement him in the firmament of Hollywood as a filmmaking icon. The 1972 crime drama – with a running time just shy of three hours – went on to spawn a film trilogy that entered into popular culture, and continues to wield hefty influence today, a full 45 years after it was first released. That alone is reason enough to be very excited that HBO Films is developing Francis And The Godfather, which will seek to tell the story behind the making of that epic movie.

Based on the book by Mario Puzo, The Godfather featured a script by Puzo and Coppola, and chronicled events befalling the Corleone family, as the elderly patriarch hands control of his organised crime empire to his son. With Marlon Brando in the role of Don Vito Corleone,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The 12 Best Movie Sequels Ever

  • Cinelinx
Movie sequels are big business for Hollywood. Many fans are getting burnt-out on sequels, especially since so many of them are unnecessary. Still, let’s not forget that when they’re done right, sequels can be great. Here are a dozen of the greatest sequels ever made.

12. Star Trek 2: The Wrath Of Khan (1982): Still the best of all the Star Trek films, this excellent sequel corrected everything that went wrong with its disappointing predecessor, Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The action, the humor and the character interactions were all excellent. The comparisons to Moby Dick gave it a literary flavor, and Ricardo Montalban was fantastic as the villain, Khan Noonien Singh. The death of Spock was a surprise to long-time fans, even if it didn’t last. This film made the Trek film franchise fun and set the standard for the future films.

11. The Color Of Money
See full article at Cinelinx »

30 Nominations (and Counting!): A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting Golden Globes Run

30 Nominations (and Counting!): A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting Golden Globes Run
The 74th Golden Globe Awards are just around the corner, and Hollywood’s favorite golden girl is nominated once again!

Legendary actress Meryl Streep has scored a record-breaking 30th nod — more than any other actor in the history of the Globes. Since 1979, the actress has consistently racked up nods for her acting throughout her lengthy career. In fact, Streep has only been kept off the ballot just 12 years out of the 37 since her first nod — doubling up on nominations in 2003, 2009 and 2010.

Take a look back on her long history with the Globes, and a beginning steeped in tragedy.

Triumph Amid
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ring in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies ever

  • Cineplex
Ring in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies everRing in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies everBrianne Hogan12/31/2016 12:15:00 Pm

Such as Irl, New Year’s Eve in movies tend to punctuate big moments. Long-awaited kisses, horrific endings, beautiful beginnings abound as everyone downs flutes of champagne while attempting to sing the words to “Auld Lang Syne” (even if no one understands exactly what they’re singing).

As we say goodbye to 2015 and ring in 2016, we look at some of cinema’s most memorable New Year’s moments from years past, including everything from the scary to the silly to the swoony.

Check out our picks: Ghostbusters II

If you think your New Year’s Eve sucks, remember it could be worse. Like, evil painting-dwelling-ghost-Vigo-worse. Vigo is attempting to return to the mortal world and wrecks a whole lot of havoc
See full article at Cineplex »

Suicide Squad makes Con Air look inspired. It's time for a blockbuster face-lift

Our writer-at-large saw DC’s critically panned film and thinks it’s emblematic of Hollywood’s superhero inertia. His solution: let Yorgos Lanthimos have a go

Warner Bros’ marketing department is probably having a hell of a time finding positive quotes for their latest DC Comics-inspired critical disaster, Suicide Squad. I feel for the poor intern who has to go through all the press clippings and sort through bon mots such as “Resembles the sale rack at a Burlington Coat Factory” and “Jared Leto’s overacting makes the dog from Beethoven look like John Cazale” just to find the stray compliment that the studio will shoe-horn into a 30-second spot during Bachelor in Paradise. In honor of those poor souls who just want to get some experience in Hollywood during their summer away from Northwestern, here’s a quote for you, free of charge: I didn’t hate it!
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites