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Patrick Stewart Teases Writers Room of New Star Trek Series

Joseph Baxter Sep 24, 2018

The TV return of Patrick Stewart to his iconic role of Jean-Luc Picard kicks off with a tweet teasing first the writers room meeting.

CBS All Access’s untitled Star Trek Jean-Luc Picard spinoff series is quickly becoming a reality, as a tweet of the newly-launched writers room from star Patrick Stewart reveals.

Stewart, who made the official announcement of the Star Trek: The Next Generation follow-up series back in August, tweeted a photo of the former-and-soon-to-return Picard actor’s proverbial ready room, joined by a creative coalition consisting of Kirsten Beyer (Star Trek: Discovery), Michael Chabon (Spider-Man 2), Akiva Goldsman (Star Trek: Discovery), Diandra Pendleton-Thompson (Awakening Love) and James Duff (Major Crimes). Indeed, Stewart’s accompanying caption, “The journey has begun,” is enough to stoke excitement amongst even the most lapsed of Trekkies.

The journey has begun. Kirsten Beyer, Michael Chabon, Akiva Goldsman, Diandra Pendleton-Thompson, James Duff,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Zienia Merton obituary

Actor who found TV fame in the 1970s science fiction series Space: 1999

The actor Zienia Merton, who has died aged 72, appeared regularly on British television during a 50-year career during which she found fame as one of the regular cast of the Gerry Anderson science fiction series Space: 1999, which ran from 1975 until 1977 and has retained a cult following.

Set on the moon – which has been propelled through space owing to a thermonuclear explosion – Space: 1999 was filmed at Pinewood Studios in Buckinghamshire, and starred the Us actors Martin Landau and Barbara Bain. Merton played the data analyst Sandra Benes, one of only two of the show’s regular supporting cast to be brought back for the second season. She left the series at one point but was lured back with the promise that the character would play a more prominent role in later stories, and appeared in 37 of the show’s 48 episodes.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bedtime Stories and Parties with Mel Brooks: Martin Landau's Daughter Remembers Life with Her Legendary Dad

Bedtime Stories and Parties with Mel Brooks: Martin Landau's Daughter Remembers Life with Her Legendary Dad
Martin Landau’s daughter Susie Landau Finch tells People growing up with the Hollywood star made for a very exciting childhood.

“No one day was the same. He was full of excitement and would tell me amazing bedtime stories and was always making funny voices – so much that he scared my little sister,” she says.

The actor, who won an Academy Award in 1994 for the Tim Burton-directed Ed Wood, came to fame playing a villain in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest and later in the original Mission: Impossible TV show on CBS. He died at UCLA Medical Center
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Martin Landau's Epic Love with Mission: Impossible Costar Barbara Bain: Inside Their 36-Year Romance

Martin Landau's Epic Love with Mission: Impossible Costar Barbara Bain: Inside Their 36-Year Romance
Martin Landau and Barbara Bain had a love meant for the screen.

Oscar winner Landau, who died Saturday at at age 89 after a brief illness, rose through the ranks in Hollywood alongside his Mission: Impossible costar Bain, as their marriage spanned 36 years and two children before they divorced in 1993.

Their romance got off to an unlikely start when Bain showed up to one of Landau’s classes at the Actors Studio in New York.

“I thought she was an empty-headed model, a magazine cover wired for sound,” he told People back in 1976 of his first impression of Bain. “I had hair down to my shoulders,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winner & ‘Ed Wood’ Star, Dies At 89

  • Uinterview
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau died Saturday night, aged 89. Martin Landau Dead At 89 Landau’s publicist Dick Guttman said the actor died of unexpected complications during a short stay at UCLA Medical Center. Landau gained fame in the 1960s as Rollin Hand on Mission: Impossible the TV show. His real-life wife, Barbara Bain, also starred in the show. […]

Source: uInterview

The post Martin Landau, Oscar-Winner & ‘Ed Wood’ Star, Dies At 89 appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

Oscar Winner Martin Landau Dead At Age 89

  • CinemaRetro
Landau (center) with "Mission:Impossible" co-stars (clockwise) Peter Graves, Greg Morris, Peter Lupus and Barbara Bain.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away at age 89. Landau had originally intended to be a cartoonist before studying at the esteemed Actors Studio in New York City. With his intense looks and persona, he began to be noticed by Hollywood studios. In 1959 he was cast as James Mason's gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "North by Northwest". It was Landau who suggested playing the role as a not-so-closeted homosexual, a rather daring strategy for the era. The result made Landau standout in a cast of heavyweights that included Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and Leo G. Carroll. Roles in epic films such as "Cleopatra" and "The Greatest Story Ever Told" followed. Landau also appeared regularly on popular TV programs including "The Twilight Zone", "The Untouchables", "I Spy", "The Wild,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89
Martin Landau, the Oscar-winning Ed Wood actor who appeared in Crimes & Misdemeanors, North by Northwest and the Mission: Impossible TV series over a career that spanned over 50 years, died Saturday at the age of 89.

Landau died following "unexpected complications during a short hospitalization" at the UCLA Medical Center, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter.

The actor spent five years as a newspaper cartoonist in his native New York before deciding to focus on acting; As Landau often stated, he and Steve McQueen were notably the only two applicants accepted into
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film News: Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Los Angeles – His acting career spanned from working with Alfred Hitchcock to Tim Burton. Along the way, he had significant TV and film roles including a Best Supporting Oscar win for portraying Bela Lugosi in Burton’s “Ed Wood”. Martin Landau died in Los Angeles on July 15, 2017. He was 89.

He was one of the rare actors known both for distinctive parts in both television and film, and had a revival in his career towards the end of his life. Besides working for directors Hitchcock and Burton, he also has roles in films by Woody Allen, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Francis Ford Coppola and Frank Darabont. On television, he had an early role on “Mission: Impossible in the 1960s, and another on the cult series “Space :1999”

Martin Landau in a 2013 Appearance in Chicago

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Martin Landau was born in Brooklyn, New York,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Martin Landau Dead at 89: Oscar-Winning Actor in Ed Wood, Mission: Impossible

Martin Landau Dead at 89: Oscar-Winning Actor in Ed Wood, Mission: Impossible
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has died at age 89 after a brief illness.

The versatile Hollywood star, who won an Academy Award in 1994 for the Tim Burton-directed Ed Wood, came to fame playing a villain in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest and later in the original Mission: Impossible TV show on CBS.

Landau died at UCLA Medical Center on Saturday afternoon following “unexpected complications during a short hospitalization,” according to a statement from his reps late Sunday.

“We are overcome with sadness to report the death of iconic actor Martin Landau,” statement said.

“He had just celebrated his 89th birthday.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Mission: Impossible and Ed Wood Star, Dead at 89
Oscar winner Martin Landau died Saturday of “unexpected complications” following a brief stay at UCLA Medical Center, per The Hollywood Reporter. He was 89.

Landau got his big break when he was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 film North by Northwest. In 1966, he began his star-making role as master of disguise Rollin Hand in the small screen Mission: Impossible, for which he earned the Golden Globe award as well as several Emmy nominations. In the series, Landau starred alongside then-wife Barbara Bain. It would mark the first of two small-screen collaborations for the couple, who later co-starred in the 1970s science-fiction program Space: 1999.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89

Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89
Martin Landau, a screen giant who brought his one-of-a-kind talents to Hollywood for more than 60 years, has died at 89. TMZ first reported the news, stating that the actor died yesterday of “unexpected complications” after briefly being hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center.

Read MoreGeorge Romero, Horror Icon and ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Director, Dies at 77

Landau won a richly deserved Academy Award for his role as Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s “Ed Wood,” having previously been nominated for both “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Tucker: The Man and His Dream”; he also had three Golden Globes, six Emmy nominations, a BAFTA nod and several lifetime achievement awards to his name. More than that, though, he had an inimitable screen presence that both delighted and, when called for, unsettled.

Landau first came to wide attention for his performance in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest,” going on to appear in “Cleopatra,
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Landau, star of TV's 'Mission: Impossible', dies at 89

  • ScreenDaily
Martin Landau, star of TV's 'Mission: Impossible', dies at 89
Oscar-winning star of Ed Wood turned down role of Spock in Star Trek.

Martin Landau, who won the Oscar for Ed Wood and made his name in the TV series Mission: Impossible, has died in Los Angeles following complications during a hospital visit. He was 89.

Landau was born June 28, 1928, in Brooklyn and worked as a newspaper cartoonist before the call of entertainment became too strong to resist.

He found fame in entertainment in the 1960s TV spy series Mission: Impossible, starring opposite his then wife Barbara Bain.

The couple also played alongside each other in the 1970s sci-fi episodic Space 1999. Landau appeared in many TV shows – earning an Emmys nod for Without a Trace in 2005 – and famously turned down the role of Spock in Star Trek, which eventually went to Leonard Nimoy.

In film he got his big break as the villainous James Woods’ lieutenant Leonard in Alfred Hitchcock’s North By Northwest. Roles included
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Guest Post: What Inspired Me to Make a Film About Retirees

Silver Skies

Guest Post by Rosemary Rodriguez

There’s an abundance of turmoil, fear, anger, and hatred expressed through images that come at us 24/7 through social media, TV, and movies. As a society, we are more visual than ever, and we have more choices of entertainment than ever in our history. As a director, it’s crucial for me to listen to my heart because in the end, that’s where my stories live. And my life revolves around telling them.

My newest film, “Silver Skies,” was inspired by my parents. They adopted me when my mother was 42 years old, so I was very young watching them get older. I saw their struggles firsthand, and watched them become invisible to the world around them. I saw how their relationships with work, their friends, their family, and each other changed as they aged. The most important thing to them was staying independent, financially and physically. When these declined, it hit them hard.

When we are young, we make decisions that will affect the rest of our lives. My hope is that watching “Silver Skies” will make people of all ages think about their own lives, their own goals, and their own dreams. I want them to look at the people around them differently, and to think about their decisions more carefully — to consider how the choices they make now will affect them in the long-term.

My first movie, “Acts of Worship,” was about homeless drug addicts, who, like older people, are dismissed in our society. I love giving characters that are marginalized a voice. Seniors and drug addicts are in that category: Easy to pass on the street, or walk around them quickly because they’re just in the way.

Today, more than ever, it’s crucial to tell stories about people different than we are, yet have the same struggles and desires. Movies have that power. They bring empathy, compassion, insight, and a commonality that we may not experience otherwise.

Movies help us get inside another person’s life and connect to their humanity. Powerful movies live in our imagination forever.

The real challenge with independent movies today isn’t making them; it’s getting them seen. Distribution costs are massive. Marketing money has to be in every budget before shooting. It’s not a luxury; it’s crucial. Making noise to cut through all the other TV and movie options out there is daunting, to say the least. This has been my biggest obstacle with “Silver Skies.” Yes, there are more ways to show a movie. Yes, millions of people have access to a movie. But how will they find it? That’s what keeps me up at night.

What I hear repeated a lot is that a movie has to be a “movement not just a movie.” Frankly, I’m not even sure what that means. All I know is that when I sit in a dark theater with an audience watching “Silver Skies,” they take the ride with some amazing senior actors: George Hamilton, Barbara Bain, Jack McGee, Mariette Hartley, Jack Betts, Alex Rocco, and Valerie Perrine. At some point, they stop seeing the actors and begin to see themselves and their lives on screen. That’s what they tell me. They thank me for showing that seniors are not stereotypes like the grouchy grandparent or the butt of a joke. Seniors have sexual lives; they fall in love; they fight; they work at jobs with crazy bosses; they get jolted by injustice; they worry about finances. They deal with the same issues that we all do. The audiences laughs and they cry. When I’m fortunate enough to experience my movie alongside them, my heart is full like nothing else matters in the world. Then I start thinking about my next movie…..

Silver Skies” will begin streaming April 4 on Amazon and iTunes.

Rosemary Rodriguez wrote and directed the Sundance feature film “Acts of Worship,” which was nominated for two Independent Spirit Awards. Her episodic TV work includes “Jessica Jones,” “The Good Wife,” and “The Walking Dead.” Rodriguez is currently directing a documentary about renowned graffiti writer Lee Quinones, and her next dramatic feature will be “Loose Girl,” based on the memoir by Kerry Cohen. She hosts “The Director’s Chair,” a podcast on iTunes.

https://medium.com/media/6df4f3ffc22475ba59bd1e916f576518/href

Guest Post: What Inspired Me to Make a Film About Retirees was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Silver Skies on DVD, Amazon and iTunes April 4th – Stars George Hamilton and Valerie Perrine

Silver Skies debuts on DVD, Amazon and iTunes April 4th

When Dana Jung reviewed Silver Skies here at We Are Movie Geeks, he wrote “.…. there’s no better way to spend a couple of hours than skipping down memory lane with the old friends of Silver Skies.” Read all of Dana’s review Here

And read my interview with Silver Skies director Rosemary Rodriguez Here

With humor and compassion, Silver Skies chronicles the unexpected developments that occur when a group of eccentric seniors have their lives turned upside down by the sale of their beloved apartment complex. A refreshingly original story about getting older and trying to hold tight to the American Dream, the film features a cast of much-loved screen icons: George Hamilton, Valerie Perrine, Barbara Bain, Jack McGee, Alex Rocco, Mariette Hartley, Jack Betts, and Howard Hesseman. Far from playing their usual roles, however, the actors fully inhabit
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Mission Impossible: The Action Series Premiered 50 Years Ago

It's almost impossible to believe, but Mission: Impossible made its debut on CBS 50 years ago today.Created by Bruce Geller, the action-adventure drama followed the missions of top secret government agents. Over the show's run, the cast included Greg Morris, Peter Lupus, Peter Graves, Steven Hill, Barbara Bain, Barbara Anderson, Martin Landau, Leonard Nimoy, Lesley Ann Warren, and Sam Elliott.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Sliff 2015 Review – Silver Skies

Silver Skies screens Sunday November 8th at 6:45pm at The Tivoli Theater as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The film’s director, Rosemary Rodriguez, will be in attendance and will receive Sliff’s ‘Women in Film’ Award.Ticket information for the event can be found Here

Review by Dana Jung.

Today, more than ever, with our shortened attention spans, inundation by multi-media delivery systems, and almost obsessive need for instant information, it is easy to forget the wonderful actors of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s who inspired and influenced us. So many great moments created by sometimes iconic performers live on in the movies and television of certain eras. From Mr. Spock to Archie Bunker, Annie Hall to James Bond, or Mrs. Peel to Lieutenant Columbo, these and other memorable characters fueled everything from fashion choices to sexual fantasies. That’s why the new
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015 Interview: Rosemary Rodriguez – Director of Silver Skies

Silver Skies screens Sunday November 8th at 6:45pm at The Tivoli Theater as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The film’s director, Rosemary Rodriguez, will be in attendance and will receive Sliff’s ‘Women in Film’ Award.Ticket information for the event can be found Here

With humor and compassion, Silver Skies chronicles the unexpected developments that occur when a group of eccentric seniors have their lives turned upside down by the sale of their beloved apartment complex. A refreshingly original story about getting older and trying to hold tight to the American Dream, the film features a cast of much-loved screen icons: George Hamilton, Valerie Perrine, Barbara Bain, Jack McGee, Alex Rocco, Mariette Hartley, Jack Betts, and Howard Hesseman. Far from playing their usual roles, however, the actors fully inhabit characters of real complexity: Long-time pals Phil and Nick (Hamilton and McGee) tenderly
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

St. Louis International Film Festival Selects Nominees For Awfj Eda Awards

The St. Louis International Film Festival has announced the films nominated for the Awfj Eda Awards.

Awfj will partner once again with Sliff to recognize the Best Female-Directed Narrative Feature and Best Female-Directed Documentary. The 24th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival will be held Nov. 5-15, 2015. Check out the full lineup here.

Here’s a glimpse of the films that have been selected:

Narratives

Fidelio: Alice’S Odyssey – Lucie Borleteau (France)

A rare woman in the man’s world of seafaring, 30-year-old Alice signs on as a replacement engineer on the freighter Fidélio. Although she loves her job and does it well, Alice remains a woman even when wearing greasy blue overalls, and there’s some doubt that the all-male crew will remain totally insensitive to her charms. The situation has further complications: Alice has a fiancé back on shore, but when she discovers that the Fidélio is captained by Gaël,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Conversation With Director Rosemary Rodriguez About Her New Film 'Silver Skies'

I had the pleasure of speaking with writer and director Rosemary Rodriguez in midtown Manhattan two days before her film "Silver Skies" will have its United States premiere at the Woodstock Film Festival on Saturday October 3.

Rosemary Rodriguez wrote and directed the feature, "Acts of Worship, "which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, was nominated for two Independent Spirit Awards, including the John Cassavetes Award for Best Feature. Her episodic TV work includes "Empire," "The Good Wife," (where she is a regular director), "Manhattan," "Rake," "Elementary" and "Vegas." She is currently directing the new Marvel series on Netflix, "Jessica Jones."

"Silver Skies," Rosemary’s second feature, chronicles a group of seniors whose lives turn upside down when their Los Angeles apartment complex threatens to be sold out from under them.

We began our conversation talking about the evolution of "Silver Skies."

Rodriguez : It took about ten years. I ended up going to the MacDowell Colony with an outline for "Silver Skies" and wrote the script while I was there. Then, when I directed a "Law and Order" episode, I hit it off with (star) Dennis Farina and he loved the script. He helped to get the movie made. Fast forward almost two years later I called Dennis and told him we got the money. We picked the start date, and then he passed away two weeks later. I was devastated when he passed away. But then things fell in place. Fred Roos and Arthur Sarkissian came to the reading of the script, and they said, ‘let’s do this movie.’ The movie is dedicated to Dennis. He was my guardian angel.

Kouguell: In "Silver Skies," the theme of ageism is tackled straight on. The characters in this ensemble piece are threatened with the possible loss of their homes and livelihood. You describe "Silver Skies" as very personal and inspired by your parents’ aging. The characters of Nick and Phil are inspired by your father, who was a bookie in Boston, and the character, Eve, by your mother.

Rodriguez : Valerie Perrine’s character always has flowers; that was my mother. I watched my parents get old when I was still young. I saw how their relationships changed. You think logic would say life would get easier when you get older, but the emotional truth is that life still happens on its own terms. I think seniors don’t have a voice in this world. These are people who want to have sex. They want to work. They want to spend money. Make money. Have money.

Kouguell: You don’t shy away from thought-provoking issues, facing this generation, including the sexual assault of one female character and another main character’s choice she made of personal survival that causes the death of her spouse.

Rodriguez : My role model for directors is Robert Altman. His movies were a slice of life. The ironic thing about being a human being on this planet is that you have no idea what is going to happen next. The movie is real life. You’re going on a roller coaster ride; there are parts you’re laughing because life is like that, and then the rug gets pulled right out from under you.

The issues women go through, and with this female character with her husband abusing her, and feeling guilty over surviving, doing whatever she had to survive, whatever way she needed to behave was maybe ‘not as a good girl’ would, and coming to terms with that. Sexual abuse to elders is real. Elder abuse is real. I wanted to bring that issue in, as well as bring in that feminist message in there.

Kouguell: In "Silver Skies," the trepidation and excitement of newfound love is complicated by raw emotion as seen in one character’s personal and financial insecurities with a recent widow.

Rodriguez : Love doesn’t stop people at a certain age, it doesn’t stop their desires. It doesn’t matter what age we are. To work with these wonderful actors and Alex Rocco in particular -- he was just like a teenage boy when doing his scenes with Valerie Perrine, saying: “I’m used to playing killers, I’m not used to playing lovers.”

(Alex Rocco passed away July 18 of this year.)

Rodriguez : The recent memorial for Alex was on the racetrack: “Friends of Rocco” – it was the seventh race, it was dedicated to him. I loved him dearly. I miss him dearly. It was intended as a celebration of this wonderful man. His character reminds me of my dad. As I told my dad when it became clear he had to retire, I told him, “You always wanted to go out a winner.”

Kouguell: The film stars Barbara Bain, George Hamilton, Jack McGee, Valerie Perrine, Mariette Hartley, Howard Hesseman, Jack Betts, and Alex Rocco. Did they have any input into the script?

Rodriguez : They definitely did. They stuck to the script a lot. I’m a big collaborator; I want to hear what people have to say. In the film George Hamilton’s character is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. Jack McGee’s brother, George Hamilton’s mother, and my dad, all had Alzehimer’s and we shared our respective experiences to further develop George’s character. In a way it was a tribute for George to his mother, for Jack to his brother, and mine to my father.

Kouguell: You’ve earned great success as a director on "The Good Wife." How has directing television influenced your work as a director on "Silver Skies"?

Rodriguez : I can work efficiently and quickly, and in television that’s some of the skill set that gets developed. My instincts are very sharp. The idea out there is that we’re less creative working in television, but the real truth is we’re under such pressure that we can make decisions quickly, and also go with your heart and instincts. It’s very quick and very satisfying, and of course millions of people see your work in a shorter window of time and that is opposite of a movie.

Kouguell: Currently, you are the 4th Vice President of the Directors Guild of America. Although there is more media attention on the low percentage of women directors getting work in the industry, the numbers are still not rising fast enough.

Rodriguez : The DGA works very hard and we all work hard to address the issue of diversity. It’s been a problem for many years. My involvement in the DGA is reflective of how much the DGA cares about women directors and minority directors, and wants to get us out there. It’s a benefit to the Guild. There’s a lot of content there now and opportunity for diversity. I want to be meeting with you in a few years when this isn’t an issue any more; where there are not “female directors” – that there are just great storytellers and that we don’t have to separate each other.

Kouguell: Some final words about "Silver Skies"?

Rodriguez: The way these actors enriched my life was unexpected and so profound. These are people with 50 and 60-year careers in a tough industry. These actors showed up and put their hearts in these characters. They’re artists. They were there for the love for what they do. They just loved the characters. They had beautiful chemistry together. We are part of each other’s lives. I never could give back to them what they gave to me.

"Silver Skies" premieres at the Woodstock Film Festival on Saturday, October 3. http://www.woodstockfilmfestival.com/

Award-winning screenwriter and filmmaker, Susan Kouguell teaches screenwriting at Purchase College Suny, and presents international seminars on screenwriting and film. Author of Savvy Characters Sell Screenplays! and The Savvy Screenwriter, she is chairperson of Su-City Pictures East, LLC, a consulting company founded in 1990 where she works with writers, filmmakers, and executives worldwide. www.su-city-pictures.com, http://su-city-pictures.com/wpblog
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Watch: George Hamilton Spies a Beauty Over Breakfast in Exclusive 'Silver Skies' Clip

Read More: Woodstock Film Festival Celebrates 16 Years in Official Poster Art  Fresh off her work on the upcoming Netflix series "Jessica Jones," Rosemary Rodriguez (whose credits also include "The Good Wife" and "Empire") has written and directed the ensemble comedy-drama "Silver Skies." According to the official synopsis, "'Silver Skies' chronicles a group of seniors whose lives are turned upside down when their cozy Los Angeles apartment complex is threatened to be sold out from underneath them." The film, which features acting veteran George Hamilton, Valerie Perrine and Barbara Bain, will have its U.S. premiere at the Woodstock Film Festival on Saturday, October 3.   Watch the charming clip above.  Read More: 16th Woodstock Film Festival Reveals Full Slate, Including Centerpiece 'The Walk'
See full article at Indiewire »
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