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Dario Argento’s The Bird With The Crystal Plumage This Weekend Midnights at The Moolah

“Right! Bring in the perverts!”

The Bird With The Crystal Plumage screens Midnights this weekend (July 13th and 14th) at The Moolah Theater and Lounge as part of Destroy the Brain’s monthly Late Nite Grindhouse film series.

Having served his time in the cinematic trenches both as a film critic and a screenwriter (notably collaborating with Bernardo Bertolucci on Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in the West), Dario Argento, the man who would become known as “The Italian Hitchcock” made his directorial debut with The Bird With The Crystal Plumage, a snappy little giallo, the success of which cemented his path within the genre. Admittedly, there are only a few moments of outright horror and/or gore, but the newcomer’s sharp grasp of tension, atmosphere, camerawork, and pacing are beyond reproach in this telling of Sam, a vacationing American (Tony Musante) who on his last day
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Top Chilean Production Company Invercine & Wood Prepares Dictator Augusto Pinochet TV Drama

Top Chilean film-tv company Invercine & Wood, co-producer of Turner Latin America’s upscale TV drama “Mary & Mike,” is preparing political thriller series “Un simple soldado” (“An Ordinary Soldier”), about the rise and fall of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet.

The six-episode mini-series will be directed by “Mary & Mike” helmer Julio Jorquera, and written by Enrique Videla, scribe on Pablo Larraín’s pioneering HBO Latin American series “Prófugos.”

An intimate portrait of Pinochet – who defined himself as “an ordinary soldier” – the new series will focus on how the dictator was seduced by power and how, with political cunning, managed to transform himself into a supreme leader for almost two decades, changing the course of the history in Chile.

Taking power on Sept. 11, 1973, after a violent coup, Augusto Pinochet established alliances to cement his position, first as supreme leader and then as president of the Chilean Republic, facing opposition such as the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bernardo Bertolucci's Tone-Deaf Attack on Ridley Scott

Bernardo Bertolucci's Tone-Deaf Attack on Ridley Scott
In late 1972, the 31-year-old Bernardo Bertolucci unleashed his most controversial movie on the world. The picture was Last Tango in Paris and it caused a sensation. Critics raved about the story of a middle-aged American expatriate and his anonymous sexual encounters with a gorgeous young Frenchwoman. “[Last Tango] is one of the great emotional experiences of our time,” wrote Roger Ebert. “It’s a movie that exists so resolutely on the level of emotion, indeed, that possibly only Marlon Brando, of all living actors, could have played its lead. Who else can act so brutally and imply such vulnerability and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Ridley Scott 'should be ashamed' of treatment of Kevin Spacey, says Bertolucci

The veteran director claims Scott should not have cut Spacey from All the Money in the World – and says he now wants to work with the disgraced actor

Bernardo Bertolucci has said that Ridley Scott “should be ashamed” over the decision to cut Kevin Spacey from his drama All the Money in the World.

Scott made the last-minute decision to remove Spacey from the completed film last autumn after the actor and former Old Vic artistic director was accused of sexual harassment and assault by a number of men. Spacey’s scenes were reshot at great expense, with Christopher Plummer replacing him in the role of billionaire J Paul Getty.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci Says Ridley Scott “Should Be Ashamed” Of Cutting Kevin Spacey Out Of Film

Filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci Says Ridley Scott “Should Be Ashamed” Of Cutting Kevin Spacey Out Of Film
Bernardo Bertolucci is a filmmaker that is no stranger to controversy. Before the Weinstein allegations, and the current #MeToo movement, Bertolucci became the subject of much criticism because of an infamous scene in his film “Last Tango in Paris.” But now it seems like Bertolucci has inserted himself into the conversation yet again, with his take on the Kevin Spacey situation.
See full article at The Playlist »

Bernardo Bertolucci: Ridley Scott Should Be ‘Ashamed’ for Removing Kevin Spacey From ‘All the Money in the World’

Bernardo Bertolucci: Ridley Scott Should Be ‘Ashamed’ for Removing Kevin Spacey From ‘All the Money in the World’
Bernardo Bertolucci is known for courting controversy thanks to sexually explicit films such as “Last Tango in Paris,” and now the Italian director is making headlines for criticizing Ridley Scott for removing Kevin Spacey from his drama “All the Money in the World.” Speaking at the Bari International Film Festival (via Deadline), Bertolucci said Scott should be ashamed for his decision.

“When I learned that Ridley Scott had agreed to eliminate the scenes of ‘All the Money in the World’ in which Kevin Spacey was playing, I sent a message to editor Peter Scalia to tell Scott that he should be ashamed,” Bertolucci said. “And then I immediately wanted to make a film with Spacey.”

Bertolucci went on to clarify that he supports the #MeToo movement, and he even praised it for raising awareness about violence against women around the world.

Spacey was removed from Scott’s film and replaced
See full article at Indiewire »

Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’

  • The Wrap
Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’
Last Tango in Paris” director Bernardo Bertolucci had harsh words for Ridley Scott this weekend, telling a crowd at the Bari International Film Festival that he thinks the “All the Money in the World” filmmaker “should be ashamed” for removing Kevin Spacey from the lead role.

While Bertolucci said he respects the #MeToo movement and the awareness of abuse that it has raised, he thinks that Scott gave in to industry demands by making a deal with TriStar Pictures to reshoot Spacey’s scenes as J. Paul Getty with Christopher Plummer replacing him in the role. The sudden reshoots just weeks away from release were announced after the Spacey cut of the film was pulled from the closing night of AFI Fest in the wake of sexual assault accusations against Spacey made by several men.

Also Read: Kevin Spacey Sexual Assault Case Under Review by La District Attorney

Since those accusations were made, with the first coming from actor Anthony Rapp, investigations have been opened against Spacey by law enforcement in Los Angeles and London. A confidential hotline was opened by the Old Vic Theater, which Spacey was the artistic director of for 11 years, to allow anyone with allegations of abuse by Spacey to step forward. Meanwhile, Netflix removed Spacey from their marquee series, “House of Cards,” with Robin Wright becoming the main character for the show’s final season later this year.

But as Spacey’s career has nosedived, Bertolucci said that after seeing Spacey get erased from “All the Money in the World” he “immediately wanted to make a film” with the actor.

Also Read: Kevin Spacey Foundation in UK Shuts Down After Sexual Assault Accusations

Bertolucci came scrutiny after footage leaked two years ago of a masterclass in which the director revealed that actress Maria Schneider had not been fully informed of crucial details in a scene in “Last Tango in Paris” where Marlon Brando’s character uses a stick of butter as a lubricant to simulate sex with Schneider. Before her death in 2011, Schneider said in an interview that she “felt humiliated and, to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci.”

Bertolucci has since defended himself, saying that aside from the butter, he knew about the violent nature of the rape scene. He continued to defend himself at the Bari Festival this weekend.

“On the set she was happy,” he said. “Do not believe on social media when they say it was rape: the butter scene was pure simulation.”

Read original story Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’ At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Bernardo Bertolucci Drags Ridley Scott For Replacing Kevin Spacey In ‘All The Money In The World’

Things have been quiet on the Kevin Spacey front — until today. Legendary film director Bernardo Bertolucci recently came forward to defend the disgraced ex-House of Cards actor as he slammed Ridley Scott’s decision to replace him in All the Money in the World. According to the Italian publication il Giornale, Bertolucci was attending Teatro Petruzzelli in Bari where they were previewing a restored version of The Last Tango in Paris. While there he said: “When I learned…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Bernardo Bertolucci Says Ridley Scott "Should Be Ashamed" for Replacing Kevin Spacey

Bernardo Bertolucci Says Ridley Scott
Bernardo Bertolucci criticized fellow filmmaker Ridley Scott's decision last year to replace Kevin Spacey in All the Money in the World with Christopher Plummer after Spacey was accused of sexual assault by more than a dozen men.

During the world premiere of his restored film Last Tango in Paris on Saturday night at the Bari International Film Festival, Bertolucci had harsh words for Scott.

Bertolucci said that when he learned Scott had agreed to erase all of Spacey's scenes in the film, his first reaction was to message Scott's frequent editor Pietro Scalia, "to tell Scott that he should be ashamed,” said...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ to Open Cannes Critics’ Week Sidebar

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ to Open Cannes Critics’ Week Sidebar
“Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s adaptation of a Richard Ford novel starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal, has been chosen to screen in the International Critics’ Week sidebar at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.

Critics’ Week is run independently of the main festival but takes place concurrently. The selection is devoted to first and second films from new directors — and its directorial debuts, including “Wildlife,” are eligible for Cannes’ Camera d’Or for the festival’s best first film.

“Wildlife” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won positive reviews and was acquired by IFC Films. The only American film screening in Critics’ Week, it will be presented as a special opening-night screening in the sidebar.

Also Read: 'Wildlife' Review: Paul Dano's Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis

Guillaume Senez’s “Our Struggles” will also be presented as a special screening, while Alex Katz’s “Guy” will close the section. The seven competition titles in Critics’ Week will include Agnieszka Smoczynska’s “Fugue,” Benedikt Erlingsson’s “Woman at War,” Anja Kofmel’s “Chris the Swiss,” Rohena Gera’s “Sir” and Sofia Szilagyi’s “One Day.”

International Critics’ Week (Semaine de la Critique) is organized by the French Union of Film Critics, which is made up of 244 critics, writers and journalists. The oldest parallel section to the Cannes Film Festival, it began in 1962.

The winners will be chosen by a jury headed by Danish director Joachim Trier and also including American actress Chloe Sevigny, Argentinian actor Nahuel Perez Biscayart, festival programmer Eva Sangiori and French journalist Augustin Trapenard.

Critics’ Week also announced 10 short films in competition and another three in special screenings.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Filmmakers who first screened in Cannes as part of Critics’ Week include Bernardo Bertolucci, Ken Loach, Guillermo del Toro, Jacques Audiard and Alejandro G. Inarritu.

The other main sidebar that runs concurrently with the festival, Directors’ Fortnight, will announce its lineup on Tuesday.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 8 through May 19.

The Critics’ Week lineup:

Special screenings:

“Wildlife,” Paul Dano

“Nos Batailles” (“Our Struggles”), Guillaume Senez

“Sheherazade,” Jean-Bernard Marlin

Feature film competition:

“Fuga” (“Fugue”), Agnieszka Smoczynska

“Kona Fer I Strid” (Woman at War”), Benedikt Erlingsson

“Sauvage,” Camille Vidal-Naquet

“Diamantino,” Gabriel Abrantes & Daniel Schmidt

“Chris the Swiss,” Anja Kofmel

“Sir,” Rohena Gera

“Egy Nap” (“One Day”), Sofia Szilagyi

Closing night:

“Guy,” Alex Lutz

Short films competition:

“Amor, Avenidas Novas,” Duarte Coimbra

“Ektoras Malo: I Teleftea Mera Tis Chronias” (“Hector Malot: The Last Day of the Year”), Jacqueline Lentzou

“Pauline asservie” (“Pauline, Enslaved”), Charline Bourgeois-Tacquet

“La Persistente,” Camille Lugan

“Rapaz” (“Raptor”), Felipe Galvez

“Schacher,” Flurin Giger

“Tiikeri” (“The Tiger”), Mikko Myllylahti

“Un Jour de Marriage” (“A Wedding Day”), Elias Belkeddar

“Ya Normalniy” (“Normal”), Michael Borodin

“Mo-Bum-Shi-Min” (“Exemplary Citizen”), Kim Cheol-Hwi

Short films special screenings:

“Third Kind,” Yorgos Zois

“La Chute” (“The Fall”), Boris Labbe

“Ultra Pulpe,” Bertrand Mandico

Read original story Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ to Open Cannes Critics’ Week Sidebar At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Eva Green: "The Edit"

Take a look at actress Eva Green ("300: Rise Of An Empire") in "The Edit" magazine, photographed by Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello:

Green started her career in theater before making her film debut in director Bernardo Bertolucci's "The Dreamers" (2003).

She then achieved international recognition as 'Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem' in director Ridley Scott's "Kingdom of Heaven" (2005).

Green then played 'Bond Girl' 'Vesper Lynd' in "Casino Royale" (2006).

Since 2006, Green has starred in the independent films "Cracks" (2009), "Womb" (2010) and "Perfect Sense" (2011).

She has also appeared in the TV series "Camelot" (2011)...

...followed by the role of 'Angelique Bouchard' in director Tim Burton's "Dark Shadows" (2012).

In 2014, Green played 'Artemisia' in "300: Rise of an Empire"...

...followed by the character 'Ava Lord' in the Frank Miller/Robert Rodriguez- directed "Sin City: A Dame to Kill For".

Green also stars in Showtime's "Penny Dreadful"...

...and "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
See full article at SneakPeek »

Former Berlin Film Festival Director Thinks Condemning Harvey Weinstein Is a Major Loss For European Cinema

Moritz de Hadeln, who served as the director of the Berlin Film Festival for more than 20 years between 1980 and 2001, has come to the defense of Harvey Weinstein. In an op-ed written for Swiss newspaper “Die Weltwoch” (via Deadline), de Hadeln says the “lynching” Weinstein is experiencing is “simply disgusting.” The former festival director later praises Weinstein for being instrumental in making international cinema visible in the United States.

De Hadeln criticizes his contemporaries like Cannes director Thierry Fremaux and Venice director Alberto Barbera for condemning Weinstein in the aftermath of dozens of sexual harassment and assault allegations made against him. De Hadeln argues that Weinstein “has not even been convicted of the crimes” in the court of law and that “we should let the legal system decide if Weinstein has committed any crimes.”

“More than anyone else, [international film festival directors] should understand the important role that the Weinstein brothers, Harvey in particular, have had in supporting European cinema,
See full article at Indiewire »

Gate Cinema co-founder Barbara Stone dies aged 83

Stone worked as a producer, director, distributor and exhibitor in London and the Us.

Producer, director, distributor and exhibitor Barbara Stone, who worked in London and the Us, has died aged 83.

Stone was perhaps best known for founding the Gate Cinemas and Cinegate Film Distribution with her husband David Stone, who died in 2011.

The Gate Cinemas was one of the UK’s best-known independent cinema chains in the 1970s and 1980s. It started with the acquisition of the former Classic cinema at Notting Hill Gate in 1974, which was renamed the Gate, followed by the Gate 2 in Brunswick Square in 1978 and
See full article at ScreenDaily »

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes
The new rules raise “a simple mathematical question”.

The French Syndicate of Cinema Critics has raised objections to changes to the press screenings schedule at the Cannes film festival.

“The announcement of the new schedule is worrying to us. The work of the critics working for the daily press, internet sites, news agencies and radio and television will be impacted,” the body said in a statement.

Under the new schedule, announced on Friday, the festival has ditched morning press screenings for titles due to officially premiere in an evening gala screening.

The press will now watch 7pm premieres in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes, suggest reviews embargo

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes, suggest reviews embargo
The new rules raise “a simple mathematical question”.

The French Syndicate of Cinema Critics has raised objections to changes to the press screenings schedule at the Cannes film festival.

“The announcement of the new schedule is worrying to us. The work of the critics working for the daily press, internet sites, news agencies and radio and television will be impacted,” the body said in a statement.

Under the new schedule, announced on Friday, the festival has ditched morning press screenings for titles due to officially premiere in an evening gala screening.

The press will now watch 7pm premieres in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes, suggests reviews embargo

French critics object to Cannes press screening changes, suggests reviews embargo
The new rules raise “a simple mathematical question”.

The French Syndicate of Cinema Critics has raised objections to changes to the press screenings schedule at the Cannes film festival.

“The announcement of the new schedule is worrying to us. The work of the critics working for the daily press, internet sites, news agencies and radio and television will be impacted,” the body said in a statement.

Under the new schedule, announced on Friday, the festival has ditched morning press screenings for titles due to officially premiere in an evening gala screening.

The press will now watch 7pm premieres in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bernardo Bertolucci on Fellow Italian Nonconformist Luca Guadagnino

Bernardo Bertolucci on Fellow Italian Nonconformist Luca Guadagnino
Bernardo Bertolucci and Luca Guadagnino hail from different generations, but both Italian directors have a bent for making sensual English-language films. And each knows what it’s like to be embraced by critics and audiences abroad but snubbed at home, as Bertolucci tells Variety in a rare interview.

Perhaps that experience has helped fuel the two auteurs’ mutual admiration. Bertolucci, whose 1987 epic “The Last Emperor” scored a historic nine-Oscar sweep, including best director and picture, has long been a champion of Guadagnino’s work, while the younger director spent two years sifting through archives to make “Bertolucci on Bertolucci,” a documentary Guadagnino considers to be his most personal film. Bertolucci, 77, was the first outsider to whom Guadagnino showed a rough cut of his coming-of-age love story “Call Me by Your Name,” which several critics note is reminiscent of the older maestro’s 1996 film “Stealing Beauty.”

Guadagnino has had a fervent fan base in Los Angeles and London
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film News Roundup: Burt Young-Sally Kirkland’s ‘Sarah Q’ Wraps Production

Film News Roundup: Burt Young-Sally Kirkland’s ‘Sarah Q’ Wraps Production
In today’s film news roundup, production on “Sarah Q” wraps, Danny DeVito gets an honor, and “Path of Blood” gets distribution.

Production Wrap

John Gallagher’s indie drama “Sarah Q,” starring Academy Award nominees Burt Young and Sally Kirkland, has wrapped production.

The cast includes “The Sopranos” stars Tony Sirico, Vincent Pastore, Federico Castelluccio, William DeMeo, and Artie Pasquale. Emmy James stars in the title role, with newcomers Ashlee Macropoulos, Samantha Scaffidi, Tamara Skylar Jones and Sarah Seeds — alumni of Gallagher’s acting classes at One on One NYC.

Written by Gallagher and Joe Benedetto from a story by Gallagher, the movie is described as a serio-comic tale of a young girl’s struggle to succeed at a Manhattan acting conservatory. Gallagher produced with Benedetto, Shing Ka and Paul Mammano.

Gallagher will complete the film in the coming months with his frequent collaborators Ernie Mannix (music composer) and editor Alexander Yew. “Sarah Q” is a
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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