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2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?

2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?
The Cannes Film Festival just wrapped up its 71st edition and the film with the biggest Oscar potential got a big boost at the closing ceremony. Spike Lee’s, “BlacKkKlansman,” the true story of an African-American cop who infiltrated the Kkk, took home the Grand Prix, the second highest prize of the festival. It was Lee’s first time competing on the Croisette since 1991 when “Jungle Fever” was in competition and was a bit of retribution for Lee after his widely acclaimed 1989 film, “Do the Right Thing,” received nothing from the jury.

If “BlacKkKlansman” were to get nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, it would be the second time a Grand Prix winner has gotten into the race for Oscar’s top honor. The first was “Life is Beautiful” in 1998. Thirteen past Grand Prix winners went on to earn 22 total Oscar nominations with five films scoring seven wins. Each
See full article at Gold Derby »

Japanese Director Hirokazu Kore-eda’s ‘Shoplifters’ Wins Palme d’Or at Cannes

Japanese Director Hirokazu Kore-eda’s ‘Shoplifters’ Wins Palme d’Or at Cannes
Cannes — Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda won the Palme d’Or at the 71st Cannes Film Festival for his film “Shoplifters,” marking just the second time this century that an Asian film has claimed the festival’s top prize (the other being Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” in 2010). A moving portrait of a self-made family whose secret ultimately jeopardizes their ability to stay together, the widely praised drama represents Hore-eda’s fifth time in competition, making him one of the few veterans in a lineup weighted toward less established directors.

American director Spike Lee won the Grand Prix for his blaxploitation-styled anti-racism satire “BlacKkKlansman,” one of just two American films in the official competition. After accepting the prize “on behalf of the People’s Republic of Brooklyn, New York,” Lee told the press, “Cannes was the perfect launchpad for this film. I hope the film
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Dogman’

Italy is a culture that pushes macho to the extreme (that’s essentially what the Mafia is), but Marcello (Marcello Fonte), the hero of Matteo Garrone’s “Dogman,” is one of those Italian men who’s so harmless he’s cuddly. Short and stooped, with an oblong head and droopy-lidded big eyes that look out at the world with pleading innocence, he’s like Michael Corleone reincarnated as a depressed puppy. Even Fredo could stomp this guy.

Marcello owns and runs a dog-grooming parlor along a ratty stretch of beach town in Southern Italy that’s so desolate it looks like a bomb hit it and left the buildings standing. You wonder how anyone could sustain a business there — but, in fact, there’s a little community, made up mostly of the men who work at the local trattoria and the cash-for-gold pawn shop next to Marcello’s canine parlor,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movies New to Netflix in April: ‘Seven,’ ‘The Iron Giant,’ ‘Scarface’ and More

April showers might bring May flowers, but what to do during the rainy season? Why, modern movie-lover does when the weather outside is frightful, curl up with some Netflix. (Maybe get some chill in there, if you’re lucky). While not the most romantic of movies, classic crime lovers can enjoy Brian De Palma’s “Scarface,” which lands on the platform next month. After you get your fix of an infinitely quotable and smoldering Al Pacino, you can jump ahead to the equally as disturbing David Fincher classic, “Seven.”

A few tear-jerking Oscar winners also head to Netflix in April, including the Nicole Kidman, Renée Zellweger-starring “Cold Mountain,” and Roberto Benigni’s WWII drama “Life Is Beautiful.” For lighter fare, check out “The Iron Giant,” or both live-action “The Flinstones” movies (for my Rosie O’Donnell die-hards).

Hopefully, that’s enough to keep you busy until May. Check out
See full article at Indiewire »

Did the 2008 Oscars get it right?

Simon Brew Mar 2, 2018

2008 saw No Country For Old Men, Tilda Swinton and The Golden Compass take home Oscar gold...

Films have a habit of being judged twice at the very least. There’s the instant reaction, through box office and awards season. Then there’s the more circumspect view, as a film has dropped out of the original limelight it bathed in.

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As it's Oscar weekend, therefore, we’re continuing a Den Of Geek tradition, and going back a decade, to see how the films that were rewarded at the 2008 ceremony stand up today. It wasn’t a show without the odd surprise, but it was still one of the least contentious Oscar nights in recent memory, hosted by Jon Stewart. And
See full article at Den of Geek »

Oscars 2018: YouTube Reveals Best-Picture Leaderboard, but Views Don’t Always Mean Wins

Every year like clockwork, numerous tech companies and data-analytics outfits trot out predictions, based on various metrics and methodologies, about who is likely to win the big prize at the Oscars.

Spoiler alert: Their track record isn’t terribly reliable.

So take YouTube’s ranking of the 2018 Oscar best-picture nominees, based on trailer views, with the grain of salt it is.

If YouTube data were any guide, Christopher Nolan’s World War II epic “Dunkirk” is in the pole position to take home the Academy Awards trophy for best picture. Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” came in second in terms of views, followed by Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” and Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird.”

But history shows that predicting “Dunkirk” as the 2018 best-picture winner based on trailer views is probably not a safe bet (although to be fair, YouTube doesn’t
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tom Hanks (‘Forrest Gump’) will love you like Jenny after being voted top Best Actor Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]

Tom Hanks (‘Forrest Gump’) will love you like Jenny after being voted top Best Actor Oscar winner of 1990s [Poll Results]
Tom Hanks has been voted the top Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s for his titular role in “Forrest Gump.” Gold Derby’s recent poll asking you to vote for your favorite of the decade came down to Hanks and … Hanks, who won the previous year for “Philadelphia.”

Hanks’ “Forrest Gump” performance won the poll with an impressive 47% of the vote, followed by Hanks’ performance in “Philadelphia” at 24%. Anthony Hopkins in “The Silence of the Lambs” was next with 18%, and no other contender came close. The next highest was Al Pacino in “Scent of a Woman” at 4% and then Kevin Spacey in “American Beauty” at 3%. Nicolas Cage in “Leaving Las Vegas” was next with 2%, then a tie at 1% between Jack Nicholson in “As Good as It Gets” and Roberto Benigni in “Life Is Beautiful.” Two Best Actor winners did not earn a percentage point — Jeremy Irons in “Reversal of Fortune
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary family album on March 4

Oscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary family album on March 4
In recent days we have reminded you of the two Oscars family album events that happened in 1998 for the 70th anniversary and 2003 for the 75th ceremony. Click on each of those to watch the highly entertaining assemblies of many living actors and actresses from acting categories.

And now, the 90th anniversary show is already being prepared by producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd to air Sunday, March 4, on ABC with returning host Jimmy Kimmel. Would that duo want to take on the challenge of assembling such an all-star gathering on the Dolby Theatre stage in Hollywood? Would they be able to convince 90 of the 156 living actresses and actors who won in competitive categories (or received honorary trophies for acting) to join together for a lengthy 15-minute segment?

See Oscar Best Picture Gallery: History of Every Academy Award-Winning Movie

Full lists are below of the people who would be contacted about attending.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Luca Guadagnino, Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer Talk Oscar Noms in Italy

Luca Guadagnino, Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer Talk Oscar Noms in Italy
Rome — Luca Guadagnino, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer were cheered by the press in Italy on Wednesday as “Call Me by Your Name” finally gets ready to hit theaters in the country where it was shot, months after its release in the U.S. and other major markets.

Guadagnino, Chalamet and Hammer were on hand in Rome to promote the film a day after it scooped four Academy Award nominations back in the U.S.

“It’s been a very long journey,” Guadagnino told a packed press conference, “both from the point of view of my personal journey as a director and of the life of this specific film, which started at Sundance last year.” He was answering a question by a radio reporter who noted that “Chiamami col tuo nome,” as the pic is titled in Italian, marks the first film by an Italian director to score Oscar nominations outside the foreign-language category since Roberto Benigni’s “[link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?
With their wins at Sunday’s Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”) and Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) continue their march toward becoming the first foursome to sweep the Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice, SAG, BAFTA and Oscar. Their SAG victories are the most important ones of the three groups so far, as the SAGs have a fantastic correlation with the Oscars; SAG has only missed five times in Best Actor, six times in Best Actress, nine times in Best Supporting Actor and seven times in Best Supporting Actress. But despite so much overlap between the individual races, SAG does not go 4-for-4 with Oscar in one season as often as you might think.

Over its 23-year history, SAG has only had a direct match in all four Oscar acting races six times, most recently three years ago. SAG typically goes 3-for-4 with Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Iraq invasion in 2003 almost cancelled 75th anniversary Oscars family album reunion of 59 acting winners [Watch]

The 75th anniversary ceremony for the Academy Awards almost didn’t happen as scheduled. When America led an invasion of Iraq that weekend, broadcast network ABC pleaded with producer Gil Cates and Academy president Frank Piersen to move the event back a week. The duo claimed it would be too expensive to make the switch and that the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood would be unavailable.

On March 23, 2003, the ceremony went live on ABC as scheduled, hosted by comedian, actor, and writer Steve Martin, with the Best Picture proclaimed to be “Chicago.” However, several presenters such as Cate Blanchett, Jim Carrey, and Will Smith cancelled their appearances. That day’s events also caused several past winners to bail out on appearing in the Oscars family album slated for late in the show. Similar to a segment five years early for the 70th anniversary show (read more on the link above), the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Blu-ray Review – The Voice of the Moon (1990)

The Voice of the Moon (La Voce Della Luna, 1990)

Directed by Federico Fellini

Starring Roberto Benigni, Paolo Villaggio, Nadia Ottaviani, Marisa Tomasi, Angelo Orlando, Syusy Blady

Synopsis:

A recently released patient from a mental hospital has a series of fantastic adventures amidst a surreal landscape while trying to win the affections of his love.

Federico Fellini’s last film is a jaw-dropping experience. Bringing together a surreal template of dream logic with wry humour and sardonic swipes at society, The Voice of the Moon – or in Italian, La Voce Della Luna – provides the magical realism and wonder of life that the Italian filmmaker is best known for.

Adapted from Ermanno Cavazzoni’s poetic novel, the story follows the recently released mental patient Ivo Salvini (Roberto Benigni, Life is Beautiful) as he navigates his way around a strange and compelling landscape. He encounters the entrancing Aldina (Nadia Ottaviani) by accident and falls in love immediately.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Asia Argento, More Models Detail Harvey Weinstein’s Italian Connection (Exclusive)

Asia Argento, More Models Detail Harvey Weinstein’s Italian Connection (Exclusive)
Actress-director Asia Argento, and models Samantha Panagrosso and Zoe Brock have come forward with new details heightening the scrutiny on Fabrizio Lombardo, the former head of a short-lived Miramax Italy unit, and who allegedly acted as a procurer of women for Harvey Weinstein.

Two of the three women Variety spoke to also claim they were sexually assaulted by Weinstein. Panagrosso, in the latest set of allegations against Weinstein, says she was groped by the Hollywood mogul in a hotel swimming pool in Cannes, and then assaulted in the cabin of a yacht during the 2003 film festival. Brock alleges she was tricked into going back to Weinstein’s hotel, and Argento alleges she was raped by Weinstein after being taken by Lombardo to Weinstein’s room, a claim he has refuted.

Lombardo has denied Argento’s claims in a statement. Variety has reached out to his Italian lawyer for further comment.

In an interview with Variety,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Harvey Weinstein: His Career Timeline of Sexual Harassment Allegations

Harvey Weinstein: His Career Timeline of Sexual Harassment Allegations
In this week’s missile of a The New York Times story about the many alleged indiscretions of Harvey Weinstein, one of his past colleagues, former Miramax Los Angeles president Mark Gill, describes Weinstein’s professional climb from indie producer to Hollywood titan. “From the outside, it seemed golden — the Oscars, the success, the remarkable cultural impact.” Yet Gill said the persistent whispers that Weinstein was mistreating women were in fact “the biggest mess of all.”

While The Weinstein Co. co-founder publicly championed women’s rights, his accusers say that he was a hypocrite, secretly propositioning them for massages, kisses and more. One month after Weinstein distributed “The Hunting Ground,” a documentary about rapes on university campuses, he allegedly groped a college-aged woman in his office. Weinstein, 65, has a well-documented, on-the-record history of unflattering behavior, even against women (like in 2002, when he publicly berated director Julie Taymor at a screening of her film,
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Worst Reviewed Films on Rotten Tomatoes, From ‘Ridiculous 6’ to ‘Pinocchio’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
10 Worst Reviewed Films on Rotten Tomatoes, From ‘Ridiculous 6’ to ‘Pinocchio’ (Photos)
“Flatliners” is the worst reviewed movie of the Fall so far, and one of the worst-reviewed movies of the year. But it’s not the worst reviewed film of all time. Check which ones are, courtesy of Rotten Tomatoes, ranked by number of reviews. “Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever” (2002) Average Score: 2.59 # of Reviews: 116 Tomatometer: 0 Cast: Antonio Banderas, Lucy LiuOne Missed Call” (2008) Average Score: 2.48 # of Reviews: 80 Tomatometer: 0 Cast: Shannyn Sossamon, Edwards Burns “Pinocchio” (2002) Average Score: 2.36 # of Reviews: 55 Tomatometer: 0 Cast: Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta BraschiA Thousand Words” (2012) Average Score: 3.18 # of Reviews: 54 Tomatometer: 0 Cast: Eddie Murphy, Kerry Washington, Allison JanneySuperbabies: Baby Geniuses 2” (2004) Average.
See full article at The Wrap »

Remembering Jerry Lewis, the World’s First Rock Star of Imbecility

Remembering Jerry Lewis, the World’s First Rock Star of Imbecility
Jerry Lewis, who died last week at 91, was hardly the first comedian to make people laugh by acting transcendently idiotic. The Marx Brothers took hilarious head-spinning dives into the outer limits of surreal silliness. So did Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello and the Three Stooges. But Jerry Lewis was the world’s first rock star of imbecility.

If you watch one of his comedy routines with Dean Martin from the ’40s and ’50s, you see something amazing. Martin, brandishing his sleepy-eyed cocktail-lounge machismo, was the straight man, and Lewis, flitting and prancing around him, was a one-man circus of slapstick brain damage — he jumped on people, he brayed out words in a mincing baby voice, he crossed his eyes and giggled at his own jokes, and every so often he slipped in a crack so smart that it let you know everything he was doing was a put-on. Yet it was Martin, the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Remembering Jerry Lewis, the World’s First Rock Star of Imbecility

Remembering Jerry Lewis, the World’s First Rock Star of Imbecility
Jerry Lewis, who died last week at 91, was hardly the first comedian to make people laugh by acting transcendently idiotic. The Marx Brothers took hilarious head-spinning dives into the outer limits of surreal silliness. So did Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello and the Three Stooges. But Jerry Lewis was the world’s first rock star of imbecility.

If you watch one of his comedy routines with Dean Martin from the ’40s and ’50s, you see something amazing. Martin, brandishing his sleepy-eyed cocktail-lounge machismo, was the straight man, and Lewis, flitting and prancing around him, was a one-man circus of slapstick brain damage — he jumped on people, he brayed out words in a mincing baby voice, he crossed his eyes and giggled at his own jokes, and every so often he slipped in a crack so smart that it let you know everything he was doing was a put-on. Yet it was Martin, the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol,
See full article at Indiewire »
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