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25 films all but guaranteed to cheer you up

Joe Richards Mar 24, 2017

Need to find a bit of movie happiness? Here are 25 films that might just do the trick...

Let's face it, we could all probably do with a little bit of cheering up right about now. Times are scary and times are tough, so it's perfectly natural to look for some kind of reassurance that everything will indeed be all right in the end.

Film is perhaps one of the most powerful and effective tools in doing this. It can be a transportative experience, an escape from reality, and, most importantly, it can act as a reminder of all that is good in the world.

With that in mind, here’s a list of 25 movies that are almost-guaranteed to make you smile and restore your faith in humanity...

City Lights

In truth, any of Charlie Chaplin’s films are perfect for those times when you just need to smile.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Oscars: Young Actors Glow With Complex Performances

Oscars: Young Actors Glow With Complex Performances
Producers of the Oscar telecast always try to trim the running time, so the last thing they want is another award category. But the films of 2016 have offered some remarkable work, so this might be the perfect year to revive a long-dormant Academy Awards tradition: A special Oscar to young actors.

There are a flood of knockout performances by actors playing characters of high-school age or younger. Viggo Mortensen has rightly received a lot of attention for “Captain Fantastic,” but how about those kids? George MacKay is terrific in a complex role as the oldest, teenage son. And the five actors who play his younger siblings each create a distinct character and manage to work well as an ensemble.

Other standout performances: Lucas Hedges, “Manchester by the Sea”; John-Paul Howard, as Chris Pine’s son in “Hell or High Water”; and Jovan Adepo, who holds his own with a powerhouse cast in “Fences.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Critic's Appraisal: 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' a Screen Masterpiece

Critic's Appraisal: 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' a Screen Masterpiece
In 1997, Movieline magazine hosted a 35th anniversary screening of To Kill a Mockingbird, with an amazing array of talent there to discuss the film: actors Gregory Peck, Robert Duvall, Brock Peters, Phillip Alford and Mary Badham (the latter two of whom played the children, Jem and Scout), screenwriter Horton Foote, producer Alan J. Pakula and director Robert Mulligan. One person missing from that reunion was the reclusive author of the novel, Harper Lee, who died Friday at the age of 89. Lee came back into the news last year with the publication of an earlier version of Mockingbird, Go

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Today in Movie Culture: Shia Labeouf's New Art Project, Deadpool's New Sidekick and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Performance Art of the Day: Watch Shia Labeouf's latest performance art project, #Elevate, live while it's happening. Or skim through the video, in which he hangs out in an elevator in Oxford for 24 hours, when it's done.   Superhero Movie Parody of the Day: Watch James Corden pitch various Deadpool sidekick ideas to Ryan Reynolds on The Late Late Show:   Movie Comparisons of the Day: Couch Tomato presents all the reasons that all comic book origin movies are the same:   Vintage Image of the Day: Harper Lee, who has passed away at age 89, with young Mary Badham on the set of To Kill a Mockingbird in 1962:   Oscar...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Harper Lee: ‘Mockingbird’ Actors, Writers Mourn ‘One of America’s Most Beloved Authors’

Harper Lee: ‘Mockingbird’ Actors, Writers Mourn ‘One of America’s Most Beloved Authors’
Hollywood is mourning the loss of Harper Lee, who died on Friday in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala. She was 89. The legendary author of “To Kill a Mockingbird” was remembered by the stars of the classic 1962 film adaptation of her bestselling novel, as well as other actors, screenwriters and authors.

Robert Duvall, who played the mysterious Boo Radley in “To Kill a Mockingbird” — his bigscreen debut — praised the late author’s body of work in a statement.

Harper Lee was a fine person and a wonderful writer,” he said. “‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was a masterpiece. I was privileged to be in the film version adapted to the screen by her good friend Horton Foote. I only hope that the film did justice to the book. She will be fondly remembered by many.”

Mary Badham, the actress who played Scout, Atticus Finch’s (played by Gregory Peck) daughter in the film,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Harper Lee, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Author, Dies at 89

Harper Lee, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Author, Dies at 89
Harper Lee, author of the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird,” one of the greatest literary successes of the last century and the basis for a classic 1962 film of the same name, has died, the city clerk’s office in her hometown of Monroeville confirmed. She was 89.

To Kill a Mockingbird” (1960), the story of Atticus Finch, a lawyer in an Alabama town in the 1930s who defends a black man accused of killing a white man, and his daughter Scout Finch, won the Pulitzer Prize and has sold 30 million copies and been translated into 40 languages. It has never been out of print since its initial publication.

Claudia Durst Johnson’s critical study “To Kill a Mockingbird: Threatening Boundaries” quotes a study that found that “To Kill a Mockingbird” “has been consistently one of the ten most frequently required books in secondary schools since its publication in 1960” — this despite the numerous efforts,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Mockingbird' Film’s Scout on Atticus Finch: "He’s About Justice"

'Mockingbird' Film’s Scout on Atticus Finch:
In 1962, Mary Badham was a nine-year-old girl plucked from among 200 contenders by Universal Studios to star as Scout opposite Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch in the film adaptation of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Mockingbird would go on to earn eight Oscar nominations, including best picture (it lost to Lawrence of Arabia), best actor for Peck, who won, and best supporting actress for Badham (she lost to 16-year-old Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker). “When the film came out in 1962, I got an Oscar nomination,” says Badham today. “I don’t think my brother

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

The Definitive Scary Scenes from Non-Horror Movies: 30-21

30. No Country for Old Men (2007)

Scene: Coin Flip

Video: http://youtu.be/0iAezyDzj0M

There was a brief period of time from 2006-2009 when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences made some more daring, but wholly deserved choices for Best Picture. It began in 2006, when Martin Scorsese finally won for The Departed which, while not his best and not nearly as dark as, say, Taxi Driver or Raging Bull, still leaned that direction. Three years later, they handed the Oscar to The Hurt Locker over the blockbuster Avatar, rewarding quality over audience love. But in between the two it was given to No Country for Old Men, an incredibly dark neo-Western based on the Cormac McCarthy novel of the same name. It’s still one of the Coen Brothers’ best films, an incredible cat-and-mouse journey through West Texas in the 1980′s. The film stars Josh Brolin, Tommy Lee Jones,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Rosemary Murphy, 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Actress, Dies At 89

To Kill a Mockingbird actress Rosemary Murphy died on Saturday in New York City. She was 89.

Rosemary Murphy Dies

Murphy had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer and passed away in her Upper East Side apartment, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

In the 1962 film adaptation of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird, Murphy played neighbor Maudie Atkinson, better known as Miss Maudie. Her character lives across the street from lawyer Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck) and his two young children – Scout (Mary Badham) and Jem (Phillip Alford) in the fictional Maycomb, Alabama.

Prior to appearing in To Kill a Mockingbird, Murphy appeared in a number of TV series, including Robert Montgomery Presents, Thriller, Naked City, Wide Country and The Doctors and the Nurses. Following her turn in the Oscar-nominated picture, Murphy continued her TV work.

Murphy earned her first Emmy for playing Sara Delano Roosevelt in 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin.
See full article at Uinterview »

It’s About the Message: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Socially Aware Films

Many moviegoers consider the world of film as a reprieve from their current existing realities. This is rather interesting because in looking to escape the everyday realities for a fantasized slice of reality in cinema might seem quite redundant for some folks. However, the realities that are portrayed on the big screen are varied so whatever life experiences are depicted we may not have quite lived that particular episode therefore making it intriguing and fresh for our entertaining curiosities.

Films, when capturing a fragrance of reality through triumph and tragedy, are usually armed with a special messaging about the human condition through sacrifice, self-discovery, suffering and of course social awareness. In It’s About the Message: The Top 10 Oscar-winning Socially Aware Films we will take a look at Academy Award-winning movies that dared to examine the spirit about being socially aware–through inspiration and insidiousness (or both simultaneously)–and put
See full article at SoundOnSight »

One of Earliest Surviving Academy Award Nominees in Acting Categories Dead at 88

Joan Lorring, 1945 Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee, dead at 88: One of the earliest surviving Academy Award nominees in the acting categories, Lorring was best known for holding her own against Bette Davis in ‘The Corn Is Green’ (photo: Joan Lorring in ‘Three Strangers’) Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee Joan Lorring, who stole the 1945 film version of The Corn Is Green from none other than Warner Bros. reigning queen Bette Davis, died Friday, May 30, 2014, in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow. So far, online obits haven’t mentioned the cause of death. Lorring, one of the earliest surviving Oscar nominees in the acting categories, was 88. Directed by Irving Rapper, who had also handled one of Bette Davis’ biggest hits, the 1942 sudsy soap opera Now, Voyager, Warners’ The Corn Is Green was a decent if uninspired film version of Emlyn Williams’ semi-autobiographical 1938 hit play about an English schoolteacher,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mary ‘Scout’ Badham to Attend St. Louis-area Screening of To Kill A Mockingbird May 15th

“One time Atticus said you never really knew a man until you stood in his shoes and walked around in them; just standin’ on the Radley porch was enough. The summer that had begun so long ago had ended, and another summer had taken its place, and a fall, and Boo Radley had come out.”

The Wildey Theater in Edwardsville, Il (just outside St. Louis) will be hosting two screenings of the beloved, Oscar-winning 1963 classic To Kill A Mockingbird on Thursday May 15th at 3pm and at 7pm. They’re calling the event Memories of Mockingbird: An Evening with “Scout”.

Mary Badham, the actress who played Scout in the film will be attendance to answer questions and sign autographs. Guests will hear Badham’s perspective on the impact of this important film and have an opportunity to meet and get a “Selfie with Scout.” Ms Badham was just ten years
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

My Favorite Coming of Age Movies – Part 2

Part 1 – Part 2

After staring at my movie collection trying to come up with an article idea (secrets revealed), I noticed a lot of coming of age stories. Growing up in a 90 minutes or so movie is no easy feat and these movies often deal with confusing, heartbreaking and even exhilarating time in our lives. They make sense of all the motions of a kid, show guidance in one form or another; they depict turning points in our lives that are all too common and relatable.

The spring is here folks, it’s time to get outside on your bikes, head to summer camp, make new friends, find trouble, get out of a pickle or steal a first kiss. But if you’re like me and have grown up into a life of responsibilities, there’s always nostalgia.

Here is part 2 of My Favorite Coming of Age Movies, tell me yours
See full article at City of Films »

The Oscars' youngest winners and nominees: Where are they now?

The Oscars' youngest winners and nominees: Where are they now?
There's just days to go before Ellen DeGeneres hosts the biggest event in the movie world's calendar - the 86th annual Academy Awards.

This year's nominees include newcomers Lupita Nyong'o and Barkhad Abdi, who are recognised for their supporting breakthrough performances in 12 Years a Slave and Captain Phillips respectively.

Ahead of Sunday's (March 2) glittering ceremony at Hollywood's Kodak Theater, we reminisce upon other breakthrough roles from some of the youngest Oscar-nominated stars in history - and what they've gone on to do since - below:

Tatum O'Neal in Paper Moon

Tatum O'Neal became the youngest Oscar winner in history, picking up the Best Supporting Actress trophy at the tender age of 10 for her role as strong-willed tomboy Addie in Paper Moon (1973), in which she appeared opposite her father Ryan O'Neal.

The actress went on to appear in successful movies such as The Bad News Bears Nickelodeon with Burt Reynolds, and
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

DiCaprio, Breslin and Foster: Breakthrough Oscars stars then and now

DiCaprio, Breslin and Foster: Breakthrough Oscars stars then and now
There's just days to go before Ellen DeGeneres hosts the biggest event in the movie world's calendar - the 86th annual Academy Awards.

This year's nominees include newcomers Lupita Nyong'o and Barkhad Abdi, who are recognised for their supporting breakthrough performances in 12 Years a Slave and Captain Phillips respectively.

Ahead of Sunday's (March 2) glittering ceremony at Hollywood's Kodak Theater, we reminisce upon other breakthrough roles from some of the youngest Oscar-nominated stars in history - and what they've gone on to do since - below:

Tatum O'Neal in Paper Moon

Tatum O'Neal became the youngest Oscar winner in history, picking up the Best Supporting Actress trophy at the tender age of 10 for her role as strong-willed tomboy Addie in Paper Moon (1973), in which she appeared opposite her father Ryan O'Neal.

The actress went on to appear in successful movies such as The Bad News Bears Nickelodeon with Burt Reynolds, and
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Oscars: The Seven Youngest Academy Award Nominees Ever

Oscars: The Seven Youngest Academy Award Nominees Ever
By Beckett Mufson

If Quvenzhané Wallis wins at this year's Oscars, she will be the youngest Academy Award winner ever, aside from Shirley Temple, who won a non-competitive award in 1935. If Wallis doesn't win, she will still be among the elite dramatic forces of small children who are good at pretending to be other small children, which is a respectable accomplishment. Each of these starlets earned a permanent place in the day care of cinema history, and are the standard that child actors everywhere are measured against.

Here they are the best of the youngest and the youngest of the best the Academy has ever seen.

Justin Henry, 8 years-old, for "Kramer vs. Kramer"

Justin Henry is the leader of this prestigious bunch because of his Best Supporting Actor nod for playing Billy Kramer in "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979). His childlike honesty and earnestness are the heart and soul of the film,
See full article at MTV Movies Blog »

The Top 10 Oscar-Nominated Performances By Pre-teens

By Joey Magidson

Film Contributor

***

As 2012 was wrapping up, I took a look at some of the older members of the industry that were top-tier contenders for citation by the Academy. Today I’m back with the other side of the coin: A list of the top 10 performances by pre-teens that Oscar wound up nominating. Unlike the subjects of that older piece (no pun intended), they didn’t have much experience, but like many of those highlighted in the aforementioned article, they still managed to capture the hearts of many voters.

It’s much harder for younger contenders to get noticed than their older counterparts. Academy members seem to loathe nominating pre-teens unless the work is a real standout and they’re head-over-heels for the film of which the performance is a part. They also prefer to sort of ghettoize younger candidates into the Supporting categories as opposed to the Lead ones,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

John Ostrander: In Its Time, In Our Time

  • Comicmix
It starts with notes on a piano, played in the upper register, sounding like a child’s piano. We focus in on an old cigar box as a child’s voice, a girl, hums tunelessly as small hands open the box, revealing what looks like junk but is a child’s hidden treasures. The hands explore what is there, picking out a dark crayon and rubbing across a piece of paper. Letters emerge giving us the title of the film as the main theme returns, first with flute and harp and then a full orchestra. It’s a waltz, elegiac and slightly sad, evoking times past.

So begins To Kill A Mockingbird, Robert Mulligan’s 1962 film based on Harper Lee’s 1960 novel. Set in rural Alabama during the 1930s and the depths of the Depression, the story is told from the viewpoint of young Scout Finch, includes her brother Jem,
See full article at Comicmix »
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