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Highway Dragnet (1954) – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Jim Henry (Richard Conte) is a decorated soldier who has just returned from the Korean War. Making his way across the country to California, he’s stopped over in Vegas to visit an Army friend. While killing time until his dinner date he cozies up to a pretty blonde in a bar before the two argue very publicly. The next day finds Jim hitchhiking out of Vegas when he is arrested by the police—for the murder of the girl he fought with the night before. Jim claims he can prove his innocence but his Army pal, on a classified mission, has disappeared, along with Jim’s alibi. Feeling railroaded, Jim manages to escape the clutches of Detective White Eagle (Reed Hadley) to go on the run.

While on the road he meets two ladies, a high-class photographer, Mrs. Cummings (Joan Bennett), and her assistant, the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Today in Soap Opera History (April 22)

1985: Guiding Light's India discovered Floyd was a killer.

1986: Santa Barbara's Kirk was released from the hospital.

1996: Days of our Lives' Kristen saw The Woman in White.

2008: As the World Turns' Lily left Oakdale."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1938: The Life of Mary Sothern ended its run on CBS Radio. The show continued in transcription form for four more years.

1963: On The Edge of Night,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (April 5)

1966: Peyton Place's David had parting words for Rodney.

1993: Days of our Lives' Jack and Billie were arrested.

1996: Sarah Brown debuted as Carly on General Hospital.

1999: Guiding Light's Danny welcomed his sister home."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1940: The final episode of Procter & Gamble radio soap opera Manhattan Mother aired. Written by Orin Tovrov, the show starred Kaye Brinker as Patricia Locke,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (March 25)

1953: The Guiding Light's Bert pestered her husband, Bill.

1969: Dark Shadows' Barnabas found a strange doll's head.

1987: B&B's Ridge & Caroline revealed their engagement.

1988: General Hospital's Simone had a miscarriage."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1953: On The Guiding Light, Bert Bauer (Charita Bauer) tried to convince her husband, Bill (Lyle Sudrow), he had to spend money to make money.

1955: On Golden Windows,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Highway Dragnet

Here’s something odd: the formative feature in Roger Corman’s proto- career. Roger gets credits for Story and Associate Producer, and learned what he needed to learn to produce two movies of his own in the same year. The modest crime thriller sees Richard Conte involved with three women during a chase on dusty desert roads: noir star Joan Bennett and young Wanda Hendrix are a suspicious pair, but special guest Hot Number Mary Beth Hughes all but steals the show.

Highway Dragnet

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1954 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 70 min. / Street Date March 20, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Richard Conte, Joan Bennett, Wanda Hendrix, Mary Beth Hughes, Reed Hadley, Iris Adrian.

Cinematography: John Martin

Film Editor: Ace Herman

Written by Herb Meadow, Jerome Oldlum from a story by U.S. Andersen, Roger Corman

Produced by Jack Jungmeyer, William F. Broidy (executive), A. Robert Nunes & Roger Corman (associates)

Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Letter from an Unknown Woman

This devastating romantic melodrama is Max Ophüls’ best American picture — perhaps because it seems so European? It’s probably Joan Fontaine’s finest hour as well, and Louis Jourdan comes across as a great actor in a part perfect for his screen personality. The theme could be called, ‘No regrets,’ but also, ‘Everything is to be regretted.’

Letter from an Unknown Woman

Blu-ray

Olive Signature

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan, Mady Christians, Marcel Journet, Art Smith, Carol Yorke, Howard Freeman, John Good, Leo B. Pessin, Erskine Sanford, Otto Waldis, Sonja Bryden.

Cinematography: Franz Planer

Film Editor: Ted J. Kent

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Written by Howard Koch from a story by Stefan Zweig

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Max Ophüls

A young woman’s romantic nature goes beyond all limits, probing the nature of True Love.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Video Essay. Under His Skin: "Raw Deal"

  • MUBI
The 26th entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi is showing Anthony Mann's Raw Deal (1948) October 26 - November 25, 2017 in the United States as part of the double feature Anthony Mann Noirs.Few film critics intend the same thing when they invoke abstraction in cinema. For some, the reference is to the purity of abstract painting, and its extension into experimental cinema; for others, it points to those moments in otherwise narrative films (such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s) when plot and characters momentarily fall away, and textures or settings surge into the foreground. For some, abstract cinema is Stan Brakhage; for others, it’s particularly kooky action movies where nothing makes much logical sense and so “pure film” takes over. Watching the remarkable series of works forged by the collaboration of director Anthony Mann and cinematographer John Alton—including T-Men (1947), Raw Deal
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Review: Synapse Films’ Suspiria 4K Restoration is a Dazzling Work of Art

  • DailyDead
The first time I ever saw Dario Argento’s Suspiria, I was very young—somewhere between eight and ten (I’m gettin’ old, so my memories are fuzzy from time to time). Regardless of whatever exact number that age might have been, I just know I was definitely too damned young, because Suspiria shattered my budding cinematic sensibilities and screwed with my tender psyche in ways that would stick with me for my entire life. It’s a movie I’ve spent a long time loving, which means I’ve been patiently waiting for Synapse’s restoration of the landmark giallo film from one of Italy’s premier Maestros of Horror.

And after three arduous years (for Synapse, not for me, obviously), the 4K restoration version of Suspiria has finally arrived, and it is absolutely well worth the wait. Not only is watching every single frame like bearing witness to a work of art,
See full article at DailyDead »

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month

1 of the Greatest Actors of the Studio Era Has His TCM Month
Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Updated: Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. On Thursday night, TCM presented five Colman star vehicles that should be popping up again in the not-too-distant future: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a phenomenal central performance. Ah, it also shows its star without his trademark mustache – about as famous at the time as Clark Gable's. Perhaps
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Unusual Post-wwii Novel That Led to 2 Movie Adaptations: One 'Straight,' One 'Gay'

Remembering Unusual Post-wwii Novel That Led to 2 Movie Adaptations: One 'Straight,' One 'Gay'
Crime novel The Blank Wall by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding. While her husband is away during World War II, housewife Lucia Holley – the sort of “Everywoman” who looks great in a two-piece bathing suit – does whatever it takes to protect the feeling of “normality” in her bourgeois, suburban household. The Blank Wall is a classic depiction of an attempted cover-up being much more serious than the actual crime. Sound bites: Remembering the classic crime novel 'The Blank Wall' and its two movie adaptations – 'The Reckless Moment' & 'The Deep End' Crime novel writer Elisabeth Sanxay Holding (1889–1955) is not a name familiar to many, and yet Raymond Chandler described her as “the top suspense writer of them all. She doesn't pour it on and make you feel irritated. Her characters are wonderful; and she has a sort of inner calm which I find very attractive.” Holding has been identified as “The Godmother of Noir” and, more
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Cult Horror, Film Noir, and Sci-Fi Movies Tonight on TCM: Ulmer Remembered

Edgar G. Ulmer movies on TCM: 'The Black Cat' & 'Detour' Turner Classic Movies' June 2017 Star of the Month is Audrey Hepburn, but Edgar G. Ulmer is its film personality of the evening on June 6. TCM will be presenting seven Ulmer movies from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, including his two best-known efforts: The Black Cat (1934) and Detour (1945). The Black Cat was released shortly before the officialization of the Christian-inspired Production Code, which would castrate American filmmaking – with a few clever exceptions – for the next quarter of a century. Hence, audiences in spring 1934 were able to witness satanism in action, in addition to other bizarre happenings in an art deco mansion located in an isolated area of Hungary. Sporting a David Bowie hairdo, Boris Karloff is at his sinister best in The Black Cat (“Do you hear that, Vitus? The phone is dead. Even the phone is dead”), ailurophobic (a.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Scar

Director Steve Sekely’s hardboiled film noir leans heavily on the talents of star-producer Paul Henreid and camera ace John Alton — the three of them whip up the best gimmick-driven noir thriller of the late ‘forties. Strained coincidences and unlikely events mean nothing when this much talent is concentrated in one movie. It’s also a terrific show for star Joan Bennett, who expresses all the disappointment, despair and angst of a noir femme who knows she’s in for more misery.

The Scar (Hollow Triumph)

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 83 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Paul Henreid, Joan Bennett, Eduard Franz, Leslie Brooks, John Qualen, Mabel Paige, Herbert Rudley, George Chandler, Robert Bice, Henry Brandon, Franklyn Farnum, Thomas Browne Henry, Norma Varden, Jack Webb.

Cinematography: John Alton

Film Editor: Fred Allen

Original Music: Sol Kaplan

Written by Daniel Fuchs from a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Beauty vs Beast: Witchy Women

Jason from Mnpp here, tackling one of my favoirte movies of all-time for this week's edition of "Beauty vs Beast" -- unless it's Halloween-time I mostly try to lean away from horror films for this series but I gotta make an exception this week, for Wednesday marks the 40th anniversary of Dario Argento's fairy-tale giallo Suspiria getting released in Italy. I love that the movie came out just in time for Valentine's Day - with its lurid reds (not to mention a character being stabbed directly in the heart) it feels tremulously appropriate for the season.

It's also a timely moment to celebrate the movie because as you might've heard A Bigger Splash and I Am Love director Luca Guadagnino is currently right this minute in the process of remaking the film, with a starry cast including Tilda Swinton and Dakota Johnson and Chloe Grace Moretz. Oh and Jessica Harper,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Video Essay. Master of Perspective: Fritz Lang's "Scarlet Street"

  • MUBI
The eighteenth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi will be showing Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street (1945) from December 30, 2016 - January 28, 2017 in the United States. In Fritz Lang’s masterpiece Scarlet Street (1945) it is never simply a matter of characters seeing or not seeing something important—although that can furnish the first, basic level of the intrigue. It is also a matter of what people really understand of what they see—which, in turn, has much to do with what they, consciously or unconsciously, project onto what is before their eyes. So, while the film is full of moments where its central figure, the ‘poor sap’ Chris Cross (Edward G. Robinson), has his eyes averted, or doesn’t hear someone creeping behind his back, it also explores his willful blindness: he looks at Kitty (Joan Bennett) and sees an innocent angel where,
See full article at MUBI »

It Came From The Tube: This House Possessed (1981)

What would happen if you crossed Demon Seed, Burnt Offerings, and The Legacy? You’d end up with a pretty confusing six hour horror movie I’d imagine, so scratch that. But what would happen if you took those same elements, made it a TV movie, and threw in The Hardy Boys’ Parker Stevenson for good measure? Well, then you’d be watching This House Possessed (1981), a supremely goofy, sublimely entertaining movie of the week that’s low on scares but high on smiles.

Broadcast on Friday, February 6th, 1981 as part of The ABC Friday Night Movie, This House Possessed was up against the CBS juggernaut The Dukes of Hazzard/Dallas, and NBC offered up…oh never mind. We were all watching the Dukes and the Ewings, okay? Is that what you want to hear? Fine. But I suppose there had to be some people who were repulsed at the
See full article at DailyDead »

Humphrey Bogart in We’Re No Angels Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

We’Re No Angels (1955) plays on the big screen at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, December 3rd at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. Admission is only $5. Other Christmas films in December are It’S A Wonderful Life at 10:30am 12/10 and White Christmas at 10:30am 12/17 and Die Hard at midnight 12/23.

“We came here to rob them and that’s what we’re gonna do – beat their heads in, gouge their eyes out, slash their throats. Soon as we wash the dishes.”

Humphrey Bogart, Peter Ustinov and Aldo Ray are the motley trio of convicts who escape from Devil’s Island prison just before Christmas in the festive 1955 comedy We’Re No Angels. They look for places to steal from and stumble across a store run by kindly but bumbling Felix
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Dark Shadows: Castmembers Reuniting for Halloween and 50th Anniversary

Dark Shadows fans are getting a Halloween treat. In honor of the show's 50th anniversary, several of the original castmembers are reuniting later this month in Hollywood.Created by Dan Curtis and developed by Art Wallace in 1966, the gothic soap centered on the lives of the wealthy Collins family. Soon, the series introduced more supernatural elements, like that of Barnabas Collins (Jonathan Frid), a 175-year-old vampire who wakes up in the present day. The cast also included Joan Bennett, Louis Edmonds, Nancy Barrett, Thayer David, and John Karlen.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Suspiria remake adds three more to its cast

Tony Sokol Oct 4, 2016

Chloe Moretz, Dakota Johnson and Tilda Swinton are all joining the remake of Dario Argento's Suspiria...

“Bad luck isn't brought by broken mirrors, but by broken minds”. And a new generation of horror fans will get their brains broken in the upcoming remake of Dario Argento’s atmospheric giallo classic Suspiria.

Frenesy Film Company and Mythology Entertainment. the companies behind the new movie, have announced that Chloe Moretz will co-star with Dakota Johnson, Tilda Swinton and Mia Goth in the upcoming thriller.

Suspiria will be directed by A Bigger Splash’s Luca Guadagnino. The screenplay is being written by David Kajganich. The film will be distributed and produced by Amazon Studios.

The original 1977 Suspiria, which was written by Argento and Dario Nicoladi, told the story of a young American ballet dancer, played by Jessica Harper, who gets accepted at a prestigious dance academy in Germany. Shortly after she enrolls,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Disney Renaissance’s Little Woman: Katharine Hepburn’s Imprint on Belle

  • MUBI
Few questions feel as stale as the following: Is the Disney Princess feminist? It's become profoundly boring to scavenge for an answer, so common is this refrain that arises each holiday season since Peggy Orenstein’s barnstorm of an essay. It will no doubt be a talking point upon the release of Moana later this year. The "Disney Princess" has congealed into a homogenous, lumpen unit of capitalist excess, so much that each character’s particular idiosyncrasies often become obscured in such discussions.Belle, the heroine of Kirk Wise and Gary Trousdale’s Beauty and the Beast (1991), is a headstrong bibliophile with a peripatetic mind; she spends the beginning of the film longing to be elsewhere. “There must be more than this provincial life,” she screams in the film’s opening number, which economically introduces us to the townspeople who fawn over her. Belle, voiced by Paige O’Hara, occupies
See full article at MUBI »

Dark Shadows: The Horror Soap Opera Debuted 50 Years Ago

Sink your teeth into this. Fifty years ago today, ABC debuted the gothic soap opera Dark Shadows.

Created by Dan Curtis and developed by Art Wallace, the drama centered on the lives of the wealthy Collins family. Soon, the series introduced more supernatural elements, like that of Barnabas Collins (Jonathan Frid), a 175-year-old vampire who wakes up in the present day. The cast also included Joan Bennett, Louis Edmonds, Nancy Barrett, Thayer David, and John Karlen.

Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »
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