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Robert Downey, Jr. movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Iron Man,’ ‘Tropic Thunder,’ ‘Chaplin,’ ‘Zodiac’

  • Gold Derby
Robert Downey, Jr. movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Iron Man,’ ‘Tropic Thunder,’ ‘Chaplin,’ ‘Zodiac’
Ten years after he first donned Iron Man’s suit of armor, Robert Downey Jr. has reprised his role as the billionaire superhero in the Marvel epic “Avengers: Infinity War.” The film finds the universe’s greatest heroes teaming up to stop the deadly Thanos (Josh Brolin) from gathering the infinity stones with the intention of wiping out half of the universe’s population. Downey Jr. first played the role in 2008’s “Iron Man,” and has appeared in eight subsequent Marvel movies. Of course, his career hasn’t been limited to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. So in honor of his latest big screen achievement, let’s take a look back on some of his best performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Downey Jr.’s 20 greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

The son of underground filmmaker Robert Downey Sr. and actress Elsie Downey, Robert Downey Jr. made his
See full article at Gold Derby »

Robert Downey, Jr. Movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Robert Downey, Jr. Movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Ten years after he first donned Iron Man’s suit of armor, Robert Downey Jr. has reprised his role as the billionaire superhero in the Marvel epic “Avengers: Infinity War.” The film finds the universe’s greatest heroes teaming up to stop the deadly Thanos (Josh Brolin) from gathering the infinity stones with the intention of wiping out half of the universe’s population. Downey Jr. first played the role in 2008’s “Iron Man,” and has appeared in eight subsequent Marvel movies. Of course, his career hasn’t been limited to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. So in honor of his latest big screen achievement, let’s take a look back on some of his best performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Downey Jr.’s 20 greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

The son of underground filmmaker Robert Downey Sr. and actress Elsie Downey, Robert Downey Jr. made his
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘The Business': How Hollywood Became the Center of the Entertainment Industry (Video)

‘The Business': How Hollywood Became the Center of the Entertainment Industry (Video)
So you want to make it in Hollywood? If you’ve moved out here for the sun, surf and stars — welcome! Los Angeles has a lot to offer and is the perfect place to pursue a career in the entertainment industry. But you may be wondering just why Hollywood ended up here in Southern California and not, as the legend goes, in Flagstaff, Arizona.

In this first episode of “The Business,” a new video series produced by TheWrap, we ask, why is Hollywood the center of the entertainment industry? How did Hollywood end up in… Hollywood?

TheWrap’s Paul Nyhart leads you through the history of the early days of cinema and the formation of Tinseltown. Where does the name “Hollywood” came from? How did early filmmakers push the boundaries of what a movie could be? Why did D.W. Griffith, Lillian Gish, Douglas Fairbanks, Charles Chaplin and more artists come west? Why was Los Angeles the perfect place to settle down and make movies? What role did Thomas Edison have in shaping the industry?

Also Read: Pay Attention Or Fall Behind: Industry Pros Share How to Get Ahead in Entertainment (Video)

We answer all these questions and more in this first episode of “The Business.” In future episodes, TheWrap will speak with experts in the industry and take you through the history of Hollywood.

Watch the video for “The Business” above.

Read original story ‘The Business': How Hollywood Became the Center of the Entertainment Industry (Video) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Joan of Arc (1948)

Does every great actress see Joan of Arc as the ultimate serious role? Ingrid Bergman ran into serious career trouble while this picture was still in release. Its cast and credits are packed with star talent — is it a misunderstood classic with a great central performance? Ms. Bergman was so enamored with the character that she played it twice.

Joan of Arc

70th Anniversary Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / Color / 1:37 flat full frame / 146 100 min. / Street Date March 27, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Ingrid Bergman, Jos&eacute Ferrer, Francis L. Sullivan, J. Carrol Naish, Ward Bond, Shepperd Strudwick, Gene Lockhart, John Emery, Leif Erickson, Cecil Kellaway.

Cinematography: Winton Hoch, William V. Skall, Joseph Valentine

Film Editor: Frank Sullivan

Special Effects: Jack Cosgrove, John P. Fulton

Original Music: Hugo Friedhofer

Written by Andrew Solt, Maxwell Anderson, from his play

Produced by Walter Wanger

Directed by Victor Fleming

What becomes of a grandiose
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Why the Original ‘Jumanji’ Remains Relevant

The best comedies and kids films are informed by the promise and aftereffects of brutal, scarring adulthood. The Gold Rush, for all of Charlie Chaplin’s gracefully clumsy contortions, is set in a world where cannibalism, disease, and rampant death are day-to-day realities. The computer love of Wall-e is adorable until you realize that the future involves a calcified Earth and a life of seated content intake on a massive spaceship. And in Joe Johnston’s Jumanji, the youthful adventures of the protagonists barely hide ideas of loss, mortality, time, and guilt in the guise of Robin …
See full article at Collider.com »

My Favorite Film Screenings of 2017

Here are my favorite film experiences of the year: 10. Loving Vincent (2017; dir. Dorota Kobiela & Hugh Welchman; Lincoln Plaza Cinema) 9. The Red Turtle (2016; dir. Michaël Dudok de Wit; Lincoln Plaza Cinema) 8. Metropolis (1927; dir. Fritz Lang; Marble Collegiate Church) 7. La Belle et la Bête (1946; dir. Jean Cocteau; Tribeca Film Festival at Town Hall) 6. The Last Animals (2017; dir. Kate Brooks; Tribeca Film Festival at Cinépolis Chelsea) 5. City Lights (1931; dir. Charlie Chaplin; United Palace) 4. Harmony of Difference (2017; dir. Kamasi Washington; Whitney Biennial) 3. Romeo + Juliet (1996; dir. Baz Luhrmann; Little Cinema at House of Yes) 2. Imponderable (2015-16; […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection
How do you follow up a record-breaking blockbuster about a killer shark? For starters, you get out of the ocean. And then maybe you look up.

A longtime watcher of the skies, young Steven Spielberg had already been kicking around an idea involving alien visitation, spacecraft "sightings" and government cover-ups – some sort of story, in the gentleman's own words, about "UFOs and Watergate" – before he had started turning Peter Benchley's novel Jaws into a movie. One three-men-and-an-apex-predator hit later, he was a hot Hollywood director who had folks ready
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection
How do you follow up a record-breaking blockbuster about a killer shark? For starters, you get out of the ocean. And then maybe you look up.

A longtime watcher of the skies, young Steven Spielberg had already been kicking around an idea involving alien visitation, spacecraft "sightings" and government cover-ups – some sort of story, in the gentleman's own words, about "UFOs and Watergate" – before he had started turning Peter Benchley's novel Jaws into a movie. One three-men-and-an-apex-predator hit later, he was a hot Hollywood director who had folks ready
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Justin Baldoni Aims to Break Down Masculinity at 'Man Enough' Premiere

Jane the Virgin star Justin Baldoni premiered his new talk show, Man Enough, on Wednesday evening in Los Angeles. The show is produced by Baldoni's company, Wayfarer Entertainment.

In the first episode, screened to an intimate crowd of friends and family in the Charlie Chaplin screening room at Raleigh Studios, Baldoni hosted a chat over dinner with comedian Bassem Youssef, Hamilton star Javier Munoz, Dancing With the Stars pro Derek Hough, How to Get Away With Murder star Matt McGorry and spoken-word artist and rapper Prince Ea.

The wide-ranging conversation touched on issues of traditional masculinity, why men have...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Peter Debruge’s 10 Best Films of 2017

Peter Debruge’s 10 Best Films of 2017
2017 was the year of fanboys and wonder women, as the former grew almost deafening in their zeal (permitting no dissent on the unquestioned genius of the DC, Marvel, Star Wars and Apes franchises, even when the movies themselves disappointed), while the latter found a common voice and courageous platform to take on the honchos in showbiz, politics and many other fields who had the nerve to ignore that famous superhero adage, “With great power comes great responsibility.”

“The Reckoning” (my nickname for this essential, long-overdue upheaval) has finally brought accountability for the kind of sexual harassment and all-around misbehavior no one should have to face in the workplace, toppling some of the biggest titans of our industry in the process. My heart broke when I read the words of ex-Weinstein employee Lauren O’Connor’s internal memo: “The balance of power is me: 0, Harvey Weinstein: 10.” But the movies have long given us a model for optimism
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tippi Hedren Recounts What Happened When She Turned Down Alfred Hitchcock’s Advances

Tippi Hedren Recounts What Happened When She Turned Down Alfred Hitchcock’s Advances
Alfred Hitchcock made Tippi Hedren a star, giving her showy roles in “The Birds” and “Marnie.” But when she refused the director’s sexual advances, he threatened to destroy her career.

“When he told me that he would ruin me, I just told him do what he had to do,” recalls Hedren. “I went out of the door and slammed it so hard that I looked back to see if it was still on its hinges.”

During the shooting of their two movies, Hitchcock would get jealous and resentful when he saw Hedren speaking to male colleagues. At one point, when they were both in the back of a limousine, the director lunged at Hedren and tried to kiss her. In another encounter, during the filming of “Marnie,” Hitchcock asked the actress to touch him and shared romantic fantasies with her. After she rebuffed him, he chilled toward her.

“It was absolutely awful, and as soon
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A New Leaf – Olive Signature

Filtered through her experience as an unequalled comic performer, writer-director Elaine May scores a bulls-eye with this grossly underappreciated gem, fashioned in a style that could be called ‘black comedy lite.’ And that’s the release version mangled by the producer. What might it have been if May had been allowed to finish her director’s cut?

A New Leaf Olive Signature

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 102 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.99

Starring: Walter Matthau, Elaine May, Jack Weston, George Rose, James Coco, Doris Roberts, Renée Taylor, William Redfield, David Doyle.

Cinematography: Gayne Rescher

Original Music: Neal Hefti

Written by Elaine May from a story by Jack Ritchie

Produced by Hilliard Elkins, Howard W. Koch, Joseph Manduke

Directed by Elaine May

Olive’s next title up for Signature Collection status is A New Leaf, the directing debut of comedienne-writer Elaine May. It’s certainly a worthy title.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tom Cruise and the failed United Artists experiment

Simon Brew Dec 14, 2017

In late 2006, with much fanfare, Tom Cruise was announced as headlining a revived United Artists. But what went wrong?

Lurking in the corners of Netflix UK is a not-very-widely-seen Tom Cruise movie, that a decade ago was all set to herald a new filmmaking dawn. Directed by Robert Redford, and with a cast that includes Redford, Cruise, Meryl Streep and a then-relatively-unknown Andrew Garfield, Lions For Lambs looked on paper to be a heavyweight political drama. Its focus is on three stories: an ambitious politician giving an interview to tough reporter, an army platoon being ordered to go on a top secret mission by said politician, and a professor trying to talk a promising student into turning his life around.

It looked like Oscar-bait. It turned out to be a footnote to the failure to resurrect United Artists.

United Artists was originally founded in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Petula Clark Keeps on Living for Today with New Album and U.S. Tour

Petula Clark makes it her mission to live for today, but she’d prefer to make an exception on the afternoon we speak. The iconic singer—best known for her string of million-sellers in the 1960s—turned 85 this day, and an attempt to begin our phone call with a happy birthday greeting is met with a faux groan. “No, no no—don’t go there. I haven’t done those for a long, long time,” she says with a good natured laugh.

Age is certainly irrelevant, but that goes double for Clark, who is currently in the midst of her
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Mystery Science Theater 3000: Volume Xxxix Review

Brad Cook reviews Mystery Science Theater 3000 Volume Xxxix…

MST3K Volume Xxxix is a bittersweet release because it marks the end of an era. Yes, this is Shout! Factory’s final new volume of Mystery Science Theater 3000 episodes. (They’ll keep re-releasing the old Rhino sets, however.) They say on their site that it’s the “almost certainly, probably definitely, maybe unquestionably final collection of never-before-released episodes,” so maybe there’s still some hope of more volumes in the series. Maybe?

Fittingly, this collection includes the show’s final episode, which skewers the 1968 spy film Diabolik, which was produced by Dino de Laurentiis. That one probably would have been worthy of a retrospective featurette, but the subject was understandably pushed aside in favor of Showdown in Eden Prairie: Their Final Experiment (10 minutes), which looks back on the making of the final episode.

The series finale sees Mike and the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Reality of a Reflection: An Exploration of Jean-Luc Godard's Filmography

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective For Ever Godard is showing from November 12, 2017 - January 16, 2018 in the United States.Jean-Luc Godard is a difficult filmmaker to pin down because while his thematic concerns as an artist have remained more or less consistent over the last seven decades, his form is ever-shifting. His filmography is impossible to view in a vacuum, as his work strives to reflect on the constantly evolving cinema culture that surrounds it: Godard always works with the newest filmmaking technologies available, and his films have become increasingly abstracted and opaque as the wider culture of moving images has become increasingly fragmented. Rather than working to maintain an illusion of diegetic truth, Godard’s work as always foreground its status as a manufactured product—of technology, of an industry, of on-set conditions and of an individual’s imagination. Mubi’S Godard retrospective exemplifies the depth and range of Godard’s career as
See full article at MUBI »

The Square – Review

Julian (Dominic West) endures the actions of a performer named Oleg (Terry Notary), in Ruben Ostlund’s satire The Square. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures (c).

Ruben Ostlund’s satire The Square was Cannes’ Palme D’Or winner this year but this ambitious film is a decidedly unusual winner. Ostlund’s previous film, Force Majeure, explored a single morally-bad choice in a caustically comic way. The Square turns a satiric eye on modern art, contemporary society, political correctness, homelessness, sex, income inequality and more, although it often focuses on the subject of trust. The Square, partly in English and partly in Swedish with subtitles, is sly, darkly satiric and sometimes laugh-out-loud funny film, when it is not just downright disturbing. This is not a film for everyone, but it has rewards for those up for its wild ride.

The story revolves around Christian (Claes Bang), the curator at a modern art museum in Sweden.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Miracle Worker

Anybody that appreciates good theater and good moviemaking will be in awe of Arthur Penn’s marvelous visualization of this tale of a determined woman achieving the impossible — teaching a child that can neither see nor hear. The knock down, drag ’em out scenes between Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke are unique, to say the least.

The Miracle Worker

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1962 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson, Andrew Prine, Judith Lowry.

Cinematography: Ernesto Caparrós

Film Editor: Aram Avakian

Art Direction: George Jenkins

Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal

Written by William Gibson, from his stage play

Produced by Fred Coe

Directed by Arthur Penn

I can barely believe that Arthur Penn’s obviously superior picture The Miracle Worker wasn’t picked off by Criterion years ago. It’s that good — it ought to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Celebrities Participate In Mptf's Reel Stories, Real Lives

Last week, Mptf (Motion Picture & Television Fund) hosted its sixth annual “Reel Stories, Real Lives” event, a unique evening of powerful readings which told the stories of industry members and their families who have benefitted from Mptf’s services in recent years.

Josh Hartnett Attends Reel Stories, Real Lives

Matthew Broderick, Josh Hartnett, Chrissy Metz, Jessica Rothe, and Will Fetters served as the storytellers. Each story was written by some of Hollywood’s leading feature and television writers including Dorothy Blyskal, Will Fetters, Seth Grahame-Smith, Monica Macer, and Billy Ray. The evening was hosted by actor/writer Kumail Nanjiani, and included a special piece featuring Paramount Pictures Chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos, introduced by Melissa McCarthy in a hilarious video piece.

To close the show, Gianopulos shared the story of why he got involved with Mptf back at the organization’s 80th Anniversary event. It was there that he heard Ethel Winant,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Review: The Death of Stalin (2017)

Anybody who discusses satire in audio-visual media at some point must mention the work of Armando Iannucci. Creator of TV’s The Thick Of It and Veep, with credits that include The Day Today and Alan Partridge, his work is some of the finest in Comedy. And in 2009, Iannucci made his big screen full feature directorial debut with The Thick Of It spin-off In The Loop (one of the best comedies of our times) and now, Iannucci casts his eye to even darker – and even more volatile – political territory with The Death of Stalin.

As concepts go, this film has a pitch black core, as it not only delves into a figure whose actions have reverberated throughout socio-political history but in looking at the events surrounding his death in 1953 and the power struggles within the Soviet Union, it is a brazen era, to say the least, in which to set a Comedy.
See full article at The Cultural Post »
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