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Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival Concludes This Weekend With Three More Great Films

The Tenth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series concludes this weekend. — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

There are three more events for the Tenth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival happening this weekend:

Friday, March 23rd at 7:00pm – Le Samourai

In a career-defining performance, Alain Delon plays Jef Costello, a contract killer with samurai instincts. After carrying out a flawlessly planned hit, Jef finds himself caught between a persistent police investigator and a ruthless employer, and not even his armor of fedora and trenchcoat can protect him. An elegantly stylized masterpiece of cool by maverick director Jean‑Pierre Melville, “Le samouraï” is a razor-sharp cocktail of 1940s American
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: Lost and Found—Raúl Ruiz's "Time Regained"

  • MUBI
Raúl Ruiz frequently remarked that he was the perfect person to adapt Marcel Proust’s vast set of novels Remembrance of Things Past (or, more literally, In Search of Lost Time) to the screen because, having reached the end of reading the entire work, he instantly forgot it all. He was joking, of course, but his jest disguised a serious method. The only way to convey Proust on screen, in Ruiz’s opinion, was to approach it not as a literal condensation of multiple characters and events, but as a psychic swirl of half-remembered, half-forgotten fragments and impressions—full of uncanny superimpositions and metamorphoses. “‘The best way to adapt something for film,” he summed up, “is to dream it.” Ruiz’s dreaming was always accompanied by extensive, meandering, seemingly eccentric research. In the case of Time Regained, he plunged (as he revealed in a splendid, lengthy interview with Jacinto Lageira
See full article at MUBI »

Fabrice du Welz to Direct ‘Adoration’ With ‘Happy End’ Breakout Star (Exclusive)

Fabrice du Welz to Direct ‘Adoration’ With ‘Happy End’ Breakout Star (Exclusive)
Acclaimed Belgian director Fabrice du Welz is set to direct “Adoration,” the third part of a trilogy that includes “The Ordeal,” which played at Cannes’ Critics’ Week, and “Alleluia,” which played at Directors’ Fortnight.

“Adoration” is being produced by Vincent Tavier at Brussels-based Panique! and Manuel Chiche at Paris-based The Jokers. Memento Films International has acquired international sales to the film. The Jokers will handle distribution in France.

Like “The Ordeal” and “Alleluia,” “Adoration” will explore the boundaries of a maddening, destructive love, this time between two children. It follows 12-year-old Paul, who falls in love with Gloria, a schizophrenic teenager in the mental institution where his mother works. Paul decides to help Gloria escape after she commits a crime, and together they embark on a trip that reveals the extent of Gloria’s dangerous madness and Paul’s devotion to her.

Tavier, who wrote the script with du Welz, said “Adoration
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘La Belle Noiseuse’ Trailer: Jacques Rivette’s Classic Returns For 25th Anniversary In 4K Restoration [Exclusive]

While filmmaking legend Jacques Rivette is perhaps best known for his 13-hour opus “Out 1,” the director’s latter-day career had its own share of masterpieces. And none were as epic as 1991’s “La Belle Noiseuse,” which is now returning to the big screening for its 25th anniversary, with a new 4K restoration, and in its full, uncut 238-minute runtime.

Starring Michel Piccoli, Jane Birkin, and Emmanuelle Béart, the film is about an artist becoming creatively reborn, as well as a dramatic documentation of the creative process.

Continue reading ‘La Belle Noiseuse’ Trailer: Jacques Rivette’s Classic Returns For 25th Anniversary In 4K Restoration [Exclusive] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100

Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100
Danielle Darrieux, one of the great French movie stars, died Wednesday in Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.

The star of director Max Ophuls’ classic early ’50s films “La Ronde” and “The Earrings of Madame de…” and Anatole Litvak’s 1936 “Mayerling” also made some films in Hollywood and, late in life, starred, with an all-star cast of fellow French female movie stars, in Francois Ozon’s “8 Femmes.”

In Ozon’s 2002 delightful musical mystery-comedy “8 Femmes,” the actress played Deneuve’s mother again, starring along with Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Beart, Fanny Ardant, Virginie Ledoyen and Ludivine Sagnier. The entire cast received a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for outstanding artistic achievement as well as the European Film Award for best actress.

Born in Bordeaux, Darrieux was raised in Paris. At the Paris Conservatory she studied the cello and piano.

Darrieux auditioned for a secondary role as a willful teenager in the 1931 musical “Le Bal” when she was only 14, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rani Mukerji honored with Outstanding Contribution to Cinema Award

Rani Mukerji is one of Indian cinema’s most respected, loved and renowned stars. During her incredible cinematic career, the actress has been applauded for her brilliant performances in a range of roles and amazing films. In testimony to her outstanding work and her universal popularity with audiences at home and abroad, the government of Mauritius honoured Mukerji with the ‘Outstanding Contribution to Cinema Award’, as part of their run up to the 50th year of Independence celebrations.

The honorable Prime Minister of Mauritius, Pravind Kumar Jugnauth, presented this special award to Rani during the film festival Mauritius Cinema Week. This festival is part of the build up to 50th year of Independence of the Republic of Mauritius from British Rule. Interestingly, the film festival saluted close cultural and historical ties to both India and France and popular French actress, Emmanuelle Beart was also given the same honor.

Speaking about the award,
See full article at Bollyspice »

‘Scary Mother’ Takes Top Nod at Egypt’s Inaugural El Gouna Fest

‘Scary Mother’ Takes Top Nod at Egypt’s Inaugural El Gouna Fest
Rome – The first edition of Egypt’s ambitious El Gouna Film Festival wrapped Friday with psychological thriller “Scary Mother,” by Georgian first-time director Ana Urushadze, taking the Golden Star, the fest’s top feature film competition prize. The prize was awarded by a jury headed by U.S. producer Sarah Johnson (“Birdman”).

Oscar-winning actor-director Forest Whitaker was celebrated with a lifetime achievement award during the closing ceremony in the festival’s open-air auditorium, also attended by Oliver Stone. Both men held master classes.

Besides a trophy, “Scary Mother” (pictured), which is about a 50-year-old housewife struggling to choose between her family life and a passion for writing, scored $50,000 in prize money, to be divided equally between the director and the main producer. The film – a co-production between Georgia’s Studio Artzim and Gemini and Estonia’s Allfilm – also recently won the Sarajevo Film Festival’s top prize, and is Georgia’s selection for the foreign-language Oscar.

French-Lebanese
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Warner Bros. Signs First-Look Deal With French Company Marvelous Productions (Exclusive)

Paris – Warner Bros. has signed a first-look deal with Marvelous Productions, the Paris-based outfit launched at Cannes by former top-level execs at Pathé, Romain Le Grand and Vivien Aslanian and producer Marco Pacchioni.

Under the pact, Warner Bros. will have the opportunity to board any French-language project produced or co-produced by Marvelous Productions. The agreement underscores the Hollywood studio’s aim to increase its footprint in local production with strong partners.

“We have a deep respect for the talent and professionalism of the founders of Marvelous Productions, and we are convinced of their ability to deliver quality films that have a wide appeal,” said Iris Knobloch, president of Warner Bros. France.

Over the last few years, Warners Bros. has backed several French movies, most notably Michel Hazanavicius’s Oscar-winning film “The Artist” (pictured).

Le Grand and Aslanian were at the helm of Pathé for 19 years before exiting in 2016. Together, they produced and distributed many franchise-based French comedies
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivier Assayas to Preside Over Jury of Locarno Film Festival’s 70th Edition

Olivier Assayas to Preside Over Jury of Locarno Film Festival’s 70th Edition
Paris – Olivier Assayas, the French director/screenwriter of “Personal Shopper” and “Clouds of Sils Maria,” will preside over the international jury of the 70th edition of Locarno Film Festival.

One of Europe’s most critically acclaimed auteurs, Assayas won Cannes’ director prize last year for “Personal Shopper,” a supernatural drama with Kristen Stewart. “Clouds of Sils Maria” also competed at Cannes and earned Stewart a Cesar for best actress. Most recently, Assayas penned the script of Roman Polanski’s “Based on a True Story” which played out of competition at this year’s Cannes.

“As an auteur for whom formal research is tied to narrative requirements, Assayas has proved adept at always bringing out the talent of his cast,” the Locarno festival said, citing the “remarkable female roles played by actresses such as Emmanuelle Béart, Maggie Cheung, Virginie Ledoyen, Connie Nielsen and Kristen Stewart.”

Assayas’ international jury will select the winner of the festival’s Grand Prize
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivier Assayas Named President of Locarno Festival Jury

Olivier Assayas Named President of Locarno Festival Jury
Writer and director Olivier Assayas has been named president of the international jury of the Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland.

Assayas directed Kristen Stewart in Clouds of Sils Maria, for which she became the first American actress to win a Cesar award. He recently teamed up with Stewart again for Personal Shopper, which won him the best director honor last year in Cannes.

He has worked with a variety of leading actresses throughout his career, including Emmanuelle Beart, Maggie Cheung, Virginie Ledoyen and Connie Nielsen.

Assayas, in conjunction with the international jury, will pick the winner of the festival’s grand prize, the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Former Pathe Toppers Romain Le Grand, Vivien Aslanian Launch Marvelous Prods. (Exclusive)

Romain Le Grand and Vivien Aslanian, the duo at the helm of Pathe for 19 years before exiting in 2016, are launching new banner Marvelous Prods.

Le Grand and Aslanian are partnering with Marco Pacchioni, producer and founder of Master Movies. Pacchioni produced “Alone in Berlin” (pictured) with Emma Thompson, Brendan Gleeson and Daniel Bruhl, and co-produced Virginie Despentes’s “Bye Bye Blondie” with Emmanuelle Beart.

Marvelous Prods. will produce and co-produce content for film, TV and web formats. Since Pathe was solely involved in features, Le Grand and Aslanian did not produce TV drama, unlike the big film groups in France.

Marvelous is currently developing 10 projects and expects its first titles in theaters in 2018.

At Pathe, Le Grand and Aslanian produced and distributed many franchise-based French comedies, such as “Les Tuches” and “Camping,” as well as “Back to Mom” and “One Man and His Cow,” which were all highly successful at the local box office.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

3 Classic Films by Claude Chabrol

Being called the French Hitchcock does Claude Chabrol a disservice, as his dark thrillers approach mystery and suspense almost completely through character, not cinematics. These three very good 1990s productions are completely different in tone and approach, and each showcases a stunning French actress.

Betty, Torment (L’enfer), The Swindle (Rien ne vas plus)

Blu-ray

3 Classic Films by Claude Chabrol

Cohen Film Collection

1992,1994,1997 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 103, 102, 105 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / 49.99

Starring Marie Trintignant, Stéphane Audran, Jean-François Garreaud, Yves Lambrecht; Emmanuelle Béart, François Cluzet, Nathalie Cardone, Dora Doll; Isabelle Huppert, Michel Serrault, François Cluzet, Jean-François Balmer.

Cinematography: Bernard Zitermann; Bernard Zitermann, Eduardo Serra

Film Editor: Monique Fardoulis (x3)

Original Music: Matthieu Chabrol (x3)

Written by Claude Chabrol from a novel by Georges Simenon; Claude Chabrol from a script by Henri-Georges Clouzot; Claude Chabrol

Produced by Marin Karmitz (x3)

Directed by Claude Chabrol (x3)

Not all Claude Chabrol films are equal, but
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

41 trailer scenes that didn’t make the final film

Rob Leane Feb 10, 2017

Star Wars, Terminator 2, Fantastic Beasts and more: they all have scenes in the trailer, that never made the final film...

More often than you might think, scenes that appear in movie trailer don’t turn up in the finished film. This can leave trailer-loving audience members confused as the credits roll, wondering if they dropped off and missed something important.

See related Iron Fist: what to expect from Marvel’s Netflix hero Luke Cage smashed Marvel's 2016 Netflix ratings Daredevil season 3: Vincent D’Onofrio mulls Fisk's return Marvel's The Defenders: more images arrive

A couple of massive movies have done this recently, and the internet has been quick to fill in the blanks with speculation. Fingers have been pointed at tinkering studio bigwigs and extensive reshoots, when the reality is often a little less dramatic: filmmakers always chop some footage in the edit, and they rarely have much involvement in the trailers.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sociopsychological Drama with Central Gay Character, French Film Icon Top Nsfc Choices

2016 movies Things to Come (pictured) and Elle have earned French cinema icon Isabelle Huppert her – surprisingly – first National Society of Film Critics Best Actress Award. 2016 Movies: Isabelle Huppert & 'Moonlight' among National Society of Film Critics' top picks Earlier today (Jan. 7), the National Society of Film Critics announced their top 2016 movies and performances. Somewhat surprisingly, this year's Nsfc list – which generally contains more offbeat entries than those of other U.S.-based critics groups – is quite similar to their counterparts', most of which came out last December. No, that doesn't mean the National Society of Film Critics has opted for the crowd-pleasing route. Instead, this awards season U.S. critics have not infrequently gone for even less mainstream entries than usual. Examples, among either the Nsfc winners or runners-up, include Isabelle Huppert in Elle, Moonlight, Toni Erdmann, Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea, and Lily Gladstone in Certain Women. French
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Cohen Media Group Acquires 10 Jacques Rivette Movies for North America (Exclusive)

Cohen Media Group Acquires 10 Jacques Rivette Movies for North America (Exclusive)
Charles S. Cohen’s Cohen Media Group has acquired North American distribution rights to 10 features by French New Wave driving force Jacques Rivette for release by the Cohen Film Collection, Charles S. Cohen, Cmg chairman and CEO, announced Thursday.

Marking most probably the biggest deal to go down at the time of Lyon’s Lumiere Festival, where the Cohen Film Collection is one of the U.S’s highest-profile attendees.

Deal also takes in three very early and recently discovered Rivette shorts. The films, which will be individually restored and remastered by Celluloid Dreams, will be released theatrically beginning Spring 2017.

Twinning two of Charles S. Cohen’s defining film passions – classic films and French cinema – deal was closed by Cmg Svp John Kochman, and Hengameh Panahi, president of Paris-based film sales-production company Celluloid Dreams.

Francois Truffaut’s best friend in the 1950s, regarded as the Cahiers du Cinema’s most assertive writer,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Half Century Halle (and other anniversaries)

On this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

1040 King Duncan is killed in battle and King Macbeth succeeds him. Shakespeare fictionalizes everything later for Macbeth. So many theatrical productions and movies follow. Out damn spot!

1932 The 1932 Summer Olympics end. This is the Olympic year when gorgeous Buster Crabbe became a gold medalist (pictured left). Hollywood then snatched him right up for movie serials and action adventure franchises including Tarzan The Fearless

1945 Japan surrenders during Ww II (the six year war will last only two more weeks.) but movie makers all over the world have never stopped telling the war's infinite stories. On that same day Steve Martin is born in Waco Texas. It only takes him another 68 years to get the Oscar he totally deserved

1946 Two actor birthdays: Blacksploitation actor Antonio Fargas who became "Huggybear" on TV's popular Starksy & Hutch and Susan Saint James TV of McMillan & Wife
See full article at FilmExperience »

Lesbian Lives Matter in Summertime

Quite early on in Catherine Corsini's embraceable French import Summertime, a group of young Parisian women run through the streets, laughing aloud while pinching male asses. Viva, Simone de Beauvoir! The buttocks-ravished men are both startled and outraged. How dare they be made into sexual objects. One gent even starts attacking a lass, but to her rescue comes farm-girl/tractor-driver/physically strapping Delphine (Izïa Higelin).

Please note the year is 1971 and feminism is a-brewing, pleasantly knocking the closeted, recent rural-escapee for a loop. Suddenly, she's not in a field with gaseous bovines but in a bus encircled by attractive, long-haired, rowdy, activist Amazons, who care not a whit whether one is into scissoring or the missionary position. All sex is good. All male subordination of the "fairer" gender is bad. They even sing, "Arise, enslaved woman."

Suddenly, our enthralled heroine is attending political conscious-raising groups, helping to cause havoc at anti-abortion lectures,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Death of a French maverick by Richard Mowe

Jacques Rivette: Nouvelle Vague director with a reputation for lengthy films Photo: Unifrance

A French film director who was an integral part of the French New Wave (or Nouvelle Vague), has died in Paris at the age of 87.

Jacques Rivette’s celebrated films include Paris Belongs To Us, Celine And Julie Go Boating in 1974 and the four-hour La Belle Noiseuse with Emmanuelle Béart, Michel Piccoli and Jane Birkin in 1991 (dealing with an elderly artist and his creative rebirth). He worked alongside the likes of François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard and Claude Chabrol in whose apartment he shot his first short film Le Coup de Berger. He was also a writer with Cahiers du Cinema magazine and assumed the editor’s chair from 1963 to 1965.

He borrowed money from the magazine to fund his first feature, Paris Belongs To Us, which was released in 1961. Its plot revolved around a group of actors
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Jacques Rivette, Cerebral French New Wave Director, Dies at 87

Jacques Rivette, Cerebral French New Wave Director, Dies at 87
French New Wave director Jacques Rivette, who often explored the blurry line between reality and fantasy in a career spanning six decades and more than 20 features, died Friday at his home in Paris. He was 87.

Rivette’s death was confirmed in a tweet by French culture minister Fleur Pellerin, who called him “one of the greatest filmmakers of intimacy and impatient love.” The director reportedly had battled Alzheimer’s disease for several years.

Avec Jacques Rivette disparaît l'un des plus grands cinéastes de l'intime et de l'impatience amoureuse. C'est un jour de profonde tristesse.

Fleur Pellerin (@fleurpellerin) January 29, 2016

In his films, Rivette, perhaps the least known of the major French New Wave directors, frequently took a semi-experimental approach to narrative. The films were partially improvised by the actors, and their prolonged running times allowed auds to wander around freely in their deliberately stagy worlds.

Three-hour-plus titles were the norm for the helmer,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lynch / Rivette. Locomotion, or: Dreams Are Orders I Obey: “Inland Empire” and “The Story of Marie and Julien”

  • MUBI
This article accompanies the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s dual retrospective of the films of Jacques Rivette and David Lynch and is part of an ongoing review of Rivette’s films for the Notebook, in light of several major re-releases of his work.Two masterpieces, made three years apart, evincing the power of the close-up in unexpected ways. Rivette, with an uncharacteristically tender emphasis, shows a tear roll down Marie’s cheek and drop onto her wrist at the end of The Story of Marie and Julien. In a movie otherwise consisting of unemphatic, shifting wide shots and the occasional functional insert shot, Rivette glides in gently to frame her face in pensive close-up—his first since Wuthering Heights?—as her expression becomes the unexpected crux of the scene. The tear, running through the bloodless canal dug into her wrist, silently resurrects her, gets her blood literally flowing again,
See full article at MUBI »
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