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‘Book Club’: How Robert Redford’s Former Producers Made the Rare Rom-Com About Women Over 65

‘Book Club’: How Robert Redford’s Former Producers Made the Rare Rom-Com About Women Over 65
Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

There are four leading ladies in Bill Holderman’s directorial debut, “Book Club,” and each of them get equal time to explore burgeoning new romances that light up their individual lives (and that are further enlivened by the introduction of E.L. James’ steamy “Fifty Shades of Grey” trilogy to the eponymous book club). It’s cute idea, but it’s also one that’s quietly revelatory: each of the film’s stars is over the age of 65. Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen, Candice Bergen, and Diane Keaton all play long-time best pals trying to squeeze some life out of their waning years. The lesson, of course, is that they’ve gotten plenty more to do, no matter the number of candles on their birthday cake.

Romantic comedies have sputtered out in the studio world over the past
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Book Club’

Film Review: ‘Book Club’
Aside from its being a shameless plug for the “50 Shades” books, there’s nary a surprise in store with “Book Club,” the kind of comfort-food movie that’s been pre-masticated by committee to the consistency of pudding (with even less flavor). Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, and Mary Steenburgen are the clan of readers whose latest selection stirs dormant libidos, albeit so vaguely that viewers needn’t fear that any actual sex surfaces in this prudishly snickering sex comedy.

Though the four leading ladies have compiled a large body of memorable screen moments between them, the appeal of familiar favorites in an even milder retread through “The First Wives Club” terrain will inevitably appeal to underserved older demographics. But really, it’s sad that the best Hollywood can come up with for so much seasoned talent is this stale shake-and-bake combining upscale-lifestyle porn with some tepid smirky humor.

It
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Topher Grace: ‘I Had Enough Money’ From ‘That ’70s Show’ to Stop Making Studio Films and Start Working With Auteurs

Topher Grace: ‘I Had Enough Money’ From ‘That ’70s Show’ to Stop Making Studio Films and Start Working With Auteurs
You wouldn’t expect former sitcom star Topher Grace to be one of the faces of American cinema at the world’s most prestigious film festival, but such is the case at Cannes this year. The actor appears in the only two U.S. films competing for the Palme d’Or, Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” and David Robert Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake,” but coming to Cannes for the first time with two high profile movies is no accident on his part. As Grace told IndieWire’s Eric Kohn at Cannes during a conversation at the American Pavilion, working with auteurs like Lee and Mitchell has become his golden rule when signing on to projects.

“You see a film like ‘It Follows’ and you say to yourself, ‘I’ll do anything to work like an auteur like this,'” Grace said. “The same thing is true with Spike. For me,
See full article at Indiewire »

Margot Kidder’s 6 Best Non-‘Superman’ Roles, From ‘Amityville Horror’ to ‘Some Kind of Hero’ (Photos)

Margot Kidder’s 6 Best Non-‘Superman’ Roles, From ‘Amityville Horror’ to ‘Some Kind of Hero’ (Photos)
Margot Kidder was one of the first leading ladies of the superhero genre. As Lois Lane in the “Superman” movies opposite Christopher Reeve, Kidder proved she was doing more than just playing a sidekick or a damsel in distress. She was ballsier, saltier and wittier than even some of her male co-stars, and she deserves to be in the conversation with female franchise stars like Carrie Fisher or Karen Allen. But she had a lucrative career outside of playing Lois Lane, including starring opposite Richard Pryor, Rod Steiger, Burt Lancaster, Howie Mandel and more. Here are some of those other unsung great roles.

Sisters” (1972)

In Brian de Palma’s grizzly mystery film, Kidder plays a young model caught up in a murder case, but (Spoiler) she also plays the model’s twin sister who stabs her recent bedfellow and attempts to cover up the murder with the help of her
See full article at The Wrap »

“Can You Read My Mind?” Margot Kidder (1948-2018)

Superman was faster than a speeding bullet, could leap tall buildings in a single bound and if pushed, could even make the earth spin in the wrong direction, but when it came to falling in love, he was as open and vulnerable as the rest of us. When Superman arrived in cinemas in 1978, we believed a man could fly®. Thanks to Margot Kidder and Christopher Reeve, we believed he could fall in love too.

Kidder was an unconventional but perfect choice. The more traditionally beautiful Anne Archer was all set to play Lois Lane, but something about Kidder swayed director Richard Donner’s mind. “She was charming and very funny. When I met her in the casting office, she tripped coming in and I just fell in love with her.”

Lois’s first meeting with her becaped intended, caught in mid-air after falling from a helicopter is one of the
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Margot Kidder, Superman's Lois Lane, dies aged 69

Canadian-born actor, who secured screen stardom via blockbusting comic book adaptation, experienced long-term mental health issues

Margot Kidder – a life in pictures

Margot Kidder, whose best known role was as reporter Lois Lane in the 1978 Superman movie has died aged 69. The Franzen Davies funeral home in Montana confirmed her death on Sunday.

Kidder was born in Canada in 1948, and broke into film acting in the late 60s. Her first significant role was in the Gene Wilder comedy Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx in 1970. Brian DePalma cast her as conjoined twins in the cult horror Sisters (1973) before she graduated to a major Hollywood production opposite Robert Redford in The Great Waldo Pepper in 1975.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hollywood Mourns 'Superman' Actress Margot Kidder

Hollywood Mourns 'Superman' Actress Margot Kidder
Hollywood stars took to social media on Monday to pay tribute to Margot Kidder, the film and television actress best known for playing Lois Lane in 1978’s Superman. Kidder died at the age of 69 on Sunday, according to the Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Montana.

In addition to her starring role in Superman, she also starred alongside Robert Redford in The Great Waldo Pepper and Richard Pryor in Some Kind of Hero.

A number of stars took to social media to pay tribute to the late actress. Kumail Nanjiani reflected on her film Black Christmas, while Mark...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Margot Kidder, Lois Lane of 'Superman' Films, Dead at 69

Margot Kidder, Lois Lane of 'Superman' Films, Dead at 69
Margot Kidder, the actress who helped immortalize Lois Lane in the 'Superman' series, has died at age 69. Kobal/Rex Shutterstock

Margot Kidder, the actress who portrayed Lois Lane in four Superman films, died Sunday at her home in Livingston, Montana at the age of 69.

The Franzen-Davis Funeral Home & Crematory first announced Kidder's death, which was later confirmed to the Hollywood Reporter by the actress' representative. No cause of death was provided.

During the Seventies and Eighties, Kidder's most prolific decades, the actress starred in films like Brian De Palma's Sisters,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Superman Actress Margot Kidder Has Passed Away

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in director Richard Donner's classic Superman movie and its sequels, has passed away. She was 69-years-old. For those of you who didn't know, the actress suffered from mental illness in her later years after she had a nervous breakdown. 

According to the Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Mt, she died on Sunday but they didn't share any details on the cause of death.

Kidder had a very long and successful 50-year career and on top of the Superman films, most people know her from The Amityville Horror, the horror film Black Christmas, and The Great Waldo Pepper opposite Robert Redford. She also starred alongside Gene Wilder in Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx.

In 2015, she won an Emmy Award for her performance on the children's television series R.L. Stine's The Haunting Hour. According to IMDb, one
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Why ‘Be Natural’, The Documentary About The First Female Director, May Be The Best (And Least-Seen) Film In Cannes

I have seen the most pertinent, timely, touching and inspiring movie in Cannes this year, and for my money the best in the fest. So why do I feel hardly anyone saw it, even if among its executive producers are Robert Redford, Hugh Hefner and John Ptak, and features a who’s who of on-camera participants? So why is no one talking about it? Try to find a review of it in the trades or anywhere and you will have to search hard. Those critics apparently would rather rush to see…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Margot Kidder, ‘Superman’ Actress, Dies at 69

Margot Kidder, ‘Superman’ Actress, Dies at 69
Margot Kidder, the actress best known for playing Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in the “Superman” films, has died. She was 69.

The actress died in her sleep at her home on Sunday in Livingston, Mont., her publicist Camilla Fluxman Pines confirmed to Variety.

Born Oct. 17, 1948, in Canada, Kidder got her start in low-budget Canadian films and TV shows before landing a role in 1970’s “Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx” opposite Gene Wilder. She later appeared in 1973’s “Sisters,” “The Great Waldo Pepper” with Robert Redford, and 1979’s “The Amityville Horror.”

She rose to prominence as Lois Lane, the award-winning Daily Planet journalist and Clark Kent’s love interest in all four “Superman” films from 1978 to 1987.

Kidder, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, suffered some career setbacks after a public nervous breakdown in 1996. She continued acting in smaller roles on TV series including “Smallville,” “Brothers & Sisters,” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margot Kidder Dies: ‘Superman’s Lois Lane & ‘Amityville Horror’ Star Was 69

Margot Kidder, who is probably best known for portraying Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in the 1970s and ’80s Superman movies and starred in many other films including The Amityville Horror while struggling with mental illness, has died. She was 69. The Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Mt, said she died Sunday but did not reveal a cause of death. Kidder appeared with many of Hollywood’s leading men during her 50-year career, including Robert Redford and…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Margot Kidder Dies: ‘Superman’s Lois Lane & ‘Amityville Horror’ Star Was 69

Margot Kidder Dies: ‘Superman’s Lois Lane & ‘Amityville Horror’ Star Was 69
Margot Kidder, who played Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in the 1970s and ’80s Superman movies and starred in many other films including The Amityville Horror before struggling with mental illness in her later years, has died. She was 69. The Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT, said she died Sunday but did not give a cause of death.

Kidder appeared with many of Hollywood’s leading men during her 50-year career, including Robert Redford and James Garner
See full article at Deadline TV »

Margot Kidder, ‘Superman’ Actress, Dies at 69

Margot Kidder, ‘Superman’ Actress, Dies at 69
Margot Kidder, who rose to prominence playing Lois Lane in the 1978 film “Superman” opposite Christopher Reeve, died Sunday, according to an obituary published by the Franzen-Davis funeral home. She was 69.

According to the obituary, Kidder died at her home. Arrangements are pending under the care of Franzen-Davis Funeral Home and Crematory in Livingston, Montana.

Kidder’s manager, Camilla Fluxman Pines, told TheWrap on Monday that the actress died peacefully in her sleep.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

Born in Canada in 1948, Kidder appeared in a number of low-budget Canadian films and TV shows, and appeared in films including the 1973 thriller “Sisters,” the Robert Redford-drama “The Great Waldo Pepper” and the 1979 horror film “The Amityville Horror,” as well as “Superman” and its sequels.

Kidder’s career and personal life suffered setbacks in the 1990s, following a nervous breakdown. She disappeared for four days in 1996, and later told People,
See full article at The Wrap »

'Superman' Star Margot Kidder Dies at 69

'Superman' Star Margot Kidder Dies at 69
Margot Kidder, the film and television actress perhaps best known for her role as Lois Lane in 1978's Superman, has died, her rep, Camilla Fluxman Pines, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. She was 69. 

The actress died Sunday, according to the Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Montana. No cause of death was disclosed. 

Kidder, known for playing Lois Lane in Superman I-iv, also starred opposite leading men including Robert Redford in The Great Waldo Pepper and Richard Pryor in Some Kind of Hero. She even appeared on the Superman-inspired TV series Smallville in 2004 (though as another character). 

DC Comics' official Twitter...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Timothy Olyphant in Talks to Star in Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Movie

Timothy Olyphant in Talks to Star in Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Movie
Timothy Olyphant is in negotiations to star in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” a drama set against the backdrop of the Manson Family murders.

The mystery-shrouded project has not yet gone into production. At Sony Pictures’ CinemaCon presentation on April 23, Tarantino said leading actors Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt will be “the most exciting dynamic star duo since Paul Newman and Robert Redford.”

The director also said the film will be the most similar in style and plotting to his iconic “Pulp Fiction,” for which he and Roger Avary won the Academy Award for original screenplay in 1995.

“It takes place at the height of the counterculture explosion,” said Tarantino. “It takes place at the time of the hippie revolution, and it takes place at the height of new Hollywood.”

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” hits theaters on Aug. 9, 2019 — the 50th anniversary of the murders of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Timothy Olyphant Eyes Lead Role in Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Timothy Olyphant Eyes Lead Role in Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
With production slated to begin this summer on Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, the director has added yet another cast member with Timothy Olyphant in talks to join the drama. No details about the character have been released, including if he's playing someone real or fictional. Perhaps we'll find out more when cameras start rolling in Los Angeles this summer. The actor's schedule had to be reworked around his hit Netflix series The Santa Clarita Diet, but those issues have been sorted out and negotiations are under way.

If a deal is finalized, Olyphant will join a cast that includes Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, the recently-confirmed Margot Robbie, Kurt Russell, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Zoe Bell and the most recent casting addition, Burt Reynolds. The story was originally said to revolve around the Sharon Tate murders in 1969, perpetrated by members of the Manson Family, but it
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Book Club’ Team Bill Holderman & Erin Simms Ink With Wme

Exclusive: Bill Holderman and Erin Simms, who collaborated on Paramount’s upcoming Book Club starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen, have signed with Wme. Holderman directed the comedy and co-wrote the script with Simms, and both produced the pic that hits theaters May 18. The pair previously worked together at Robert Redford’s Wildwood Entertprises, where they teamed on 2015’s A Walk in the Woods, which Holderman wrote and produced, and…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Arctic review – Mads Mikkelsen lends sizzling machismo to icy survival tale

Joe Penna’s debut about a pilot stranded in the wilderness is a gripping ordeal with a yowlingly intense turn from its star

Here is a gripping and efficient addition to the rugged survivalist thriller genre, a realm where men are men and howling lamentations at the unforgiving sky is seen as entirely acceptable behaviour. It’s directed by Joe Penna, a first-time film-maker from Brazil formerly known for his YouTube persona, MysteryGuitarMan. His debut feature owes a fair bit both to Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours and the Robert Redford lost-at-sea drama All Is Lost, but it’s tidily put together and boasts a terrific, ruddy-cheeked performance from Mads Mikkelsen.

Mikkelsen’s character is listed in the credits as Overgård, but that’s pretty much all we ever learn about him. We do know he is a pilot of some sort, though it’s clear when we first encounter him
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Arctic': Film Review | Cannes 2018

'Arctic': Film Review | Cannes 2018
A plane crashes in remote snowbound wilderness and two strangers, a man and a woman, struggle to survive, their only comfort being that they are not alone. That might sound like last year's The Mountain Between Us, in which biting cold and chapped lips were the only factors restraining the contrived romantic melodrama. But Arctic, for all intents and purposes, is a solo show whose direct precursor is J.C. Chandor's 2013 Robert Redford vehicle, All is Lost. Joe Penna's endurance challenge takes place on land, not at sea, but it's similarly stripped down, relying on minimal dialogue and no obvious allegorical...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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