Terrence Malick - News Poster

News

‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away

As a film critic and as a maker of documentaries about filmmakers, Kent Jones has steeped himself in the best of world cinema and remained engaged with it for years, and so the surprise of his first narrative feature as a writer-director, “Diane,” is that there is barely a trace of influence from other films or other directors.

“Diane” is a character study about an older woman played by Mary Kay Place, and it is an unusual, elusive, windblown sort of movie, always twisting and turning and moving in different directions. Whenever “Diane” seems to settle down for a moment to let us comprehend something about the lives of its characters, it jumps ahead or sideways or away from us; as in life, our understanding of what is happening and what it means keeps shifting. The tone here is elevated and a bit difficult sometimes, but the end point of all this difficulty is transcendent, and then something beyond even transcendence.

Place’s Diane is first seen asleep in a hospital room, with her dying cousin Donna (Deirdre O’Connell, “The Path”) watching over her. Diane is there to help Donna die, basically, but it is Donna who is there at the beginning to bless Diane with some attention, and that reversal is typical of this movie. Diane is shown as a conscientious woman who is always making lists and visiting her friends and family, most of whom are physically ill in some way; she is barely ever seen at home. We never do find out what she once did for a living, and we only hear about her deceased husband in passing.

Watch Video: Watch 'Westworld' Panel at Tribeca Film Festival Awkwardly End Right After Cringeworthy Fan Question

But we learn a great deal about Diane’s tortured relationship with her son Brian (Jake Lacy), who is a drug addict. At first, it appears as if the very selfish Brian never looks outside of himself and that Diane spends a somewhat inordinate amount of time helping others, and “Diane” seems to be getting at a difficult subject here.

There have been many movies about having detestable parents, but comparatively few films about having a detestable child. In many ways, having a detestable child is a far worse fate, because it’s relatively easy to reject hateful parents and almost impossible to reject a hateful child. But this is actually not what “Diane” is ultimately interested in.

When Diane goes to see some elderly family members and friends all huddled around a table in a kitchen, we can feel just how much comfort she takes in their presence because Jones switches to a much faster editing style with quick cuts that makes for a contrast to the scenes of Diane by herself, which begin to rely on dissolves to show how she is losing her grip on her life.

Also Read: Tribeca Film Festival Announces Full Slate, Nearly Half Directed by Women

Place has often been cast as a best-friend character on TV and in movies, and Diane is a best-friend type, on the surface. But as this movie goes on, we begin to realize that Diane hasn’t always been like this. “Diane” is a very insightful film about old age because it acknowledges how many different people a person can be throughout a long lifetime, and it’s a lucky person who isn’t ashamed of some of those younger variants of themselves.

This movie changes somewhat drastically when we see Diane go to a bar to get drunk because her awful son has gone missing. With a few drinks in her, we see a different Diane, an earlier version who liked a good time and wasn’t as hard on herself. She starts to dance by the jukebox, but then her drunken high spirits crash down low as we see her sitting at a table while the 1991 hit “I’m Too Sexy” plays, a piece of pop detritus that incongruously bobs back to the surface.

Will Diane ever hear that song again, or think of it? Will we? There’s a randomness to that silly old song coming on that points up the deliberate untidiness of this movie, its refusal to look away from moments that might not have any meaning.

Also Read: Teen Vogue Reporter: 'I Was Groped 22 Times' at Coachella While Covering Sexual Harassment

Though she has obviously had a lot of drinks, Diane’s voice sounds clear and calm as she asks for another, but the waitress thinks she has had enough, and she is basically told to leave the bar. “I remember you, Diane,” the bartender tells her. In that one line, we can hear a reaction to this other person Diane used to be, and we can sense that maybe she wasn’t too unlike her own son when she was younger.

There comes a point when Jones does briefly quote another director here. Diane starts keeping a journal, and there’s a section of this movie where we see what look to be her favorite moments from her past. These short shots are clearly an homage to the fleet-footed visual style of Terrence Malick, a filmmaker that Jones has praised in the past. But Jones ultimately has a far tougher point of view than Malick. The thing that’s so unsettling, finally, about “Diane” is that it stresses the formlessness of life.

Diane’s brown hair goes white. We hear her voice on the soundtrack, and she is wondering if she left the stove on, and if she took a pill she needed to take. If we get to be old, we are probably not going to be thinking about the best sex we ever had, or a poem we loved. When we are old and still clinging to life, our thoughts can rest on the small things that suddenly seem so important, like if we left the stove on, or if we took our pills.

“Diane” is not easy to take sometimes, but it never lies, and the performances from all the actors here tell the truth, too. Jones has always been unusually attentive as a critic when it comes to how much acting can affect or influence a movie, and so “Diane” is about many things, but it is also a movie about Mary Kay Place and her “Are you kidding me?” facial expression and what caused that expression.

This is a movie that notices things and people that we are trained to ignore, and you are not likely to forget it, even as the life of its heroine finally drifts away from her like a kite lost on a winter beach.

Read original story ‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

The Best Monster Movies to Watch Instead of ‘Rampage’ — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

Last weekend saw the release of “Rampage,” which may be the highest-rated video game movie on Rotten Tomatoes, but probably won’t go down in history as the king of monster movies.

This week’s question: What monster movie should people watch instead of “Rampage?”

Matt Zoller Seitz (@MattZollerSeitz), RogerEbert.com

The 2014 “Godzilla,” directed by Gareth Edwards. Try to watch it on the biggest screen you can find, in a dark room. It’s the most aesthetically daring monster movie, and one of the most daring big budget Sf films, released in the last decade, owing as much to “Close Encounters” as it does to anything Toho made. I was shocked by how much money it made. It was basically a Terrence Malick Godzilla movie, right down to the cutaways to other
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2018: Here Are 12 Movies By Female Filmmakers That Could Have Been at the Festival (It’s Not Too Late)

Cannes 2018: Here Are 12 Movies By Female Filmmakers That Could Have Been at the Festival (It’s Not Too Late)
As has become commonplace for the annual event, the Cannes Film Festival’s competition slate continues to be dominated by male directors. Announced yesterday, the 2018 competition lineup includes the highest number of films from female filmmakers since 2011, and the festival will play home to new works from Nadine Labaki, Eva Husson, and Alice Rohrwacher. At the festival’s announcement press conference, artistic director Thierry Frémaux hinted that another work from a woman could be added to the lineup in the coming days.

In years past, Frémaux has blamed the lack of female directors on the Cannes slate on the discrepancy between how many male and female directors are working today, and yet Cannes has often programmed and championed a number of the film world’s best female filmmakers. The lack of many of them from this year’s lineup is jarring — though, to be fair, this year’s lineup is
See full article at Indiewire »

Lars von Trier Won’t Return to Cannes (Yet), But Here’s the Story Behind His 2011 Banishment

While the Cannes Film Festival will not include five Netflix films, there was another notable omission when the festival unveiled its 2018 slate: Bad boy Danish auteur Lars von Trier will not return to the Competition with his latest “dark and sinister” film “The House that Jack Built” (IFC Films), starring Riley Keough, Uma Thurman, and Matt Dillon as a serial killer who narrates the story, Ripley-style — with humor. (Trier’s 2014 feature “Nymphomaniac” played Toronto and other festivals.) Von Trier was banned from the festival seven years ago, and while Cannes has suggested that it might invite him back, so far that hasn’t happened.

It’s possible that Trier could still make his way to Cannes, as artistic director Thierry Fremaux hinted at the end of his press conference. The head programmer has reportedly been talking through this possibility with Cannes’ influential board of directors, which represents a range of major film organizations in France.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Lars von Trier Won’t Return to Cannes (Yet), But Here’s the Story Behind His 2011 Banishment

While the Cannes Film Festival will not include five Netflix films, there was another notable omission when the festival unveiled its 2018 slate: Bad boy Danish auteur Lars von Trier will not return to the Competition with his latest “dark and sinister” film “The House that Jack Built” (IFC Films), starring Riley Keough, Uma Thurman, and Matt Dillon as a serial killer who narrates the story, Ripley-style — with humor. (Trier’s 2014 feature “Nymphomaniac” played Toronto and other festivals.) Von Trier was banned from the festival seven years ago, and while Cannes has suggested that it might invite him back, so far that hasn’t happened.

It’s possible that Trier could still make his way to Cannes, as artistic director Thierry Fremaux hinted at the end of his press conference. The head programmer has reportedly been talking through this possibility with Cannes’ influential board of directors, which represents a range of major film organizations in France.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2018 Lineup Includes New Films from Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Jia Zhangke, Bi Gan, and More

With a jury headed by Cate Blanchett, the main lineup for the 71st Cannes Film Festival has been unveiled, including Competition, Un Certain Regard, Out of Competition, Midnight, and Special screenings. This year’s competition lineup features some of our most-anticipated films of the year, including Jean-Luc Godard’s Le livre d’images, Lee Chang-dong’s Burning, Jia Zhangke’s Ash is Purest White, Spike Lee’s BlackKkKlansman, Jafar Panahi’s recently unveiled Three Faces, David Robert Mitchell’s Under the Silver Lake, Pawel Pawlikowski’s Cold War, and more. The Un Certain Regard section also includes one title we hoped might make it into competition: Bi Gan’s Kaili Blues follow-up Long Day’s Journey into Night.

While it’s clear there was going to be no Netflix films, there were a handful of rumored films that didn’t make the cut, though there’s the possibility of being added later.
See full article at The Film Stage »

2018 Cannes Film Festival Lineup Announcement Live Stream — Watch

2018 Cannes Film Festival Lineup Announcement Live Stream — Watch
The Cannes Film Festival is celebrating its 71st year in 2018 with a lineup that is expected to bring directors like Terrence Malick, Lars von Trier, Claire Denis, and David Robert Mitchell back to the Croisette. Rumors have been circulating for weeks as to which films and filmmakers will be heading to Cannes 2018 next month, and the festival is set to make its 71st lineup official this morning.

The Cannes announcement live stream is set to begin at 5am Et on April 12. Cannes will be streaming the broadcast live from its YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter pages. The festival will reveal the titles playing in categories like Competition, Un Certain Regard, and Midnight Screenings.

As previously announced, Cannes will open with the world premiere of Asghar Farhadi’s Spanish-language drama “Everybody Knows,” starring Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz. You can click here for IndieWire’s Cannes 2018 wish list.

The 2018 Cannes Film Festival
See full article at Indiewire »

FilmStruck: The start of something great?

Joe Jeffreys on FilmStruck

With the meteoric rise of online streaming over the past few years, you’d be forgiven for thinking the world’s entire DVD collection now resides in the world sharpest (and shiniest) landfill. For large swathes of public, film consumption is now solely confined to the use of either Amazon or Netflix, with the occasional, terrifying expedition to a local gum depository… I mean cinema. Whilst these platforms have come leaps and bounds in the past few years – particularly in their breadth of original content – there remains a deficiency in both.

Leaving aside their nightmarish interfaces (ask yourself how much of your life is spent scrolling thought Netlix or Amazon then breath a deep sigh) both platforms suffer from strangely limited catalogues when it comes to classic, independent and foreign cinema. Amazon does give you the opportunity to rent from a large catalogue on a film-by-film basis,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Tye Sheridan Explains How Dark Phoenix Will Differ From Previous X-Men Movies

Not many actors get the opportunity to work with a true auteur behind the camera, let alone several. Tye Sheridan is a performer who’s earned his leading man status though and as such, has had the chance to collaborate with several of the industry’s best, including Jeff Nichols (Mud), Steven Spielberg (Ready Player One), and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life).

He recently reprised his role as Scott Summers for X-Men: Dark Phoenix, which completed production in Montreal late last year. The start of a new X-Men trilogy, we won’t get to see the Apocalypse follow-up until February of 2019, but that didn’t stop Cyclops himself from discussing the latest mutant blockbuster. During an interview with Collider, Sheridan disclosed how Dark Phoenix will differ from previous X-Men films, saying:

“Everyone was on the same page with the idea that we were approaching it as much more of
See full article at We Got This Covered »

50 Years Later, the World Is Finally Catching Up With ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

50 Years Later, the World Is Finally Catching Up With ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
In the 50 years since “2001: A Space Odyssey” was first released, on April 2, 1968, no movie has matched its solemnly jaw-dropping techno-poetic majesty. It’s still the grandest of all science-fiction movies, one that inspired countless adventures set in the inky vastness of deep space (notably “Star Wars”), remaking the DNA of cinema as we know it. It completed the transformation of Stanley Kubrick into “Stanley Kubrick,” and was greeted by critics with a mixture of ecstasy and derision (Pauline Kael: “a monumentally unimaginative movie”). But after its shaky original release, which resulted in Kubrick trimming 19 minutes out of it after opening weekend, “2001” was re-marketed as a psychedelic youth-generation cult film (“The Ultimate Trip”), and that’s how it finally caught on.

It remains such a staggering experience, so mind-bending and one-of-a-kind, that you’d be hard-pressed to think of a moment in the film that isn’t iconic. The awesome opening solar alignment,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Salome': Film Review

'Salome': Film Review
2011 was a breakthrough year for Jessica Chastain, in which work done over several years was finally seen by a wowed public: Features she made with directors Jeff Nichols, Terrence Malick and Ralph Fiennes premiered, as did the Hollywood adaptation of Kathryn Stockett's novel The Help. But at that year's Venice festival, the film elite got a glimpse of work she had done long before: Al Pacino's Wild Salome, a doc in the mode of his Looking for Richard, chronicled the preparations for a Los Angeles staging of Oscar Wilde's Salome in 2006, which starred a then-unknown Chastain in the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Movie Poster of the Week: Midnight Marauder’s Top 10 Favorite Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Us festival one sheet for Hal (Amy Scott, USA, 2018). Designed by Midnight Marauder.One of the best and most inventive movie poster designers currently at work, the L.A.-based artist known as Midnight Marauder should be no stranger to followers of my Movie Poster of the Day Tumblr and annual top 10 lists. A graphic designer for some 20 years, Mm a.k.a. Emmanuel, has been designing movie posters for the past five years. He has had two very fruitful collaborations in that time, first with Terrence Malick for whom he has designed a number of posters, most notably the teaser for Knight of Cups, and more recently with the great Berlin-based Italian illustrator Tony Stella with whom he has been producing beautiful alternative posters for films like The Phantom Thread. Together they also designed the poster for the 50th anniversary release of The Great Silence, which opens in theaters today.
See full article at MUBI »

Tye Sheridan Looks Back on ‘The Tree of Life’ and What He Learned From Terrence Malick at 11 Years Old

Tye Sheridan Looks Back on ‘The Tree of Life’ and What He Learned From Terrence Malick at 11 Years Old
Tye Sheridan is front and center in Steven Spielberg’s new blockbuster hopeful “Ready Player One,” but the movie is hardly the first time the young actor has worked with one of the greatest living directors in cinema. Sheridan made his feature acting debut in “The Tree of Life,” and he shot Terrence Malick’s magnum opus when he was only 11 years old. As the actor explains on Variety’s Playback Podcast, working with Malick on his first film set a very unusual precedent.

“That was my first experience ever on a film set,” Sheridan said. “The fact that I never saw a script and I didn’t know what we were shooting until literally the moment we arrived on set, for me, I thought that was normal when I was 11 years old working on this movie.”

Sheridan eventually learned on subsequent film projects like Jeff Nichols’ “Mud” and David Gordon Green
See full article at Indiewire »

Playback: Tye Sheridan on ‘Ready Player One’ and Learning From Terrence Malick

Playback: Tye Sheridan on ‘Ready Player One’ and Learning From Terrence Malick
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

The 21-year-old actor Tye Sheridan is in full gallop on a career that began 10 years ago when he was plucked from the sidelines by Terrence Malick for the 2011 film “The Tree of Life.” After finding his stride in movies like Jeff Nichols’ “Mud” and Bryan Singer’s “X-Men: Apocalypse,” Sheridan — one of Variety‘s 10 Actors to Watch in 2014 — has a pair of studio blockbusters set for 2018: “X-Men: Dark Phoenix,” in which he’ll reprise the role of Cyclops later in the fall, and Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player One,” a dream project for a young man who grew up on a steady diet of Spielberg’s spectacles in Texas.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Javier Bardem Explains Why Filming 'Thy Kingdom Come' Was One of His "Hardest Experiences"

Javier Bardem Explains Why Filming 'Thy Kingdom Come' Was One of His
The story of Thy Kingdom Come's journey to the screen is unique, to say the least. 

The project, which recently debuted at the SXSW Film Festival, is just over 40 minutes long and consists of cut footage from Terrence Malick's 2012 film To the Wonder. Malick commissioned Eugene Richards, along with actor Javier Bardem (in-character as fictional priest Father Quintana), to travel to Bartlesville, Oklahoma, for a month to speak with the locals and get their stories.

When none of the footage made it into the final product, Richards and Bardem implored Malick to grant them access to the footage, which he did, and thus...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

SXSW Review: ‘Perfect’ is a Stylish, Trippy Take on Genetic Engineering Lacking Substance

A trippy take on genetic engineering, Perfect is a mind-altering film that, depending on the viewer’s sensibilities, will either be an expressionist gem or a hollow exercise in style over substance. Taking place at what could either be a high-tech health spa or the future of the penal system, the film begins as a young man known as Vessel 13 (Garrett Wareing) is urged to this facility by his mother (Abbie Cornish). She’s been there before, opening a whole host of possibilities as liberties are taken visually and spiritually in the name of creating an origin story for Vessel 13 as mother projects her hopes and dreams onto her perfect son. Those looking for a traditional narrative ought to look elsewhere; Perfect is a gruesome, yet occasionally gorgeous high-tech take on Last Year at Marienbad with depth, I fear, that is only skin deep.

Sent to the clinic after killing a young woman,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: ‘Paul, Apostle of Christ’

Film Review: ‘Paul, Apostle of Christ’
At one point in “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” a Roman prefect (Olivier Martinez, sporting a Caesar haircut and a nearly unintelligible accent) refers to rumors that his captive, the early Christian evangelist Paul (James Faulkner), wields some kind of special power. In a world that idolizes DC and Marvel superheroes — “false gods,” in Old Testament parlance — that’s practically what it would take to get the attention of the moviegoing public these days, but alas, Paul’s power is of a less spectacular sort: He believes in the divine afterlife that awaits him following whatever martyrdom he must suffer at the hands of Roman emperor Nero, who has blamed the city’s fires on this scrappy religious cult.

Countering the CG bombast and apocalyptic doom and gloom of the modern blockbuster with a soft-spoken message of faith and love, “Paul, Apostle of Christ” struggles to find a compelling entry point
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rushes. Tilda & Joe, "Isle of Dogs" Interviews, Mr. Rogers

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSWe are ecstatic about the news of our favorite Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul's new project Memoria entering production. The latest: Tilda Swinton is aboard. The Film Stage has the report.Is the wait for Orson Welles' posthumously completed feature The Other Side of the Wind nearly over? It would seem so. Variety reports that composer Michel Legrand has joined the project to provide the score. Orson Welles for 2018 Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or!Recommended VIEWINGYou're likely aware that American cinema's most controversial stylist has a new film arriving in cinemas this week. But have you seen this completely lovely set of interviews with the films cast (and titular dogs)?William Friedkin, the iconoclastic director of The Exorcist, has a most exciting new (exorcist themed) film: the documentary The Devil & Father Amorth.In a completely different register,
See full article at MUBI »

Giveaway – Win Terrence Malick’s Badlands on Blu-ray

To celebrate the release of Badlands – available on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital HD Dual Format from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment 19th March 2018 – we are giving away a copy!

In 1959, Kit (Martin Sheen), who has killed several people, and his new girlfriend, Holly (Sissy Spacek), who watched him do it, are adrift in a double fantasy of crime and punishment across South Dakota and Montana. They’re playing make-believe, but the bullets and bloodshed are very real.

The first of writer/director Terrence Malick’s three landmark films (1978’s Days of Heaven and 1998’s The Thin Red Line are the others) was inspired by a real-life 1958 Midwestern killing spree. Malick imaginatively transforms the story into a provocative study of people alienated from everyday life – but fascinating to us. Beautifully shot and memorable acted, Badlands is a spellbinding journey.

Order today via HMV.

The competition closes at midnight on Sunday, April 1st. UK readers only please.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Is An Unconventional, Moving Terrence Malick Spin-Off Film [SXSW Review]

One of the more unexpected spin-offs in the last few years, Eugene Richards‘ “Thy Kingdom Come”, is a pseudo-documentary pieced together from excised footage of Javier Bardem’s character Father Quintana from Terrence Malick’s 2012 film, “To The Wonder.” Richards, a famous photographer in his own right, was contacted by Malick to find real people to interact with Bardem’s character.
See full article at The Playlist »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites