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‘Perfect Strangers’ Director Paolo Genovese Set for U.S. Debut (Exclusive)

‘Perfect Strangers’ Director Paolo Genovese Set for U.S. Debut (Exclusive)
Italian director Paolo Genovese, whose concept movie “Perfect Strangers” involving smartphones and personal secrets is making a global splash, is set to make his English-language debut with “The First Day of My Life,” a New York-set suicide dramedy with echoes of Frank Capra’s classic “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

Based on Genovese’s novel of the same title, which has become a bestseller in Italy, “The First Day of My Life” revolves around four characters on the brink of taking their lives who make a pact with a stranger with supernatural powers. The mystery man gives them a chance to travel forward in time to see for a week how their friends and relatives would react to their deaths and what the world would be like without them. On the last day of the week, the four potential suicides have the option of deciding whether whether to live or jump off the Manhattan Bridge.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Little Pink House – Review

Catherine Keener stars as Susette Kelo, in the true-story drama about her battle against eminent domain to keep her home, in Little Pink House. Photo courtesy of Korchula Productions

A pink house is not for everyone but it was just right for Susette Kelo, especially with a lovely river view. When a local economic redevelopment organization tries to seize the Connecticut cottage she so lovingly rehabbed for a project to lure a Big Pharma company to the financially-strapped town, she fights – all the way to the Supreme Court.

There is a bit of Frank Capra mixed with “Erin Brockovich” in the true story-inspired Little Pink House. Oscar-nominee Catherine Keener plays Kelo in a moving performance as an ordinary woman pushed too far in this film from Courtney Balaker, making her directorial debut.

After her marriage failed, paramedic Kelo was looking for a place to start over. When she finds the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Along Came Jones

Big star Gary Cooper kids his screen image as an infallible hero in a western that almost plays as a screwball comedy, complete with the ultimate grouchy sidekick, William Demarest. Loretta Young’s attraction to Coop’s goofy ‘bronc stomper’ seem glowingly authentic. The jokes are funny, and the sentiment feels real, right up to the unexpectedly violent ending. . . for 1945, that is.

Along Came Jones

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1945 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 90 min. / Street Date January 16, 2018 / 39.99

Starring: Gary Cooper, Loretta Young, William Demarest, Dan Duryea, Frank Sully, Don Costello, Walter Sande, Russell Simpson, Arthur Loft, Willard Robertson, Ray Teal, Lance Fuller, Chris-Pin Martin.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: Thomas Neff

Original Music: Arthur Lange

Written by Nunnally Johnson from the novel by Alan Le May

Produced by Gary Cooper

Directed by Stuart Heisler

At the end of WW2 came forth a burst of new independent film production companies headed by actors and directors.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Best Kids Movies on Netflix

With content providers doing everything they can to grab your attention (and the attention of your kids), it is understandable that users are overwhelmed. Lets be honest, with the volumes and volumes of content that is offered who has time to really browse a site for all the best films? Well, look no further as we believe we have you covered with the 15 best kids and family movies available on Netflix right now.

Kids movies are a dime a dozen. Yet, they are the holy grail for content creators. Provide a respite for weary parents, one that is actually going to help your children, and you will have some very satisfied customers. Break that trust and it will be something that is very hard to get back. Something that will not only stain your reputation as a provider of solid content, but also something that will make you easily forgotten
See full article at MovieWeb »

Douglas Sirk at Universal-International, Part 1: The Studio

  • MUBI
Douglas Sirk at Universal-International is a two-part overview by Blake Lucas. Part 2 can be found here. Mubi's series, In the Realm of Melodrama: A Douglas Sirk Retrospective, is showing April 2 - June 20, 2018 in the United Kingdom and many other countries.It is often felt that in an ideal world, film directors—or artists of any kind—might carve out their own bodies of work, in freedom, without any interference, beholden to nothing but a personal vision that they labor to express. In movies, it has often not worked that way, and in Hollywood in the years of the studio system especially, directors worked within conditions. One of these was the studio itself, generally conceded to have its own style, and so many other defining aspects—genre preferences, contract players and craftsmen, contract producers with power of their own. But a fair number of directors now widely considered among the
See full article at MUBI »

Martin Scorsese Unveils 38-Film Curriculum Surveying Democracy in American Cinema

Recently completing one of the longest shoots of his career with The Irishman, most other directors would consider that an accomplishment enough, but in between takes, Martin Scorsese somehow found time to construct a new curriculum as part of his “The Story of Movies” film course, produced with his company Film Foundation. This latest edition is “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” and is free for students. However, if one would just like to follow along with their own personal screenings, the full list is available.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing. For young people born into this world now, it’s absolutely crucial that they get guided,” Scorsese says (via IndieWire). “They have to learn how to sort the differences between art and pure commerce, between cinema and content, between the secrets of images that are individually crafted and the secrets of images that are mass-produced.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film from ‘Ready Player One’ director ranked from worst to best

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film from ‘Ready Player One’ director ranked from worst to best
A man-eating shark. A friendly alien. An adventurous archeologist. A ragtag WWII platoon. A heroic German businessman in the Holocaust. The eclectic career of director Steven Spielberg has virtually defined what a blockbuster could be in the past four decades, but he’s also been able to craft more personal films as well. His 31st directorial achievement, the upcoming “Ready Player One,” opens this Thursday, March 29. In recognition of this new movie, we are ranking Spielberg’s entire filmography from worst to best in a new photo gallery above of his 30 prior theatrical features (therefore, not including the TV movie “Duel”).

Based on Ernest Cline‘s bestselling book, “Ready Player One” imagines a future where the creator of a virtual reality world called Oasis challenges his users to find an Easter Egg which will give the recipient a vast fortune. It’s a return to the kind of rollicking entertainments
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More

Martin Scorsese’s New Film Course: ‘Portraits of America’ Teaches Democracy Through Chaplin, Coppola, and More
Martin Scorsese and his nonprofit organization The Film Foundation have announced their brand-new film curriculum, “Portraits of America: Democracy on Film.” The curriculum is the latest addition to the group’s ongoing film course “The Story of Movies,” which aims to teach students how to read the language of film and place motion pictures in the context of history, art, and society. Both “Democracy on Film” and the course are completely free for schools and universities.

“Portraits of America: Democracy on Film” is broken down into eight different sections, all of which include in-depth looks at some of the most important American films ever made, from Chaplin to Ford, Coppola, Spielberg, and ultimately Scorsese himself. The program is presented in partnership with Afscme. Scorsese announced the curriculum at a March 27 press conference in New York City.

“We all need to make sense of what we’re seeing,” Scorsese explained. “For
See full article at Indiewire »

Steven Spielberg movies: Every film ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Steven Spielberg movies: Every film ranked from worst to best
A man-eating shark. A friendly alien. An adventurous archeologist. A ragtag WWII platoon. A heroic German businessman in the Holocaust. The eclectic career of director Steven Spielberg has virtually defined what a blockbuster could be in the past four decades, but he’s also been able to craft more personal films as well. His 31st directorial achievement, the upcoming “Ready Player One,” opens this Thursday, March 29. In recognition of this new movie, we are ranking Spielberg’s entire filmography from worst to best in a new photo gallery above of his 30 prior theatrical features (therefore, not including the TV movie “Duel”).

Based on Ernest Cline‘s bestselling book, “Ready Player One” imagines a future where the creator of a virtual reality world called Oasis challenges his users to find an Easter Egg which will give the recipient a vast fortune. It’s a return to the kind of rollicking entertainments
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: ‘Midnight Sun’

Google “xeroderma pigmentosum” and you will find no photos of pale young women who look like Bella Thorne in “Midnight Sun.” The condition, in which the body is unable to heal DNA damaged by exposure to Uv rays, has side effects that might appear freakish to the average person, including an abundance of freckles, dry skin, cancerous lesions, and spider veins, but which convey just how serious Xp is for those who suffer from it (only one in five makes it to his or her 20th birthday).

It could have simply been a marketing trick, but at advance screenings of “Midnight Sun,” they put a small box of tissues at everybody’s seat. Good thing too: The independently produced melodrama — a remake of a popular 2006 weepie from Japan, where the potentially fatal skin condition is six times more common — doesn’t jerk tears so much as coax them, like a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Where do the most recent group of Academy Award winners rank all time?

As we begin to fully focus on 2018 releases and eventually what the 2019 awards season will be like, a little more about the most recent Oscars is still required. Mainly, a look at how the winners stack up with previous ones. This time around, I’m tying in all of the major categories together. Yes, all eight of the top prizes will get a rundown today, with the possibility of another piece next week on the technical categories. For now, it’s Picture, Director, the four Acting slots, and both Screenplay categories, which is more than enough to start with. This is going to be fun. Like I mentioned above, before we get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, it’s more of a broader collection. Obviously, we know
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films
In 2009 — when the Academy Awards went to 10 Best Picture nominees for the first time since 1943 — the preferential system of voting, which had been used from 1934 to 1945, was reintroduced. The academy did so as it believed this “best allows the collective judgment of all voting members to be most accurately represented.”

We have detailed how the preferential voting system works at the Oscars in the modern era. So, let’s take a look back at those dozen years early in the history of the academy when it first used this complicated counting to determine the Best Picture winner rather than a simple popular vote. (At the bottom of this post, be sure to vote for the film that you think will take the top Oscar this year.)

See Best Picture Gallery: Every winner of the top Academy Award

1934

This seventh ceremony marked the first time that the Oscars eligibility period was the calendar year.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) or Greta Gerwig (‘Lady Bird’) would be 21st under-40 Best Director Oscar winner

Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) or Greta Gerwig (‘Lady Bird’) would be 21st under-40 Best Director Oscar winner
Jordan Peele (“Get Out”) celebrated his 39th birthday on Feb. 21 and Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) is 34 years old. Neither will beat Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”) as the youngest Best Director Oscar winner (32 years, 38 days), though Gerwig would be the fourth youngest. But if either Peele or Gerwig upsets frontrunner Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), he or she would be the 21st winner under the age of 40.

While Gerwig, who would be 34 years and 212 days old at the ceremony, would slide into the fourth youngest slot, Peele would be the 18th youngest, edging out “The Awful Truth” (1937) director Leo McCarey (39 years, 158 days), “The Lost Weekend” (1945) helmer Billy Wilder (39 years, 258 days) and “Mr. Deed Goes to Town” (1936) champ Frank Capra (39 years, 290 days). All 20 under-40 champs were in their 30s at the time of their victories.

See 2018 Oscars: Greta Gerwig (‘Lady Bird’) could fly into the record books as fourth
See full article at Gold Derby »

Anonymous Oscar Ballot: Executive Loves ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Three Billboards’ Is ‘Less Than the Sum of Its Parts’

  • Indiewire
Anonymous Oscar Ballot: Executive Loves ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Three Billboards’ Is ‘Less Than the Sum of Its Parts’
Here’s another in our series of interviews with a swath of Academy voters from different branches for their candid thoughts on what got picked, overlooked, and overvalued this year.

Best Motion Picture of the Year

I haven’t decided. “Get Out,” over time, it stood up. “Get Out” is so spectacular. But the end makes no sense. It’s such a brilliant joke that it makes you not care that it makes no sense. There’s nothing in the algebra of the movie that makes that ending possible — no clues, no hints. In the end, it’s a deus ex machina, but the joke is so good I don’t care. They had a different ending: too dark, everyone hated it. It’s so brilliant to take a movie like that–like Frank Capra chopped off the first reel of “Lost Horizon.” I’m talking myself into voting for it now.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Kings’ Theater Review: Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington and Confronts Big, Bad Lobbyists

  • The Wrap
Mrs. Smith goes to Washington in Sarah Burgess’ new play, “Kings,” which opened Tuesday at the Public Theater. Rep. Sydney Millsap (Elsa Davis, “House of Cards”) is as high-minded as James Stewart’s senator but much tougher. The joke of Frank Capra’s 1939 classic movie is that, while Stewart’s character meant well, he’s essentially incompetent, and that the government’s in better hands with the corrupt politicians, who are, at least, smart. Millsap is definitely smart and competent, and in the first few scenes of “Kings” she’s also rather unsympathetic in her blithe dismissal of the people around her. Those people, however,...
See full article at The Wrap »

‘King Of Hearts’ Trailer: Philippe de Broca’s Anti-War Comedy Returns With A New Restoration

Great films aren’t always recognized in their time. Frank Capra‘s “It’s A Wonderful Life” was a box office flop when it was first released, only to be rediscovered and reclaimed years later as a holiday classic. Philippe de Broca’s off-the-wall anti-war comedy “King Of Hearts” followed a similar path. First released in 1966 in France, and the following year in the U.S., the picture didn’t gain much traction on either side of the pond.
See full article at The Playlist »

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?
It used to be pretty much an Academy Awards norm that the film that won Best Picture also took home the Oscar for Best Director. In recent years that has changed, largely due to the preferential ballot that has been implemented for Best Picture voting. These two categories have split in four of the past five years, with “Birdman” (2014) and its director Alejandro G. Inarritu being the last time they lined up. Currently “The Shape of Water” is in first place to win both categories on Gold Derby’s Oscar charts, so might things get back on track this year?

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

A year ago Damien Chazelle won Best Director for “La La Land” while “Moonlight” took Best Picture, becoming the fourth time this decade that the Oscar split occurred. In 2015 Inarritu won Best Director for “The Revenent” (his second
See full article at Gold Derby »

Guillermo del Toro wins DGA Award

Guillermo del Toro wins DGA Award
Guillermo del Toro took a giant stride towards the Oscar on Saturday night (February 3), winning the outstanding directorial achievement in feature film accolade for The Shape Of Water at the Directors Guild Of America’s 70th annual DGA Awards.

Del Toro recently won the Golden Globe best directing award and further bolstered his Oscar prospects with the DGA, regarded as a strong bellwether of Academy Award success.

Since 1948, only seven DGA winners have not gone on to win the Oscar. Ben Affleck is the famous most recent example. He won the DGA for Argo in 2013 and did not even receive an Academy Award nod for the film.

Del Toro recently won the Golden Globe best directing award. Meanwhile Jordan Peele continued a remarkable awards season, winning best first-time feature director for Get Out. Peele is also nominated for the directing Oscar. Matthew Heineman was named best documentary feature director for [link=tt
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Who is the best Oscar-winning director of all time?

Capra? Coppola? Bigelow? Our chief film critic crowns one of five nominees the Oscar of Oscars champion – and reveals who you picked as your winner

Catch up on the full list of nominees

After announcing the nominees last week, we begin our Oscar of Oscars all-time list with best director. In no other category has this choice been more painful, because, rightly or wrongly, the director is often seen as a film’s all-powerful creator: a film director’s authorial rights are even enshrined in EU law. The director liaises with the casting director and works with the actors, rehearsing them, shaping their performances. The director consults with the cinematographer, framing shots, and decides which take to use. The director makes decisions under pressure on set and on location about the look and feel of what is being shot. And of course the director accumulates prestige and respect — part of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Magician Penn Jillette Explains How Batman is The Ultimate American Magician

Batman has always been one of my favorite superheroes. I loved that even though he didn't have any superpowers he was still an ultimate badass. But, the ultimate American magician?! I never thought of the Caped Crusader as a magician... until today. Master magician Penn Jillette has opened my eyes and has made me see that, yes... Batman is the ultimate magician!

The Washington Post recently talked to 24 professionals from various industries and asked them what films they thought most accurately portrayed what they themselves do for a living. There's a former Nasa administrator who chose Ridley Scott’s The Martian; a politician picked Frank Capra’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; and then there was an attorney who picked My Cousin Vinny. Those are pretty typical answers, but then there was Penn Jillette, who picked Batman and he gives a great explanation as to why:

"The magic I think
See full article at GeekTyrant »
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