John Badham - News Poster

News

Blu-ray Review – A Fistful of Dollars (1964)

A Fistful of Dollars, 1964.

Directed by Sergio Leone.

Starring: Clint Eastwood, Marianne Koch, Gian Maria Volonte, Wolfgang, Lukschy, Sieghardt Rupp, and Joseph Egger.

Synopsis:

If you’re a fan of director Sergio Leone’s “man with no name” trilogy of spaghetti westerns, you’ll want to snap up this new edition of A Fistful of Dollars. In addition to a new 4K restoration of the print, it offers a copious amount of new bonus features, including a new commentary track (in addition to the existing one), new interviews, and more.

It’s common knowledge that filmmaker Akira Kurosawa was a huge influence on George Lucas when he made Star Wars. The Japanese director’s samurai films helped give Lucas’s Jedi Knights a mystical element that they would have lacked had they been based solely on the knights of Arthurian legends.

However, it’s not as well known, at least among casual film fans,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘WarGames’ Composer Arthur B. Rubinstein Dies at 80

‘WarGames’ Composer Arthur B. Rubinstein Dies at 80
Arthur B. Rubinstein, composer for films such as “War Games” who worked on more than 300 films and television programs, died April 23 of complications resulting from cancer. He was 80.

In the 1960s, Rubinstein composed incidental music for around 50 productions while serving as composer-in-residence for the American Conservatory Theater, the Williamstown Theater Festival, and the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. He continued on in the 1970s serving as a music director, both in Los Angeles and on Broadway, for shows such as “A Chorus Line,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” and “Evita.” Rubinstein received an L.A. Drama Critics Circle Award for his work as music director on Gordon Davidson’s production of “A Little Night Music.”

After moving to Los Angeles, Rubinstein composed scores for films such as “WarGames” (1983) starring Matthew Broderick, and Albert Brooks’ “Lost in America” (1985). Rubinstein earned an Emmy Award for his original music on CBS series “Scarecrow and Mrs. King.” He also scored “Shooting War,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82

Edward Abroms, the film editor who worked with a young Steven Spielberg on Night Gallery and The Sugarland Express and received an Oscar nomination for cutting John Badham's Blue Thunder, has died. He was 82.

Abroms died Tuesday of heart failure in Los Angeles, daughter Lynn Abroms told The Hollywood Reporter. He was the recipient of the American Cinema Editors' Career Achievement Award in 2006.

As a film editor and director on the long-running NBC hit Columbo, Abroms won the second of his two career Emmy Awards for cutting an episode in 1972. He landed a second nom that year...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82
Edward Abroms, the film editor who worked with a young Steven Spielberg on Night Gallery and The Sugarland Express and received an Oscar nomination for cutting John Badham's Blue Thunder, has died. He was 82.

Abroms died Tuesday of heart failure in Los Angeles, daughter Lynn Abroms told The Hollywood Reporter. He was the recipient of the American Cinema Editors' Career Achievement Award in 2006.

As a film editor and director on the long-running NBC hit Columbo, Abroms won the second of his two career Emmy Awards for cutting an episode in 1972. He landed a second nom that year...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Stayin’ Alive: 40 Years of Saturday Night Fever

  • Cineplex
Stayin’ Alive: 40 Years of Saturday Night FeverStayin’ Alive: 40 Years of Saturday Night FeverKurt Anthony12/15/2017 10:31:00 Am

Whether you’re a brother or whether you’re a mother, everybody knows Saturday Night Fever!

Strutting into theatres on December 16, 1977, the iconic disco drama celebrates its 40th anniversary today and we’ve got boogie fever!

Directed by John Badham (Dracula, WarGames), Saturday Night Fever was inspired by a New York Magazine article titled “Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night” and went on to become a massive box office success. Shot on a modest budget of $3M, the film has since earned over $237M worldwide!

Starring John Travolta as the groove-shakin’ Tony Manero, Saturday Night Fever served as a breakout role for the talented triple-threat and even earned him a Best Actor nomination at the 1978 Academy Awards.

Of course, there wouldn’t be much dancing without music! One of the best-selling soundtracks of all time,
See full article at Cineplex »

‘#WarGames’ Trailer: 1980s Nuclear War Thriller is Reborn As An Interactive Television Series

‘#WarGames’ Trailer: 1980s Nuclear War Thriller is Reborn As An Interactive Television Series
John Badham’s 1983 thriller film “WarGames” is getting a 21st century reboot courtesy of MGM and entertainment company Eko. The film has been reimagined as an interactive television series, similar to what Steven Soderbergh and HBO have done with “Mosaic,” in which viewers are able to shape the story by choosing which direction the narrative takes.

Read More:‘Mosaic’ First Trailer: Steven Soderbergh’s Murder Mystery is an Interactive App and an HBO Limited Series

The interactive television series is entitled “#WarGames”and is created by video game designer Sam Barlow, best known for his work on the “Silent Hill” franchise. The original “War Games” starred Matthew Broderick as a young hacker who gains access to a United States military supercomputer programmed to predict possible outcomes of nuclear war.

“With ‘#WarGames,’ I was thrilled to take the questions raised by the original movie and ask them again in a world
See full article at Indiewire »

The fascinating prescience of Tomorrow Never Dies

Mark Allison Dec 12, 2017

It's 20 years today that Tomorrow Never DIes first landed in UK cinemas. But was it, in its own way, ahead of its time?

Imagine a world in which deceitful news reporters and mysterious computer hackers are conspiring to destabilise the geopolitical status quo. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom has developed delusions of grandeur about its place in the world, and begun to embark upon an effort to restore itself to former imperial greatness. All this might seem a little familiar to anyone who has glanced at a newspaper recently, but it’s not a summary of recent events – this is a synopsis for the seventeenth James Bond film, Roger Spottiswoode’s Tomorrow Never Dies, which has just turned 20 years old.

See related Riverdale season 2 episode 7 review: Tales From The Darkside Riverdale season 2 episode 6 review: Death Proof Riverdale season 2 episode 5 review: When A Stranger Calls

Described by this website
See full article at Den of Geek »

Robert Getchell, 'Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore' Screenwriter, Dies at 81

Robert Getchell, who received Oscar nominations for his screenplays for Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and Bound for Glory, has died. He was 81.

Getchell died Oct. 21, according to a funeral home in Monterey, California. No other details of his death were available.

Getchell also co-wrote Mommie Dearest (1981), starring Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford, and John Badham’s Point of No Return (1993), and he did adapted screenplays for Stella (1990), starring Bette Midler; This Boy's Life (1993), starring Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio; and John Grisham's The Client (1994), directed by Joel Schumacher.

Getchell’s first screenplay...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Robert Getchell, 'Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore' Screenwriter, Dies at 81

Robert Getchell, who received Oscar nominations for his screenplays for Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and Bound for Glory, has died. He was 81.

Getchell died Oct. 21, according to a funeral home in Monterey, California. No other details of his death were available.

Getchell also co-wrote Mommie Dearest (1981), starring Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford, and John Badham’s Point of No Return (1993), and he did adapted screenplays for Stella (1990), starring Bette Midler; This Boy's Life (1993), starring Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio; and John Grisham's The Client (1994), directed by Joel Schumacher.

Getchell’s first screenplay...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

S. Craig Zahler interview: Brawl In Cell Block 99, Bone Tomahawk

Simon Brew Oct 20, 2017

Writer/director S. Craig Zahler talks to us about his films, his approach, and Ridley Scott adapting his work…

I loved Brawl In Cell Block 99, the second feature film from novelist and filmmaker S. Craig Zahler. His first? Bone Tomahawk. I love that too, for the record. Zahler already feels like a very different voice in American film, a man content for his budgets to be low and control over his material to be high.

See related Star Trek: Discovery episode 1 review - The Vulcan Hello Star Trek: Discovery episode 2 review - Battle At The Binary Star Star Trek: Discovery episode 3 review - Context Is For Kings

He spared me some time for a chat to talk about the film, his approach, and what he feels about Drew Goddard and Ridley Scott adapting one of his books.

I came out of the movie being glad that
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Jupiter’s Moon’ Tops Spain’s Sitges Festival

‘Jupiter’s Moon’ Tops Spain’s Sitges Festival
Barcelona — Cannes competition entry “Jupiter’s Moon,” directed by Kornél Mundruczó, took best picture and F/X awards at Sitges’ 50th International Fantastic Film Festival of Catalonia, which wraps Saturday.

Awarded titles suggest a balance between the author-driven, arthouse genre with supernatural elements – such as The Match Factory’s “Jupiter’s Moon,” an existential supernatural thriller with black comedy touches exploring immigrant crisis, terrorism, and the West’s loss of values – and features closely linked to more traditional genres and sub-genres like revenge thrillers and horror Westerns. Notably, two main category awards went to movies directed or co-directed by women. French-Brazilian “As Boas Maneiras” directed by Jualiana Rojas and Marco Dutra won the Critics Award.

Sold by Paris’ Charades and premiering at Toronto’s Midnight Madness, Coralie Fargeat’s feature debut’s “Revenge,” a stylish rape-revenge horror thriller, took best director Fargeat snagged the Citizen Kane Award for an up-and-coming director.

A disturbing
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution
In the 1970s and early ’80s, New York City embodied the revolution taking place in American cinema. It was brash and brutal, crude and powerful, sexy and grimey, and had a swagger that was unmistakable.

It was also a low point for the city. The Bronx was burning, crime was rising and city hall was broke. But even as respectable folks fled for the safety of the suburbs, New York became a canvas for talented filmmakers. From “The French Connection” to “Saturday Night Fever,” it posed as the setting of classic films that ushered in a new era of on-screen realism. It was the age of De Niro and Pacino, Scorsese and Lumet, talents who upended the sterile and factory-like approach to making movies that dominated the studio system.

It’s a revolution in filmmaking that’s over. Just as Times Square, the setting of “Taxi Driver,” has been replaced by a fantasyland for tourists, movies
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Vancouver Film: "Skyscraper", "Siren", "Colony"

  • SneakPeek
From VancouverFilm.Net, here is the Vancouver Film Production Update for October 2017 including "Skyscraper", "Siren", "Colony" and a whole lot more:

Features:

A Dogs Way Home

Local Production Company: Singularity Productions

Director: Charles Martin Smith

Producer: Gavin Polone

Oct 16/17 - Dec 15/17

Eggplant Emoji

Local Production Company: Eggplant Productions

Director: Jake Szymanski

Producer: Ross Dinerstein

Aug 21/17 - Oct 05/17

Elsewhere

Local Production Company: Elsewhere Productions

Director: Hernan Jimenez Garcia

Sep 11/17 - Oct 11/17

Nicole

Local Production Company: True Meaning Productions

Director: Marc Lawrence

Oct 23/17 - Jan 19/18

Skyscraper

Local Production Company: Main Mast Production - Can, Inc

Director: Rawson Marshall Thurter

Aug 14/17 - Nov 17/17

Untitled Robert Zemeckis Project

Local Production Company: Stiletto Cinema Partners

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Producer: Robert Zemeckis, Cherylanne Martin

Aug 11/17 - Oct 19/17

TV Series:

A Series Of Unfortunate Events ~ Season 2

Local Production Company: Olaf II Productions Inc

Director: Loni Peristere, Allan Arkush

Apr 17/17 - Apr 20/18

Arrow - Season 6

Local Production Company:
See full article at SneakPeek »

Whoopi Goldberg, Larry Karaszewski Elected to Academy’s Board of Governors

Whoopi Goldberg, Larry Karaszewski Elected to Academy’s Board of Governors
Actress/host Whoopi Goldberg, writer Larry Karaszewski and director Kimberly Peirce have been elected to the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Academy announced on Thursday. They are among the 10 members elected to the board for the first time. An additional six incumbents retained their seats, while Visual Effects Branch governor Richard Edlund was returned to the board after a hiatus. Goldberg beat Geena Davis, Edward James Olmos and Rita Wilson for a seat vacated by Annette Bening from the Academy’s Actors Branch. Peirce beat John Badham, Kasi Lemmons and Donald M.
See full article at The Wrap »

Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 1970s in Polish Posters

Above: Polish poster for Escape from New York (John Carpenter, USA, 1981). Designer: Wieslaw Walkuski.For three weeks in July, New York’s Film Forum is running a stellar series of more than 40 1970s New York-set films. As soon as I heard about the program I wanted to do a poster article on it, given that the 1970s was a heyday for American poster design. However, when I started to look at the posters I realized that many of them were so well known that rehashing their posters wasn’t that interesting. But in my search I started to notice how many of the films had Polish counterparts. It is interesting that so many of these American productions were released in Poland and it may have had a lot to do with the counter-cultural, anti-establishment bent of most of the films.While poster design in the U.S. had moved quite decisively from illustration to photography-based in the late 60s, Polish poster art was still mostly drawn and painted in the 1970s. There are a couple of exceptions here but the photos are collaged or posterized in a way that is quite different from the way they would be used in the U.S. Another interesting note is that very few of the posters make use of New York signifiers, with the obvious exception of the Statue of Liberty for Escape from New York, and a silhouetted skyline for Manhattan (notably the two films with the most New York-specific titles). Otherwise the posters seen here are typically idiosyncratic, eccentric, beautiful, alluring, occasionally baffling and, with the possible exception of Serpico, always strikingly unlike their American counterparts. This selection also feels like a tour of great Polish poster art in the 70s, with most of the major artists represented: Jakub Erol, Wiktor Gorka, Eryk Lipinski, Andrzej Klimowski, Jan Mlodozeniec, Andrzej Pagowski, Waldemar Swierzy, Wieslaw Walkuski and more. It seems as if every major designer got a crack at at least one of these challenging, thrilling films.Above: Polish poster for Manhattan (Woody Allen, USA, 1979). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, USA, 1976). Designer: Wiktor Gorka.Above: Polish poster for All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, USA, 1979). Designer: Leszek Drzewinski.Above: Polish poster for Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, USA, 1975). Designer: J. Czerniawski.Above: Polish poster for The Hospital (Arthur Hiller, USA, 1971). Designer: Marcin Mroszczak.Above: Polish poster for Diary of a Mad Housewife (Frank Perry, USA, 1970). Designer: Eryk Lipinski.Above: Polish poster for Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, USA, 1976). Designer: Andrzej Klimowski.Above: Polish poster for Klute (Alan J. Pakula, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.Above: Polish poster for Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, USA, 1977). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for The French Connection (William Friedkin, USA, 1971). Designer: Andrzej Krajewski.Above: Polish poster for Serpico (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1973). Designer: Jakub Erol.Above: Polish poster for The Panic in Needle Park (Jerry Schatzberg, USA, 1971). Designer: Tomas Ruminski.Above: Polish poster for Midnight Cowboy (John Schlesinger, USA, 1969). Designer: Waldemar Swierzy.Above: Polish poster for The Anderson Tapes (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.See New York in the 70s at Film Forum from July 5 to 27.Posters courtesy of Heritage Auctions.
See full article at MUBI »

Lord and Miller: 12 other directors who left/got fired from movies during production

Luke Owen looks at directors who left/got fired from movies during production…

With the shocking news that Phil Lord and Chris Miller have vacated the director’s chairs for the yet-to-be-titled Han Solo movie over “creative differences” (some sources say they were forced out), I thought it was time to look at some other directors who faced similar issues.

It’s no secret that making a tentpole movie for a studio is tricky. Duncan Jones has been very vocal as of late about the issues he had with last year’s Warcraft, and it was rumoured a few years ago that Gareth Edwards faced an uphill battle with Warner Bros. and Legendary on 2014’s Godzilla reboot. The 1993 Super Mario Bros. movie had its script re-written the weekend before production started with no input from the directors, who were then locked out of the editing room during post-production (they were eventually let back in).

Most of the time directors leave before production actually starts, and someone new is brought in. Edgar Wright left Ant-Man, Patty Jenkins left Thor: The Dark World, Rick Famuyiwa and Seth Grahame-Smith both left The Flash, Ben Affleck stepped down from The Batman, Stephen Herrick left Lara Croft: Tomb Raider; the list goes on. But very rarely does a director leave (or get fired) while the movie is in production. Usually if a studio loses faith in the director at that point, they would bring in someone else to “oversee” the movie and get it over the finish line. The aforementioned Godzilla saw this very occurrence, as did Mission: Impossible II when the legendary Stuart Baird was brought in to “fix” the movie Jon Woo originally helmed. Baird in fact has a long history with this, being a fixer on titles such as Superman: The Motion Picture, The Omen and Lethal Weapon.

There are still four or so weeks left on the Han Solo movie (plus the already planned reshoots), so let’s look back at a few other directors who left/got fired from their films.

The Wizard of Oz, 1939

It seems crazy to think that one of the most beloved movies of all-time had such a tumultuous production, but The Wizard of Oz in fact saw six different directors helm the movie. Norman Taurog originally shot test footage, but was quickly replaced with Richard Thorpe who shot for around two weeks when Taurog was moved to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Producer Mervyn LeRoy felt that Thorpe was rushing the production, and his short time on the film was probably not helped when original Tin Man Buddy Epsen was hospitalised after the metal make-up coated his lungs and left him on an Iron Lung.

None of Thorpe’s footage made it into the final cut (although he did shoot Dorothy’s first meeting Scarecrow and several scenes at The Wicked Witch’s castle), and George Cucker came in after Thorpe was fired. However, Cucker didn’t actually shoot any footage, and was there to simply oversee the plans to re-shoot all of Thorpe’s work until Victor Fleming came in. Although he was eventually the only credited director, Fleming left before production ended to film Gone with the Wind, and the shooting was finished by King Vidor and LeRoy.

Gone with the Wind, 1939

Speaking of Gone with the Wind, George Cucker had been developing the movie with producer David O. Selznick for around two years, but was removed from the project three weeks into production. According to reports, the decision to remove Cucker was Clark Gable’s and it angered fellow co-stars Vivien Leigh and Olivia de Havilland who went to Selznick’s office to demand he be re-hired. In Cucker’s place was Victor Fleming, who shot the majority of the movie over ninety-three days (although Cucker was secretly coaching Leigh and Havilland behind the scenes). Fleming wasn’t the final name on the movie however, as he had to take a short break due to exhaustion and Sam Wood shot for around twenty-three days.

Spartacus, 1960

Although considered a Stanley Kubrick movie, he wasn’t the first name attached to Spartacus. After David Lean turned down the movie, it was offered to Anthony Mann who was then fired by star Kirk Douglas after just one week of production. According to Douglas in his autobiography, Mann was “scared” of the size and scope of Spartacus and wasn’t capable of finishing the film.

Superman II, 1980

Shooting for Superman II was done alongside Superman: The Motion Picture in 1977 with Richard Donner doing both films. However the film was under a lot of pressure, with overrunning schedules and budget, which producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind and Pierre Spengler attributed to Donner. After everything was shot for Superman: The Motion Picture, Superman II was placed on hiatus. Once Superman: The Motion Picture was an instant hit, the producers brought in Richard Lester to replace Donner on Superman II and shoot around the footage already filmed. Why Lester replaced Donner is still up for debate. Spengler has claimed that Donner was asked to come back but refused, while Donner claims he only found out Superman II was getting underway when he received a fax from the Salkinds telling him his services weren’t required.

The cast and crew did not take the replacement lightly, with creative consultants Tom Mankiewicz and editor Stuart Baird refusing to return for the sequel, along with Gene Hackman who was replaced with a body double. Although Marlon Brando had already shot everything for both movies, he successfully sued the Salkinds who then cut him out of the sequel. Years later, Warner Bros. released the Richard Donner cut of Superman II on home video as Superman II: The Donner Cut.

Piranha II: The Spawning, 1981

Piranha II was originally set to be directed by Roger Corman graduate Miller Drake, who envisioned a version of the movie which saw the return of Kevin McCarthy (who died in the original film). Drake was then replaced with James Cameron who was working on the film’s special effects department, and he then re-wrote the script under the pseudonym H.A. Milton. However around two weeks into production, Cameron was fired by producer Ovidio G. Assonitis who felt he wasn’t doing a good enough job. Assonitis wouldn’t let Cameron review any of the footage he’d shot during his time on the movie, and was even making all of the day-to-day decisions.

A regularly reported story was that Cameron broke into the editing room while the producers were in Cannes to cut his version of the movie, which was then re-cut by Assonitis. “Then the producer wouldn’t take my name off the picture because [contractually] they couldn’t deliver it with an Italian name,” Cameron said in a 1991 La Times interview. “So they left me on, no matter what I did. I had no legal power to influence him from Pomona, California, where I was sleeping on a friend’s couch. I didn’t even know an attorney. In actual fact, I did some directing on the film, but I don’t feel it was my first movie.”

WarGames, 1983

WarGames began life as a very different movie titled The Genius in 1979 about a much older gentlemen, but this changed when writers Walter F. Parkes and Lawrence Lasker discovered a large youth-movement in the computer world, who would later be known as hackers. The character of David Lightman (played by Matthew Broderick) was even modeled after hacking enthusiast David Scott Lewis.

When the film went into production it was being helmed by Martin Brest who was then removed from the movie 12-days into shooting after a disagreement with the producers. In his place was John Badham, whose first act was to lighten the tone of the movie. “[Brest had] taken a somewhat dark approach to the story, and saw Matthew’s character as someone who was rebelling against his parents, and who was just kind of stewing inside,” he told The Hollywood Interview in 2009. “There was that tone to it. I said ‘If I was 16 and could get on a computer and change my grades or my girlfriend’s grades, I would be peeing in my pants with excitement!’ And the way it was shot, it was like they were doing some Nazi undercover thing. So it was my job to make it seem like they were having fun, and that it was exciting, but it wasn’t this dark rebellion.”
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ted Sarandos Snubbed by Academy and More Details From the Board of Governors Candidates

Earlier today, the Academy sent an email to all members with the final list of Board of Governors candidates. Conspicuously absent is Netflix CEO and Ted Sarandos, who hosted a recent Academy museum fundraiser and was hoping to get a chance to run for the board.

Also absent is Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the current president of AMPAS, who’s stepping down this August and not seeking a third three-year term on the 54-member board. You have to be on the board in order to run for President. Others no longer in the running are Sony Pictures Classics and CBS Films executives Michael Barker and Terry Press, producer Paula Wagner, director Brett Ratner and actors Queen Latifah and Lou Diamond Phillips. Actress Laura Dern is one current board member who is backed by Academy CEO Dawn Hudson and gaining support.

The final election begins Monday, June 19 and closes on Friday, June
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Ted Sarandos Snubbed by Academy and More Details From the Board of Governors Candidates

Earlier today, the Academy sent an email to all members with the final list of Board of Governors candidates. Conspicuously absent is Netflix CEO and Ted Sarandos, who hosted a recent Academy museum fundraiser and was hoping to get a chance to run for the board.

Also absent is Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the current president of AMPAS, who’s stepping down this August and not seeking a third three-year term on the 54-member board. You have to be on the board in order to run for President. Others no longer in the running are Sony Pictures Classics and CBS Films executives Michael Barker and Terry Press, producer Paula Wagner, director Brett Ratner and actors Queen Latifah and Lou Diamond Phillips. Actress Laura Dern is one current board member who is backed by Academy CEO Dawn Hudson and gaining support.

The final election begins Monday, June 19 and closes on Friday, June
See full article at Indiewire »

John Badham interview: Saturday Night Fever at 40

Don Kaye May 15, 2017

Director John Badman looks back at his disco classic four decades later...

Saturday Night Fever is the film that made John Travolta into a legitimate star, launched the Bee Gees to the pinnacle of pop success and introduced the world to the subculture, music and fashion of disco dancing - specifically the scene in the clubs of the insular blue collar Brooklyn neighbourhood of Bay Ridge. The movie made the scene and music into a national phenomenon that lasted several years, until the disco craze petered out in the early '80s.

See related  Better Call Saul season 3 episode 1 review: Mabel Better Call Saul season 2 episode 10 review: Klick Better Call Saul season 2 episode 9 review: Nailed Better Call Saul season 2 episode 8 review: Fifi

The whole thing was based on a New York magazine article called 'Tribal Rites Of The New Saturday Night', written by a British journalist named
See full article at Den of Geek »

Saturday Night Fever Dances Back Into Theaters May 7th & May 10th

“You make it with some of these chicks, they think you gotta dance with them.”

In 1977, Saturday Night Fever became a cultural touchestone like few movies before or since, and this May fans can catch the fever again when the influential classic returns to the big screen for two days only in celebration of its 40th anniversary.

Director John Badham worked with Paramount Pictures to restore the film using the original negative and update the surround sound mix to further enhance viewers’ enjoyment of the incredible soundtrack. During this process he added scenes to the theatrical R-rated version that round out character and plot, making this new Director’s Cut the definitive representation of his original vision.

Fathom Events and Paramount Pictures will present the brand-new Director’s Cut of Saturday Night Fever in cinemas nationwide on Sunday, May 7 and Wednesday, May 10, at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites