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Rushes. Palmes d'Or, Cannes Trailers, Detective Orson Welles

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSThis year's Cannes Film Festival has concluded, and Hirokazu Kore-eda took home the Palme d'Or for Shoplifters, while Jean-Luc Godard won a Special Palme d'Or for The Image Book—the latter of which Mubi has picked up for distribution in the UK. You can find the rest of the awards here, and our extensive coverage of the festival, including reviews and interviews, here.A most remarkable website and organization has launched: Fondation Chantal Akerman, which among many other admirable efforts offers guidance on screening, exhibiting, and supporting the artistic project of one of cinema's greatest filmmakers.The Criterion Collection has announced its next releases, including Terrence Malick's 2011 masterpiece, The Tree of Life, which offers a new "extended" cut of the film. Variety has further details on the release.One of our favorite contemporary genre filmmakers,
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‘The Rider’ Director Chloé Zhao Treats Non-Actors Like Pros: ‘Once Upon a Time, Our Greatest Actors Were Discovered’ – Podcast

‘The Rider’ Director Chloé Zhao Treats Non-Actors Like Pros: ‘Once Upon a Time, Our Greatest Actors Were Discovered’ – Podcast
Chloé Zhao’s breakout second feature film, “The Rider,” is based on the real life of the film’s star Brady Jandreau – a young rodeo rider who, after suffering a massive brain injury while competing, faces an existential crisis about his place in this world. In the film, Jandreau draws on his life experiences and is surrounded by a cast of his real-life family and friends, but his quiet and introspective character (Brady Blackburn) is the polar opposite of his real-life personality.

“Brady Blackburn is very somber, Brandy Jandreau isn’t – he’s the happy kid trying to make everyone laugh,” said Zhao when she was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast. “When I first saw him, I didn’t speak to him. I was in the basement and he walked in and I just immediately thought, what a great face and the camera was going to love his face.
See full article at Indiewire »

New 3-Hour Cut Of Terrence Malick’s ‘The Tree Of Life’ Highlights August’s Criterion Collection Additions

As we mentioned recently, Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life” is getting the Criterion treatment soon, and it looks to be a must-have for any true cinephile’s collection. The Criterion Collection just announced their August 2018 offerings, and headlining the group is Malick’s 2011 epic.

Read More: Check Out 10 Unused Posters For Terrence Malick’s ‘The Tree Of Life’ From A Gallery Of Over 90 Concepts

The Criterion Collection release of “The Tree of Life” features a new 4K digital restoration of the film, as well as all the bells and whistles you might expect from a Criterion release.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘The Tree of Life’ Getting Extended Cut for Criterion Release

Attention, cinephiles! Terrence Malick has low-key been at work on an extended version of his 2011 Palme d’Or-winning film, The Tree of Life and it's coming to the Criterion Collection later this year. I know some of you are probably having a moment right now, so take a couple of deep breaths. Variety reports that Malick’s 139-minute theatrical cut will get another 50 minutes, which will arrive as a part of the Criterion special edition Blu-ray and DVD release coming later this year. Fair warning, the expanded 179-minute cut draws most of …
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Criterion To Release A Longer Version of Terrence Malick’s ‘The Tree Of Life’

Has the modern holy grail of cinema been found? There had been much talk over the years of an extended version of Terrence Malick‘s Palme d’Or winning 2011 film, “The Tree of Life.” In fact, in the famous lead up to the movie cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki revealed that the director was putting a together rumored a six-hour cut of the movie, from the over 300 miles of footage he had accumulated, with Malick’s longtime editor Billy Weber later teasing a DVD release.
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‘The Tree of Life’ Is Coming to the Criterion Collection With 50 Minutes of New Footage

‘The Tree of Life’ Is Coming to the Criterion Collection With 50 Minutes of New Footage
Seven years after winning the Palme d’Or at Cannes, “The Tree of Life” continues to grow. Variety reports that Terrence Malick’s 139-minute masterwork is coming to the Criterion Collection later this year with 50 minutes of new footage, much of it revolving around the Texas family played by Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, and Sean Penn. The film’s breathtaking birth-of-the-universe sequence remains unchanged.

“Terry doesn’t see this as a director’s cut,” Criterion president Peter Becker tells Variety, adding that the original theatrical version is indeed the official “director’s cut.” “It’s a fresh view of the film that has a different rhythm and a different balance.

“There’s a kind of cloud of myth that surrounds ‘The Tree of Life,’ that somewhere there’s a long-lost five-hour cut that was never released. That’s not the case,” Becker adds. “The film that he presented in Cannes
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Criterion Confirms, Details Terrence Malick’s New Cut of ‘The Tree of Life’

It has been nearly seven — seven — years in the making. While The Tree of Life‘s theatrical release was expanding, rumor emerged that Terrence Malick had been fashioning a very long cut that “would mostly focus on the middle portion of the film where we follow Jack (Hunter McCracken) as he grows up in 1950s Texas under the guidance of Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain’s characters.” Somewhere between five and six films later, Malick is bringing it home: Criterion’s Peter Becker revealed to Variety that a 179-minute alternate take — not a director’s cut, but “a fresh view of the film that has a different rhythm and a different balance” — is coming to home video later this year, its focus “primarily on the lives of the O’Brien family and the backstory of Jack (Sean Penn).”

Giving credence to those old rumors is the fact that Becker’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Terrence Malick’s ‘Tree of Life’ Gets Longer Criterion Version

Terrence Malick’s ‘Tree of Life’ Gets Longer Criterion Version
Terrence Malick has secretly been working on an extended version of “The Tree of Life,” which will be included by the Criterion Collection as a supplement to an enhanced special-edition Blu-ray and DVD release later this year.

The film, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, has grown 50 minutes of new branches — although roots might be a better metaphor, since the additional material focuses primarily on the lives of the O’Brien family (characters played by Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain) and the backstory of Jack (Sean Penn), whose search for meaning in the wake of his brother’s death drives a transcendental quest unlike any previously depicted on film.

“Terry doesn’t see this as a director’s cut,” says Criterion president Peter Becker, who insists that the 139-minute theatrical version is the official “director’s cut” and remains the centerpiece of the Blu-Ray edition.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Playback: Ethan Hawke on ‘First Reformed’ and His Troubadour Biopic ‘Blaze’

Playback: Ethan Hawke on ‘First Reformed’ and His Troubadour Biopic ‘Blaze’
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Oscar-nominated actor Ethan Hawke is as prolific as ever. He sauntered into Sundance in January with two films in tow — the Blaze Foley biopic “Blaze” (a directorial effort) and the Nick Hornby adaptation “Juliet, Naked” (a starring one). Releasing amid the summer blockbuster fireworks will be writer-director Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” the portrait of a pastor haunted by grief and heavier thoughts, a Bressonian figure that made for one of the ripest opportunities of Hawke’s career.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“I spend my life waiting for moments like that to happen again,” Hawke says of his first read of the script. “Paul Schrader is such a meticulous writer that the job of doing difficult things,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Does Cannes Have a Woman Problem?

Does Cannes Have a Woman Problem?
Does Cannes have a woman problem?

Over the course of its 71 years, the most prestigious film gathering in the world has feted the likes of American filmmakers such as Francis Ford Coppola, Quentin Tarantino and Terrence Malick, as well as male auteurs from all over the world. Despite its rich legacy, some glass ceilings remain firmly in place. Only one female director, Jane Campion, has captured the festival’s top prize, the Palme d’Or, and few women have traditionally been invited to screen their films in competition.

It’s a bad look, particularly given the historical moment. Time’s Up and #MeToo are dominating the conversation around Hollywood, and top female talent are pushing for pay equity and more opportunities, but Cannes has remained stubbornly resistant to change. This year’s gathering has only three films in competition from female filmmakers, which shockingly represents Cannes’ best showing since 2011. Over the past 10 years,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Terrence Malick Tries His Hand at Virtual Reality, and Becomes a First-Year Film Student

The Tribeca Film Festival again did a top-notch job in programming their Immersive section, with an impressive collection of premieres along with a well-curated collection of some of the best boundary-pushing work in virtual reality, augmented reality, and immersive installations. Nonetheless, for a movie fan wanting to carve out a couple hours to keep abreast of the new technology, a lineup like Tribeca’s can be overwhelming. It’s natural to gravitate toward a Vr experience by Terrence Malick — a familiar director with an well-established two-dimensional visual language, who might help a viewer decode an unfamiliar 360-degree story world.

From a two-dimensional perspective, Malick’s “Together” is similar to a modern-dance performance. For this six-minute 360 degree Vr experience, Facebook teamed the legendary director with Movement Art Is co-founders Jon Boogz and Lil Buck. In “Together,” the two dancers perform in an open black space, their stage defined by flowing white
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Cannes 2018 Breakout Directors: How to Stream Key Features From the Most Exciting Filmmakers

Cannes 2018 Breakout Directors: How to Stream Key Features From the Most Exciting Filmmakers
There was a lot of head-scratching (and complaining) when the Cannes 2018 lineup was first announced. A lot of major auteurs were nowhere to be found, while the Competition roster — generally accepted as the world’s most prestigious slate of new films — was littered with unfamiliar names. And though sidebars like Director’s Fortnight and Un Certain Regard are known for turning up the volume on unheralded voices, even those sections seemed to be unusually lacking in star power.

So what? Festivals are all about the joy of discovery, and it’s been a mighty long time since Cannes has provided attendees so many chances for attendees to find (and help coronate) their new favorite filmmakers. That being said, this is still Cannes, and the directors whose work has been included in the program aren’t coming from nowhere. They may not possess the pedigree of Jean-Luc Godard (or boast the
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Film News Roundup: Ruby Modine Returns for ‘Happy Death Day 2’ (Exclusive)

Film News Roundup: Ruby Modine Returns for ‘Happy Death Day 2’ (Exclusive)
In today’s film news roundup, Ruby Modine reprises her villain role in the “Happy Death Day” sequel, Passionflix has cast its leads for “Driven,” and Breaking Glass sets a June release for Lgbtq story “Hooked.”

Castings

Ruby Modine has signed on to reprise her role as Lori Spengler in Blumhouse Productions’ thriller sequel “Happy Death Day 2” opposite Jessica Rothe, Israel Broussard, Suraj Sharma, and Sarah Yarkin.

Modine, daughter of Matthew Modine, broke out as part of the cast of Showtime’s “Shameless” in 2016, then scored the role in director Christopher Landon’s “Happy Death Day” as a nursing student at Bayfield University and its campus hospital.

Landon wrote the original script, which he directs. John Baldecchi and Angela Mancuso serve as executive producers. Jason Blum returns as producer with Ryan Turek as co-producer.

Happy Death Day 2” starts shooting in New Orleans in two weeks. Modine is represented by Gersh.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Black Panther’ Cinematographer Rachel Morrison to Be Honored by AFI

  • The Wrap
‘Black Panther’ Cinematographer Rachel Morrison to Be Honored by AFI
Rachel Morrison, cinematographer on films like “Black Panther” and “Mudbound,” will receive the 2018 Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni medal from the American Film Institute.

Morrison made history this year as the first woman ever nominated for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for her work in “Mudbound.” She was also the first woman to shoot a Marvel Cinematic Universe film with “Black Panther.”

Her other credits include “Fruitvale Station,” “Cake,” “Dope,” “What Happened, Miss Simone?” and “Confirmation.”

Also Read: 'Black Panther' Cinematographer Rachel Morrison on Hollywood's Lame 'Excuse' for Not Hiring Women

Morrison, a member of the American Society of Cinematographers, has won a New York Film Critics Circle Award; she has also been nominated for a Primetime Emmy and an Acd Award.

The Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal honors creative talents who embody the qualities of the filmmaker, who earned a total of 28 Academy Award nominations and an Oscar for Best Director for “Patton” in 1970.

Also Read: Oscars Nominate First Female Cinematographer: Rachel Morrison for 'Mudbound'

Previous recipients include Patty Jenkins, Darren Aronofsky, Terrence Malick, Amy Heckerling, Anne Garefino, Steven Rosenblum, Todd Field and most recently, Frederick Elmes.

The presentation is set to take place at the AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute to George Clooney in Hollywood, California on June 7.

Read original story ‘Black Panther’ Cinematographer Rachel Morrison to Be Honored by AFI At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away

  • The Wrap
‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away
As a film critic and as a maker of documentaries about filmmakers, Kent Jones has steeped himself in the best of world cinema and remained engaged with it for years, and so the surprise of his first narrative feature as a writer-director, “Diane,” is that there is barely a trace of influence from other films or other directors.

“Diane” is a character study about an older woman played by Mary Kay Place, and it is an unusual, elusive, windblown sort of movie, always twisting and turning and moving in different directions. Whenever “Diane” seems to settle down for a moment to let us comprehend something about the lives of its characters, it jumps ahead or sideways or away from us; as in life, our understanding of what is happening and what it means keeps shifting. The tone here is elevated and a bit difficult sometimes, but the end point of all this difficulty is transcendent, and then something beyond even transcendence.

Place’s Diane is first seen asleep in a hospital room, with her dying cousin Donna (Deirdre O’Connell, “The Path”) watching over her. Diane is there to help Donna die, basically, but it is Donna who is there at the beginning to bless Diane with some attention, and that reversal is typical of this movie. Diane is shown as a conscientious woman who is always making lists and visiting her friends and family, most of whom are physically ill in some way; she is barely ever seen at home. We never do find out what she once did for a living, and we only hear about her deceased husband in passing.

Watch Video: Watch 'Westworld' Panel at Tribeca Film Festival Awkwardly End Right After Cringeworthy Fan Question

But we learn a great deal about Diane’s tortured relationship with her son Brian (Jake Lacy), who is a drug addict. At first, it appears as if the very selfish Brian never looks outside of himself and that Diane spends a somewhat inordinate amount of time helping others, and “Diane” seems to be getting at a difficult subject here.

There have been many movies about having detestable parents, but comparatively few films about having a detestable child. In many ways, having a detestable child is a far worse fate, because it’s relatively easy to reject hateful parents and almost impossible to reject a hateful child. But this is actually not what “Diane” is ultimately interested in.

When Diane goes to see some elderly family members and friends all huddled around a table in a kitchen, we can feel just how much comfort she takes in their presence because Jones switches to a much faster editing style with quick cuts that makes for a contrast to the scenes of Diane by herself, which begin to rely on dissolves to show how she is losing her grip on her life.

Also Read: Tribeca Film Festival Announces Full Slate, Nearly Half Directed by Women

Place has often been cast as a best-friend character on TV and in movies, and Diane is a best-friend type, on the surface. But as this movie goes on, we begin to realize that Diane hasn’t always been like this. “Diane” is a very insightful film about old age because it acknowledges how many different people a person can be throughout a long lifetime, and it’s a lucky person who isn’t ashamed of some of those younger variants of themselves.

This movie changes somewhat drastically when we see Diane go to a bar to get drunk because her awful son has gone missing. With a few drinks in her, we see a different Diane, an earlier version who liked a good time and wasn’t as hard on herself. She starts to dance by the jukebox, but then her drunken high spirits crash down low as we see her sitting at a table while the 1991 hit “I’m Too Sexy” plays, a piece of pop detritus that incongruously bobs back to the surface.

Will Diane ever hear that song again, or think of it? Will we? There’s a randomness to that silly old song coming on that points up the deliberate untidiness of this movie, its refusal to look away from moments that might not have any meaning.

Also Read: Teen Vogue Reporter: 'I Was Groped 22 Times' at Coachella While Covering Sexual Harassment

Though she has obviously had a lot of drinks, Diane’s voice sounds clear and calm as she asks for another, but the waitress thinks she has had enough, and she is basically told to leave the bar. “I remember you, Diane,” the bartender tells her. In that one line, we can hear a reaction to this other person Diane used to be, and we can sense that maybe she wasn’t too unlike her own son when she was younger.

There comes a point when Jones does briefly quote another director here. Diane starts keeping a journal, and there’s a section of this movie where we see what look to be her favorite moments from her past. These short shots are clearly an homage to the fleet-footed visual style of Terrence Malick, a filmmaker that Jones has praised in the past. But Jones ultimately has a far tougher point of view than Malick. The thing that’s so unsettling, finally, about “Diane” is that it stresses the formlessness of life.

Diane’s brown hair goes white. We hear her voice on the soundtrack, and she is wondering if she left the stove on, and if she took a pill she needed to take. If we get to be old, we are probably not going to be thinking about the best sex we ever had, or a poem we loved. When we are old and still clinging to life, our thoughts can rest on the small things that suddenly seem so important, like if we left the stove on, or if we took our pills.

“Diane” is not easy to take sometimes, but it never lies, and the performances from all the actors here tell the truth, too. Jones has always been unusually attentive as a critic when it comes to how much acting can affect or influence a movie, and so “Diane” is about many things, but it is also a movie about Mary Kay Place and her “Are you kidding me?” facial expression and what caused that expression.

This is a movie that notices things and people that we are trained to ignore, and you are not likely to forget it, even as the life of its heroine finally drifts away from her like a kite lost on a winter beach.

Read original story ‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

The Best Monster Movies to Watch Instead of ‘Rampage’ — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

Last weekend saw the release of “Rampage,” which may be the highest-rated video game movie on Rotten Tomatoes, but probably won’t go down in history as the king of monster movies.

This week’s question: What monster movie should people watch instead of “Rampage?”

Matt Zoller Seitz (@MattZollerSeitz), RogerEbert.com

The 2014 “Godzilla,” directed by Gareth Edwards. Try to watch it on the biggest screen you can find, in a dark room. It’s the most aesthetically daring monster movie, and one of the most daring big budget Sf films, released in the last decade, owing as much to “Close Encounters” as it does to anything Toho made. I was shocked by how much money it made. It was basically a Terrence Malick Godzilla movie, right down to the cutaways to other
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2018: Here Are 12 Movies By Female Filmmakers That Could Have Been at the Festival (It’s Not Too Late)

Cannes 2018: Here Are 12 Movies By Female Filmmakers That Could Have Been at the Festival (It’s Not Too Late)
As has become commonplace for the annual event, the Cannes Film Festival’s competition slate continues to be dominated by male directors. Announced yesterday, the 2018 competition lineup includes the highest number of films from female filmmakers since 2011, and the festival will play home to new works from Nadine Labaki, Eva Husson, and Alice Rohrwacher. At the festival’s announcement press conference, artistic director Thierry Frémaux hinted that another work from a woman could be added to the lineup in the coming days.

In years past, Frémaux has blamed the lack of female directors on the Cannes slate on the discrepancy between how many male and female directors are working today, and yet Cannes has often programmed and championed a number of the film world’s best female filmmakers. The lack of many of them from this year’s lineup is jarring — though, to be fair, this year’s lineup is
See full article at Indiewire »

Lars von Trier Won’t Return to Cannes (Yet), But Here’s the Story Behind His 2011 Banishment

While the Cannes Film Festival will not include five Netflix films, there was another notable omission when the festival unveiled its 2018 slate: Bad boy Danish auteur Lars von Trier will not return to the Competition with his latest “dark and sinister” film “The House that Jack Built” (IFC Films), starring Riley Keough, Uma Thurman, and Matt Dillon as a serial killer who narrates the story, Ripley-style — with humor. (Trier’s 2014 feature “Nymphomaniac” played Toronto and other festivals.) Von Trier was banned from the festival seven years ago, and while Cannes has suggested that it might invite him back, so far that hasn’t happened.

It’s possible that Trier could still make his way to Cannes, as artistic director Thierry Fremaux hinted at the end of his press conference. The head programmer has reportedly been talking through this possibility with Cannes’ influential board of directors, which represents a range of major film organizations in France.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Lars von Trier Won’t Return to Cannes (Yet), But Here’s the Story Behind His 2011 Banishment

While the Cannes Film Festival will not include five Netflix films, there was another notable omission when the festival unveiled its 2018 slate: Bad boy Danish auteur Lars von Trier will not return to the Competition with his latest “dark and sinister” film “The House that Jack Built” (IFC Films), starring Riley Keough, Uma Thurman, and Matt Dillon as a serial killer who narrates the story, Ripley-style — with humor. (Trier’s 2014 feature “Nymphomaniac” played Toronto and other festivals.) Von Trier was banned from the festival seven years ago, and while Cannes has suggested that it might invite him back, so far that hasn’t happened.

It’s possible that Trier could still make his way to Cannes, as artistic director Thierry Fremaux hinted at the end of his press conference. The head programmer has reportedly been talking through this possibility with Cannes’ influential board of directors, which represents a range of major film organizations in France.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2018 Lineup Includes New Films from Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Jia Zhangke, Bi Gan, and More

With a jury headed by Cate Blanchett, the main lineup for the 71st Cannes Film Festival has been unveiled, including Competition, Un Certain Regard, Out of Competition, Midnight, and Special screenings. This year’s competition lineup features some of our most-anticipated films of the year, including Jean-Luc Godard’s Le livre d’images, Lee Chang-dong’s Burning, Jia Zhangke’s Ash is Purest White, Spike Lee’s BlackKkKlansman, Jafar Panahi’s recently unveiled Three Faces, David Robert Mitchell’s Under the Silver Lake, Pawel Pawlikowski’s Cold War, and more. The Un Certain Regard section also includes one title we hoped might make it into competition: Bi Gan’s Kaili Blues follow-up Long Day’s Journey into Night.

While it’s clear there was going to be no Netflix films, there were a handful of rumored films that didn’t make the cut, though there’s the possibility of being added later.
See full article at The Film Stage »
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