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Tribeca Review: ‘All These Small Moments’ Adds Up to an Unwieldy Whole

It’s called All These Small Moments for a reason — one that becomes clear with a final, out-of-nowhere moment of voiceover narration in case you hadn’t figured it out yourself by acknowledging how formative, complex, and emotionally draining each one of writer/director Melissa B. Miller-Costanzo’s dense scenes prove. Whether her current focal point is young Howie Sheffield (Brendan Meyer), one of the other teenagers at her disposal, the older object of his affection (Jemima Kirke’s Odessa), or his on-the-brink-of-divorce parents (Molly Ringwald’s Carla and Brian d’Arcy James’ Tom), you know each vignette will pack a surprisingly potent punch. The question becomes whether they earn that potency or culminate into something greater than their individual selves. And while I may lean towards “No,” the whole is still worth a look.

The film appears to want to work as a story from Howie’s singular vantage.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Pretty In Pink’ Reunion: Watch Molly Ringwald Take Down Jon Cryer With Her Rap Battle Skills on ‘Drop The Mic’

‘Pretty In Pink’ Reunion: Watch Molly Ringwald Take Down Jon Cryer With Her Rap Battle Skills on ‘Drop The Mic’
It’s the “Pretty in Pink” sequel that no one saw coming: Andie (Molly Ringwald) and Duckie (Jon Cryer) finally resolve a few things, via sick burns on TBS’ hip-hop battle series “Drop the Mic.” On this Sunday’s episode, Ringwald and Cryer lay it all out: Cryer proclaims, “You’re not Julianne Moore, you’re Julianne less!” But Ringwald hits him back hard: “You’re 5-foot-6, weigh 110, now were you the half man in ‘Two and a Half Men’?”

Watch the full clip below!

Both stars hold their own, but it’s a bit of an unfair fight: Ringwald dated the Beastie Boys’ Ad-Rock in the late 1980s, and she clearly picked up some rap skills and pointers while they were together.

Drop the Mic,” based on the segment from “The Late Late Show with James Corden,” is a bit of a celebrity roast, as stars come on and
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca: Molly Ringwald, Andrew McCarthy's Son Catch Up Over Dinner in 'All These Small Moments' Clip

Pretty in Pink fans have an extra reason to be excited for Molly Ringwald's new movie, All These Small Moments, which is making its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival.

The movie co-stars Sam McCarthy — the son of Ringwald's Pretty in Pink romantic opposite, Andrew McCarthy — marking a reunion of sorts for Ringwald and the elder McCarthy.

The coming-of-age story, written and directed by Melissa Miller, centers around a teenager (The Oa's Brendan Meyer), who's dealing with a crush on a girl (played by Jemima Kirke) as well as some family drama. Ringwald and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Bill Maher Makes Fun of Molly Ringwald for Criticizing John Hughes: ‘Should We Dig Him Up and Yell at Him?’ — Watch

Bill Maher Makes Fun of Molly Ringwald for Criticizing John Hughes: ‘Should We Dig Him Up and Yell at Him?’ — Watch
It may come as a surprise, but Bill Maher has another strong opinion and isn’t afraid of expressing it. In his latest “New Rule” segment, the “Real Time” host posited that we’d all be better off if we quit reevaluating pop culture through a contemporary lens — or, in his words, “stop being surprised every time you watch an old movie or TV show and find some of the ideas in it are old.”

Maher’s thoughts were prompted by both Molly Ringwald’s article in the New Yorker revisiting the films she made with John Hughes and the ongoing debate about Apu and “The Simpsons.” He noted that Ringwald found such movies as “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club” “troubling in the age of #MeToo” and was “was taken aback ‘by the scope of the ugliness.'” “Oh please,” he said. “They were teen comedies, not snuff films.
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Pretty in Pink Facts You Never Knew

10 Pretty in Pink Facts You Never Knew
"Blane? His name is Blane? That's a major appliance that's not a name!" Molly Ringwald, Jon Cryer, Andrew McCarthy, Annie Potts, James Spader, the late Harry Dean Stanton, a script from John Hughes and those killer songs by Omd and Psychedelic Furs? It's Pretty in Pink, one of the greatest teen dramadies of all time. Here, we'll take a look at 10 things you never knew about Pretty in Pink.

The other Andie.

John Hughes wrote Pretty in Pink specifically for Molly Ringwald after the pair made Sixteen Candles together. But the studio, Paramount, wanted the producers to look for a bigger name. Executive producer and screenwriter Hughes and director Howard Deutch offered the part to Flashdance star Jennier Beals, who turned it down. Thankfully, the pair went back to their original choice. Incidentally, Andie awesome thrift store aesthetic was based on Ringwald's real life personal style.

The other Blane.

Charlie Sheen
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bill Maher Has Had It With Critics Of Old Un-Woke Hollywood Fare

Update with video Bill Maher had something he wanted to say on Real Time to those who have blasted old TV shows and movies for their “un-woke” standards. Shove a sock in it. Enough with revisiting things,” Maher demanded, as his final New Rules entry on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher. “Stop being surprised every time you watch an old movie or TV show and find some of the ideas in it are – old,” the late-night host demanded. He cited a recent article by Molly Ringwald
See full article at Deadline TV »

Bill Maher Has Had It With Critics Of Old Un-Woke Hollywood Fare

Bill Maher Has Had It With Critics Of Old Un-Woke Hollywood Fare
Update with video Bill Maher had something he wanted to say on Real Time to those who have blasted old TV shows and movies for their “un-woke” standards. Shove a sock in it. Enough with revisiting things,” Maher demanded, as his final New Rules entry on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher. “Stop being surprised every time you watch an old movie or TV show and find some of the ideas in it are – old,” the late-night host demanded. He cited a recent article by Molly Ringwald
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Times move pretty fast! Rewatching 80s favourites in the age of #MeToo

Molly Ringwald’s reappraisal of The Breakfast Club has thrown an uneasy light on other 80s classics, with their casual treatment of rape and abuse, dodgy sexual politics and breezy paedophilia. We look at 10 of the worst with fresh eyes

Everyone has blind spots when it comes to things they loved as a child: you don’t remember how shonky your favourite toys were, or how weirdly racist your most-adored first books could be. Partly, this is because you encountered these things as a child and so didn’t think to question them, but it’s also because you don’t want to question them, because questioning them means rewriting your happiest memories.

This is probably why John Hughes has got a free pass for so long. Many of us who are now adults grew up with his films and cherished them with the fond sentimentality French novelists reserve for madeleines.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

As Molly Ringwald Turns On ‘The Breakfast Club,’ Dare We Laugh At Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’?

As Molly Ringwald Turns On ‘The Breakfast Club,’ Dare We Laugh At Amy Schumer’s ‘I Feel Pretty’?
Now that Molly Ringwald has renounced The Breakfast Club — writing in The New Yorker this month, she condemned its "inappropriate" messaging about sexual abuse — it seems safe to say that screen comedy is dangling by a thread. As noted earlier, Hollywood has boosted its roster of wide-release comedies by more than a third this year, after a notably weak showing in 2017. So far, one of those new comedies, WarnersGame Night, ranks in the year's box office Top 10. But the…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Rushes. Cannes Film Festival Poster, Schrader/Cage, Katsuhiro Otomo's "Isle of Dogs"

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSWith Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anna Karina in Pierrot le fou on the official poster for the 71st Cannes Film Festival, all signs point to Jean-Luc Godard's new film, Le livre d'image, premiering there this May.Isao Takahata—the master filmmaker, animator, and co-founder of Studio Ghibli—has sadly left us. Jasper Sharp has penned a thoughtful, thorough obituary for The Guardian.The Czech New Wave director Juraj Herz has also died, reports Czech Journal.Hirokazu Kore-eda's highly productive filmmaking pace continues with a new project, and The Playlist reports that Juliette Binoche, Catherine Deneuve, and perhaps even Ethan Hawke, are aboard.Recommended VIEWINGTerry Gilliam's decades-in-the-making dream project, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, is finally near. Above is the raucous first trailer led by the aptly paired duo of Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver.
See full article at MUBI »

The Collider.com Podcast: Episode 136 – ‘A Quiet Place’ and ‘Blockers’

This week on The Collider.com Podcast, we’re talking about A Quiet Place and Blockers. We start off our spoiler-free discussion with A Quiet Place, discuss why it's so effective, how it compares to director John Krasinski's previous features, and more. Then we move on to a discussion about Blockers, why it works so well, how it stacks up against other raunchy comedies, and then we move into a discussion about Molly Ringwald's New Yorker article where she wrestles with how to view older movies that have questionable aspects to our current times. We finish …
See full article at Collider.com »

As John Hughes’ Films Face Criticism, ‘Love, Simon’ Marks a New Era For Teen Movies

As John Hughes’ Films Face Criticism, ‘Love, Simon’ Marks a New Era For Teen Movies
For decades, John Hughes’ six-movie run between 1984 and 1987 was the gold standard of teen-centric high school films including “Sixteen Candles,” “The Breakfast Club,” “Pretty in Pink,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” and “Some Kind of Wonderful.” Hughes didn’t direct all of those films, but was sole screenwriter on each — enough to stamp them in the cultural consciousness as “John Hughes films,” a term that became synonymous with the teen cinematic experience.

Save for perhaps “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” which centers on a kid who is literally too cool for school, Hughes’ work centered on characters who were “other.” That’s also proved to be a saving grace in reexamining Hughes’ work. His ’80s-era muse, Molly Ringwald, recently wrote an essay for The New Yorker that explored her relationship with his films from her 2018 perspective.

What she unearthed was well-considered and thoughtful, and it forced both her and her
See full article at Indiewire »

Molly Ringwald Reveals Her “Troubling” Feelings About Sexual Harassment In ‘The Breakfast Club’

Molly Ringwald, 50, has written an op-ed article for the New Yorker describing her “troubling” feelings when her daughter asked to watch The Breakfast Club with her. Ringwald recalled the uneasy feeling when her daughter asked to watch the iconic 1980s movie. “When my daughter proposed watching The Breakfast Club together, I hesitated, not knowing how […]

Source: uInterview

The post Molly Ringwald Reveals Her “Troubling” Feelings About Sexual Harassment In ‘The Breakfast Club’ appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

Chrissy Teigen To Be Honored At City Harvest 35th Anniversary Gala

City Harvest will host its 35th Anniversary Gala to support the organization’s work to rescue good food that would otherwise go to waste and deliver it to New Yorkers in need.

Honorees include José Andrés, Bill & Wendy Mills, Robin Hood, and Chrissy Teigen. The event will be hosted by Clinton Kelly.

Additional guests to include: Ted Allen, Donatella Arpaia, Ron Ben-Israel, Emma Bengtsson, Michael Chernow, Michelle Collins, Dana Cowin, Richard Gere, Markus Glocker, Marc Glosserman, John Legend, Angie Mar, Danny Meyer, Marc Murphy, Jason Pfiefer, Molly Ringwald, Jean Reno, Eric Ripert, Aldo Sohm, Bill Telepan, Geoffrey Zakarian, and others…

When: Tuesday, April 24th

Media Check-In: 5:30 Pm

Cocktails: 6:30 Pm

Awards, Dinner: 7:30 Pm

Where: Cipriani 42nd Street

110 East 42nd Street

Find out more here.

From: http://www.looktothestars.org/news/17780-chrissy-teigen-to-be-honored-at-city-harvest-35th-anniversary-gala

Related past articles Stars Attend McM x (Red) Daily Front Row Fla After PartyStars Attend Point
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Is Reassessing Old Films a Good Thing?

Neil Calloway wonders if judging films by today’s standards is worthwhile…

It’s started, and we’re only going to see more of it; the reassessing of old films according to today’s political climate. It’s inevitable, and if we’re honest, has been going on in other ways for years. Think of all those articles about films that were ignored for awards a decade ago, or the rehabilitation of 1970s New Hollywood Cinema that came when Easy Riders and Raging Bulls was published. Reappraising films is a big part of film criticism.

Recently, two pieces have come out that look again at films from the 1980s. Molly Ringwald has written an article from a 2018 perspective on her collaborations with John Hughes, notably The Breakfast Club, where she claims her character is sexually harassed by Bender, played by Judd Nelson, and notes that despite this, they end up
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Molly Ringwald Questions Breakfast Club and John Hughes in Wake of #MeToo

Molly Ringwald Questions Breakfast Club and John Hughes in Wake of #MeToo
John Hughes is the undisputed master of teenage movies from the 1980s, but the #MeToo movement has Molly Ringwald revisiting these comedic, sometimes romantic dramas through a new lens. Ringwald was Hughes' muse during the early 1980s, crafting Sixteen Candles and Pretty in Pink specially for her and having her star in The Breakfast Club. The actress reveals that she doesn't make it a habit to revisit or own films but admitted to watching The Breakfast Club with her 10-year old daughter after the little girl asked to watch it with her mother.

Molly Ringwald's daughter didn't pick up on much of the talk of sex or drugs, but she did reportedly have an issue with the scene where Judd Nelson's Bender character goes under the table and sees Ringwald's underwear. It's implied that Bender touches her inappropriately, and it got Molly Ringwald thinking about the #MeToo movement. She
See full article at MovieWeb »

Molly Ringwald Revisits Problematic Scenes in John Hughes Films Amid #MeToo Era

Molly Ringwald Revisits Problematic Scenes in John Hughes Films Amid #MeToo Era
Though John Hughes' The Breakfast Club and Sixteen Candles have become beloved films since they were released in the '80s, actress Molly Ringwald, who rose to fame through her starring roles in both films, admits to now finding some scenes in those two movies problematic amid the #MeToo era.

In an essay she wrote for The New Yorker, published Friday, Ringwald says she began re-examining her films and relationship with Hughes with a newly critical eye after watching The Breakfast Club with her 10-year-old daughter. In one particular scene in the film, Judd Nelson's John Bender peeks under her character's skirt, with the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Molly Ringwald Is Troubled by ‘Breakfast Club’ Crotch Scene in #MeToo Era

  • The Wrap
Molly Ringwald Is Troubled by ‘Breakfast Club’ Crotch Scene in #MeToo Era
Thirty-six years after appearing as Claire in the “Breakfast Club,” actress Molly Ringwald revisited the cult-classic film with her 10-year-old daughter and was troubled by the crotch scene in the wake of the #MeToo era.

In a new essay for The New Yorker, Ringwald wrote, “It’s hard for me to understand how [director] John Hughes was able to write with so much sensitivity, and also have such a glaring blind spot.”

“I thought about it again this past fall, after a number of women came forward with sexual-assault accusations against the producer Harvey Weinstein, and the #MeToo movement gathered steam,” she continued. “If attitudes toward female subjugation are systemic, and I believe that they are, it stands to reason that the art we consume and sanction plays some part in reinforcing those same attitudes.”

Also Read: Jeffrey Katzenberg 'Deeply, Deeply Sorry' for Crude Molly Ringwald Diss He Denies Ever Saying

The scene in question involved Judd Nelson’s Bender who hides under Claire’s desk while the high schoolers are in detention. “While there, he takes the opportunity to peek under Claire’s skirt and, though the audience doesn’t see, it is implied that he touches her inappropriately,” Ringwald said. “I was quick to point out to my daughter that the person in the underwear wasn’t really me, though that clarification seemed inconsequential.”

The scene ended up being shot by an older actress because Ringwald (at 16) was still a minor. Even Ringwald’s mother protested the scene. “My mom also spoke up during the filming of that scene in ‘The Breakfast Club,’ when they hired an adult woman for the shot of Claire’s underwear,” the actress wrote. “They couldn’t even ask me to do it — I don’t think it was permitted by law to ask a minor — but even having another person pretend to be me was embarrassing to me and upsetting to my mother, and she said so. That scene stayed, though.”

Ringwald did commend Hughes — who died at age 58 in 2009 — for giving a voice to outsiders and the positive impact the filmmaker’s movies had on adolescent audiences.

Also Read: Molly Ringwald Says Me Too: 'Director Stuck His Tongue in My Mouth' at 14

“John’s movies convey the anger and fear of isolation that adolescents feel, and seeing that others might feel the same way is a balm for the trauma that teen-agers experience. Whether that’s enough to make up for the impropriety of the films is hard to say,” she said. “Even criticizing them makes me feel like I’m divesting a generation of some of its fondest memories, or being ungrateful since they helped to establish my career. And yet embracing them entirely feels hypocritical.”

“If I sound overly critical, it’s only with hindsight. Back then, I was only vaguely aware of how inappropriate much of John’s writing was, given my limited experience and what was considered normal at the time,” she added.

Read original story Molly Ringwald Is Troubled by ‘Breakfast Club’ Crotch Scene in #MeToo Era At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Molly Ringwald Explains Why She’s ‘Troubled’ by ‘The Breakfast Club’ Three Decades Later

Molly Ringwald Explains Why She’s ‘Troubled’ by ‘The Breakfast Club’ Three Decades Later
Molly Ringwald rose to prominence as John Hughes’ muse in the hit films “Sixteen Candles,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “The Breakfast Club,” but her most beloved movies are troubling her in hindsight. In a new essay for The New Yorker, Ringwald salutes and critiques her collaborations with Hughes, finding certain scenes in the director’s films to be misogynistic and homophobic. The actress makes it clear she loves Hughes and is proud of their work together, but that doesn’t mean their films should not be analyzed under a contemporary context.

While Ringwald was showing her daughter “The Breakfast Club” for the first time, the moment in which Judd Nelson’s Bender peeks up her character’s skirt stood out and made Ringwald uncomfortable. The actress writes that she “kept thinking about the scene” long after the viewing ended, and it wasn’t the first time she was forced to
See full article at Indiewire »

12 Best Movie Prom Scenes, From ‘Carrie’ to ‘Back to the Future’ (Photos)

12 Best Movie Prom Scenes, From ‘Carrie’ to ‘Back to the Future’ (Photos)
Ah, prom night. I remember it fondly: awkward hand holding, barely making eye contact, a freezing cold midnight boat ride on the lake, getting in around 4 Am and then going straight to bed. Good times. Wait, is that not how prom nights go for most teens? Typical movie proms are far more magical than what I assume is the average prom experience. We did not have Usher as a DJ at our party, nor did we have a ripping, literally ahead of-its-time guitar solo as our evening entertainment. I guess I should be thankful that my prom didn’t end with getting a bucket of pig’s blood poured over my head. This week “Blockers” imagines how three teenage girls form a pact to lose their virginity on prom night. I’m guessing their prom ends up going better than mine did. These are the best movie prom scenes:

Carrie

The prom scene in “Carrie” is a masterclass in demonic paranoia. Brian De Palma’s kaleidoscopic nightmare, with teens cackling at Carrie in silent, slow motion and the action broken up in split screen chaos, looks like hell unleashed. De Palma could’ve set this bloody climax anywhere, but to put it on prom night, such a pivotal moment in the transition to adulthood for so many teens, makes its emotional terror all the greater.

Back to the Future

What happens on prom night may feel like a matter of life and death for most teens, but it was literally true for Marty McFly, where if things didn’t go right during the “Enchantment Under the Sea” if we’re being exact, he would never be born. The Johnny B. Goode scene is a classic, a nostalgic throwback that shows Marty actually isn’t just a screw-up, one that provides an inspired nod to music history and ends on a great gag that still says a lot about Marty’s character.

Pretty in Pink

When in doubt, look to John Hughes. Just the sight of Molly Ringwald entering the room sends hearts racing in this scene. Instead of a showy dance number, Hughes found a tenderly emotional way to bring the kids back together, rub it in James Spader’s face, and even send Jon Cryer’s Duckie off on a good note. Cryer’s quick, knowing glance to the camera is hysterical.

“Napoleon Dynamite”

“I like your sleeves. They’re real big.” After about an hour of deadpan awkwardness, “Napoleon Dynamite” proved it had a heart too once it went to prom and Pedro loaned out Deb to Napoleon for a dance.

“It’s a Wonderful Life”

There’s no calling “It’s a Wonderful Life” a teen movie, but it does have a charming prom scene, where the gag isn’t that James Stewart and Donna Reed fall into a pool beneath the gymnasium floor, but that Stewart’s George Bailey has the charm and tenacity to keep splashing his arms around dancing long after they’ve been water logged.

Grease

There aren’t many teen films where the prom isn’t the emotional high point or biggest set piece in your movie, but the hand-jive is always going to be less interesting than “Summer Nights” or “Greased Lightnin.'”

Footloose

“Let’S Dance!” This glittery prom scene has become so iconic, now Kevin Bacon has to slip the DJ a $20 every time he goes to a wedding.

Mean Girls

Technically it’s the “Spring Fling” and not the prom, but Cady’s totally unnecessary speech is very sweet, and you gotta love those matching purple suits rocked by Janice and Damian.

“10 Things I Hate About You”

Bonus: “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

I know, this is a scene from Homecoming. These are Totally different events in a high schooler’s life. But this scene from Stephen Chbosky’s “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is beautiful. I can relate to that invigorating sensation when the DJ amazingly plays some actual good music. Logan Lerman working his body into a rhythm in the hopes that Dexys Midnight Runners can provide some courage is a stirring image, and it’s even more touching when Emma Watson and Ezra Miller welcome him with open arms.

Read original story 12 Best Movie Prom Scenes, From ‘Carrie’ to ‘Back to the Future’ (Photos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »
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