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The Simpsons Just Set Another All-Time TV Record

Fox’s staple animated comedy series The Simpsons has broken yet another record, taking the title of most episodes produced for a prime time scripted TV show from the classic Western drama series Gunsmoke. The cartoon celebrated with an opening parody in which Maggie has a showdown with Gunsmoke‘s hero Marshal Matt Dillon (who was played by the late James Arness in the TV series). Maggie gets the draw on Dillon, and The Simpsons takes the record.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Hangover Square

No, it’s not a the-day-after sequel to The Lost Weekend, but a class-act mystery-horror from 20th-Fox, at a time when the studio wasn’t keen on scare shows. John Brahm directs the ill-fated Laird Cregar as a mad musician . . . or, at least a musician driven mad by a perfidious femme fatale, Darryl Zanuck’s top glamour girl Linda Darnell.

Hangover Square

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1945 /B&W / 1:37 Academy / 77 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Laird Cregar, Linda Darnell, George Sanders, Faye Marlowe, Glenn Langan, Alan Napier.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Harry Reynolds

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Barré Lyndon

Produced by Robert Bassler

Directed by John Brahm

Here’s a serious quality upgrade for horror fans. Although technically a period murder thriller, as a horror film John Brahm’s tense Hangover Square betters its precursor The Lodger in almost every department. We don
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Thing's missing blow-up doll and other deleted scenes

Ryan Lambie Nov 9, 2017

Character deaths, screwdrivers and blow-up dolls: John Carpenter’s The Thing had some fasinating scenes cut before release...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Thing.

See related The Twilight Zone: reboot in the works with Jordan Peele 31 scary TV episodes that truly terrified us Top 50 terrifying TV characters

Critically mauled on release and largely overlooked in cinemas, John Carpenter’s The Thing has only grown in stature since 1982. What were once condemned as deficiencies - its graphic gore and violence, icy tone and low-key characterisation - are now generally regarded as positives. Its simple story about a group of scientists and misfits who encounter a shape-shifting alien in their Antarctic outpost, The Thing has aged remarkably well for a 35-year-old film: Rob Bottin’s practical effects are still extraordinarily imaginative, and fans still debate the finer points of its action today. Who sabotaged the fridge full of blood samples?
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ben Bates Dies: ‘Gunsmoke’ Stunt Double was 84

Stunt double Ben Bates, best known for his work substituting for Gunsmoke star James Arness for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, California, according to his family. He was 84. Bates’s long career included doubling spots for the television series How the West Was Won (for which he was also a stunt coordinator), McClain’s Law, Bosom Buddies, The Fall Guy and Matt Houston. He also appeared in the film The Legend of the Lone Ranger and the TV movies The Alamo: Thi…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84
Ben Bates, who served as the stunt double for James Arness, the star of Gunsmoke, for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, Calif., his family announced. He was 84.

In addition to stepping in for Arness as Marshal Matt Dillon on the long-running CBS Western, Bates doubled for the actor on the TV series McClain's Law and How the West Was Won (on which Bates also served as stunt coordinator) and in the TV movies Red River and The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory.

In 2001's James Arness: An Autobiography, Bates said that each...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84

Ben Bates, who served as the stunt double for James Arness, the star of Gunsmoke, for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, Calif., his family announced. He was 84.

In addition to stepping in for Arness as Marshal Matt Dillon on the long-running CBS Western, Bates doubled for the actor on the TV series McClain's Law and How the West Was Won (on which Bates also served as stunt coordinator) and in the TV movies Red River and The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory.

In 2001's James Arness: An Autobiography, Bates said that each...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Giant Insects Attack Coachella in Insane Dead Ant Trailer

  • MovieWeb
Giant Insects Attack Coachella in Insane Dead Ant Trailer
The trailer for Dead Ant is here and it looks like a classic monster movie mixed with Spinal Tap. The movie is a comic reimagining of the sci-fi classic of Them!. The B-movie vibe is laid on extra thick in the new trailer that features Sean Astin tripping out on Peyote and Tom Arnold pulling out a gun to shoot a giant ant after explaining that he carries the gun because he's in the music business. If that doesn't make you want to watch the movie, who knows what will. The impressive cast looks like they had a blast making Dead Ant and the soundtrack is stuffed with fake 80s metal adding to the fun.

The story starts when the "one-hit-wonder" glam-metal band "Sonic Grave" embark on a trip to Coachella in hopes of a comeback, but end up in No-Chella since their manager couldn't book them for the official
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Sea Chase

John Wayne plays a German sea captain in a film that goes out of its way to create a favorable image of our former enemy, with hardly a Nazi flag or even a German accent in sight. Wayne and his co-star Lana Turner are as Teutonic as Blondie and Dagwood, yet the film works as a basic adventure – we like the charismatic star, and the sea chase format guarantees extra interest.

The Sea Chase

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 117 min. / Street Date July 11, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: John Wayne, Lana Turner, David Farrar, Lyle Bettger, Tab Hunter, James Arness, Richard Davalos, John Qualen, Paul Fix, Alan Hale Jr., Peter Whitney, Claude Akins, John Doucette, Tudor Owen, Adam Williams.

Cinematography: William Clothier

Film Editors: William Ziegler, Owen Marks

Original Music: Roy Webb

Written by James Warner Bellah, John Twist from a novel by Andrew Geer

Produced and Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The 10 Manliest Male Characters on TV Right Now

Since television began, America has had a love affair with manly men on the small screen. In the early days, most of them were cowboys like Chuck Connors in “The Rifleman” and James Arness in “Gunsmoke”. Now we’ve evolved quite a bit and our favorite manly men often wear suits and even eyeglasses like Tom, Kiefer, and Michael. But, more about them later. Ok, let’s face it, many of us still love seeing a manly man shirtless, like Justin Hartley who never seems to get a single role that doesn’t write him into the script as shirtless in multiple scenes,

The 10 Manliest Male Characters on TV Right Now
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Battleground

Battleground

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1949 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 118 min. / Street Date January 10, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Van Johnson, John Hodiak, Ricardo Montalban, George Murphy, Marshall Thompson, Don Taylor, James Whitmore, Douglas Fowley, Leon Ames, Guy Anderson, Denise Darcel, Richard Jaeckel, James Arness

Cinematography: Paul Vogel

Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters

Film Editor: John D. Dunning

Original Music: Lennie Hayton

Written by: Robert Pirosh

Produced by: Dore Schary

Directed by William A. Wellman

“The Guts, Gags and Glory of a Lot of Wonderful Guys!”

— say, what kind of movie is this, anyway?

Action movies about combat are now mostly about soldiers that fight like killing machines, or stories of battle with a strong political axe to grind. WW2 changed perceptions completely, when a mostly civilian army did the fighting. With the cessation of hostilities combat pictures tapered off quickly, and Hollywood gave the subject a break for several years.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Gun The Man Down" (1956) Starring James Arness And Angie Dickinson; Blu-ray Release From Olive Films

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

"Gun the Man Down" is yet another Poverty Row low-budget Western shot during an era in which seemingly every other feature film released was a horse opera. Supposedly shot in nine days, the film is primarily notable for being the big screen directing debut of Andrew V. McLaglen, who would go on to be a very respected director who specialized in Westerns and action films. The movie also marked the final feature film for James Arness before he took on the role of Marshall Matt Dillon in TV's long-running and iconic "Gunsmoke" series. After failing to achieve stardom on the big screen, Arness found fame and fortune in "Gunsmoke" when John Wayne recommended him for the part. Wayne had been championing Arness for years and provided him with roles in some of his films. Following "Gunsmoke"'s phenomenal run, Arness seemed content to stay with TV and had another successful series,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Gun the Man Down

This almost completely forgotten '50s western couldn't compete with the big productions, but it has a good cast -- James Arness, Robert J. Wilke, Emile Meyer, Harry Carey Jr. Plus early work by writer Burt Kennedy, and the debuts of actress Angie Dickinson and director Andrew V. McLaglen. Gun the Man Down Blu-ray Olive Films 1956 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 76 min. / Street Date July 19, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 Starring James Arness, Angie Dickinson, Emile Meyer, Robert J. Wilke, Harry Carey Jr., Don Megowan, Michael Emmet, Pedro Gonzalez Gonzalez. Cinematography William H. Clothier Film Editor A. Edward Sutherland Original Music Henry Vars Written by Burt Kennedy, Sam Freedle Produced by Robert E. Morrison Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

When the 1950s rolled in John Wayne stopped being merely an actor and graduated to institution status, starting his own production company, Batjac, and promoting his own group of talent.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Sci-fi Weekend, Ahrya Fine Art, Los Angeles, April 15-17

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

The Ahrya Fine Arts Theater in Los Angeles will be presenting a fun-filled weekend of six science fiction classics from Friday, April 15th to Sunday, April 17th. Several cast members from the films are scheduled to appear in person at respective screenings, so read on for more information:

From the press release:

Anniversary Classics Sci-Fi Weekend

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: www.laemmle.com/ac.

Re-visit the Golden Age of the Science Fiction Film as Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series presents Sci-fi Weekend, a festival of six classic films April 15-17 at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Beverly Hills.

It was dawn of the Atomic Age and the Cold War, as Communist and nuclear war paranoia swept onto the nation’s movie screens to both terrify and entertain the American public. All the favorite icons are here: Robby the Robot from Forbidden Planet,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Creature From The Black Lagoon: the unmade Carpenter film

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Universal's classic monster movie Creature From The Black Lagoon was almost remade by John Carpenter in the 1990s. So what happened?

It's one of the great suspense scenes in 50s genre cinema: a woman swims in the clear cool water of an Amazonian lagoon, blissfully unaware of the grotesque creature emerging from the depths beneath her. The score builds to a crescendo as the monster closes in, reaching out with a clawed, webbed hand...

Director Jack Arnold directed some of the best American sci-fi movies of the post-wwii era, and Creature From The Black Lagoon is perhaps his most famous. About a team of scientists investigating the fossilised remains of a strange man-fish hybrid - and discovering the thing still very much alive in the depths of the Amazon - the movie was a sizeable hit for Universal when it came out in early 1954.

The cultural impact
See full article at Den of Geek »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Thing

  • Cinelinx
Continuing our series on Hollywood remakes, this week’s film is one of those lauded remakes that many say is better than the original. While a horror movie may not be in the Christmas spirit, this film does have a lot of snow in it. This week, Cinelinx looks at John Carpenter’s The Thing.

When people talk about remakes of old films, the one that is most often mentioned as being better than the original is John Carpenter’s 1982 horror flick, The Thing, which is a remake of the 1951 Howard Hawks classic The Thing From Another World. There’s a good argument to be made for the newer one. Not that the first one isn’t an excellent movie, but this is a rare occasion where the reputation of the remake seems to overshadow the original.

Both films were based on the short story “Who Goes There?” by John W.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Warners’ Special Effects Blu-ray Collection

I'll trade you two RKOs for two Warners', an even swap! This quartet of movie-magic wonderments offer a full course on old-school film effects wizardry at its best. Willis O'Brien passes the baton to disciple Ray Harryhausen, who dazzles us with his own effects magic for the first '50s giant monster epic. And the best monster thriller of the decade is offered at its original widescreen aspect ratio. It's all special enough to merit a mid-week review. Special Effects Collection Blu-ray The Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Them! Warner Home Video 1933-1954 / B&W / 1:37 Academy - 1:85 widescreen / 335 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / 54.96 or 19.98 separately Starring Robert Armstrong, Helen Mack,, Frank Reicher, Victor Wong; Robert Armstrong, Terry Moore, Ben Johnson, Frank McHugh; Paul Christian, Paula Raymond, Cecil Kellaway, Kenneth Tobey, Donald Woods, Lee Van Cleef; James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon, James Arness, Onslow Stevens,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Human vs. Alien Films: The Must-Sees

Humankind’s collision with otherworldly life forms can make for unforgettable cinema.

This article will highlight the best of live-action human vs. alien films. The creatures may be from other planets or may be non-demonic entities from other dimensions.

Excluded from consideration were giant monster films as the diakaiju genre would make a great subject for separate articles.

Readers looking for “friendly alien” films such as The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), It Came from Outer Space (1953) and the comically overrated Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) are advised to keep watching the skies because they won’t find them here.

Film writing being the game of knowledge filtered through personal taste that it is, some readers’ subgenre favorites might not have made the list such as War of the Worlds (1953) and 20 Million Miles to Earth (1957).

Now let’s take a chronological look at the cinema’s best battles between Us and Them.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Godzilla, Giant Ants, and Other Monsters - and Mickey Rooney: May '14 at LoC's Packard

Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, Giant Ants, Fascists, and rarely seen ‘Musty Stuffer’: Eclectic Packard Theater movies in May 2014 (photo: ‘Godzilla’) Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, military fascists, deadly giant ants, racing car drivers, and The Mishaps of Musty Suffer, a super-rare slapstick comedy series from the 1910s, are a few of the highlights at the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater in May 2014. Godzilla 1954 and fellow movie monsters Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla 2014, starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Juliette Binoche, Ken Watanabe, and Bryan Cranston, opens on May 16 in much of the world. On May 8 at the Packard Theater, you’ll get the chance to check out Ishiro Honda’s Godzilla 1954 aka Gojira — in the original, Toho-released, Japanese-language version (i.e., without Raymond Burr). As part of its Godzilla double bill, the Packard Theater will also present Motoyoshi Oda’s Gigantis, the Fire Monster aka Godzilla Raids Again (1955). Besides Godzilla, the Packard Theater will
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Examining the critical reaction to The Thing

Ryan Lambie Jun 26, 2017

35 years ago, The Thing was panned by critics. We take a look at the angry reaction and its modern status as a horror classic...

It's the summer of 1982, and director John Carpenter is on the cusp of releasing his latest movie, The Thing. For the 34-year-old filmmaker, the release marks the end of a major undertaking: the culmination of months of shooting on freezing cold sets and snowy British Columbia locations, not to mention the execution of complex and time-consuming practical effects scenes.

See related Twin Peaks season 3 episode 7 review: There’s A Body All Right Twin Peaks season 3 episode 6 review: Don’t Die Twin Peaks season 3 episode 5 review: Case Files

Carpenter was understandably proud of the results: after such independent hits as Assault On Precinct 13, Halloween and Escape From New York, this was his first studio movie (for Universal) and also his most expensive to date,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Examining the critical reaction to The Thing

Feature Ryan Lambie 20 Jan 2014 - 06:27

John Carpenter's The Thing was panned by reviewers in 1982. We take a look at the angry critical reaction and the later reassessment...

It's the summer of 1982, and director John Carpenter is on the cusp of releasing his latest movie, The Thing. For the 34-year-old filmmaker, the release marks the end of a major undertaking: the culmination of months of shooting on freezing cold sets and snowy British Columbia locations, not to mention the execution of complex and time-consuming practical effects scenes.

Carpenter was understandably proud of the results: after the independent such independent hits as Assault On Precinct 13, Halloween and Escape From New York, this was his first studio movie (for Universal) and also his most expensive to date, with a budget of around $15m. And while The Thing had appeared in cinemas before (in the guise of Howard Hawks and Christian Nyby's 1951 sci-fi shocker,
See full article at Den of Geek »
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