Orson Welles - News Poster

News

Touch of Evil

When top-billed Charlton Heston pushed for co-star Orson Welles to direct this late noir, nobody imagined it would emerge as one of the key works in the Welles canon despite being recut and partially reshot by Universal. His last Hollywood studio venture stacks up as probably Welles’ most popular picture although in 1958 it was dumped into theaters as a second feature. Zsa Zsa’s in it for one shot with one line. Here’s F.X. Feeney with a great breakdown of Welles’ technique in Touch of Evil. And while we’re on the subject of Orson, here’s “The Most Complete Investigation into the Making of Citizen Kane“.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cannes vs. Netflix Defines Fight for Cinema’s Future

Cannes vs. Netflix Defines Fight for Cinema’s Future
The Cannes Film Festival is still three weeks away, but we can already agree on its biggest disappointment: the fact that “The Other Side of the Wind” won’t premiere there. For years, it has been the Holy Grail of movie buffs to experience Orson Welles’ final film — or, at least, a scrupulously assembled version of what it might have been. “The Other Side of the Wind” has the potential to be the cinematic equivalent of the triumphant 2004 reconstruction of Brian Wilson’s album “Smile”: the fragments of a (possible) masterpiece pulled together and finally made whole. And Cannes has always felt like the right, reverent place for it.

The reason it isn’t happening, of course, is that “The Other Side of the Wind” is being distributed by Netflix, the streaming colossus that shepherded and financed the film’s reconstruction. Last week, Netflix’s chief content officer, Ted Sarandos,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jeremy Saulnier Says Anyone Who Believes His Upcoming Netflix Movie Isn’t A Real Movie Should “Stab Themselves In The Face”

With the Cannes vs. Netflix debate in full swing, we’re starting to hear from filmmakers that were caught in the crossfire. Yesterday, we reported that Orson Welles’ daughter, Beatrice, had written an email to Netflix, asking the streaming service to reconsider their Cannes ban. One of the other filmmakers involved is Jeremy Saulnier, whose “Hold the Dark” was a strong contender to be included in the festival.
See full article at The Playlist »

2018 Cannes Film Festival lineup announced

Yesterday, the 2018 Cannes Film Festival lineup was announced bright and early. As always, it’s a moment in the cinematic year that marks a turning point of sorts. In fact, it really does seem like it positions us to start thinking about what might play on the festival circuit this fall. We’re a ways off, but with Cannes letting loose their news, the mind can tend to wander and start speculating. We already knew that Ron Howard’s Solo: A Star Wars story was a special early addition to the fest, having its premiere there. We also already had been told that Everybody Knows from Asghar Farhadi was the Opener. Now, we know much more. The crop of titles so far seems to have even more of an international flavor than usual. In fact, aside from the previously announced special screening of Howard’s Solo: A Star Wars Story,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Orson Welles’ Daughter Pleaded With Netflix To Reconsider Decision Not To Take His Movie To Cannes

Orson Welles’ Daughter Pleaded With Netflix To Reconsider Decision Not To Take His Movie To Cannes
Orson Welles’ daughter Beatrice has added her voice to the on-going dispute between Cannes and Netflix. The actress and designer, who also administers the Orson Welles estate, sent a letter to Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos on Sunday asking him to reconsider his plan not to send her father’s film The Other Side Of The Wind to the festival. "I was very upset and troubled to read in the trade papers about the conflict with the Cannes Film Festival," Beatrice…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Filmmakers and Producers Call Netflix’s Cannes Split ‘A Complete Shame’ — Exclusive

Cannes and Netflix could be a perfect match: the highest-profile film festival in the world and the film industry’s biggest disruptor, joining forces to sustain the future of the art form. For now, however, the two institutions are in a standoff that has no end in sight, leaving filmmakers and producers in a state of frustration.

After facing pressure from French exhibitors, Cannes added a rule in 2017 that required official competition entries to plan a French theatrical release. That’s a nonstarter for Netflix, since France mandates a three-year window before theatrical releases can be seen on streaming platforms. When Netflix and Cannes couldn’t come to terms, Netflix pulled all of its films.

The five titles included Alfonso Cuaron’s long-awaited return to Mexico with the 70mm “Roma” (which Cannes offered to play in competition if Netflix released the film in France) and the restoration of Orson Welles’ final feature,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes’s Thierry Fremaux on Netflix: ‘The Door Is Not Shut’

Cannes’s Thierry Fremaux on Netflix: ‘The Door Is Not Shut’
Cannes Film Festival’s artistic director Thierry Fremaux has been taking the heat all day.

The official selection lineup, which he described as bold and full of surprises at midday in Paris, has sparked some criticism — there’s the lack of Netflix films, the under-representation of women in competitionas well as few American films and titles from established filmmakers. Add to that the voices of film critics and journalists complaining about ending morning press screenings ahead of gala premieres.

To be fair, the artistic director’s position towards Netflix seems to be much more political than philosophical. Last year, Fremaux had selected two Netflix movies, Bong Joon-ho’s “Okja” and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories,” to open in competition, and faced a massive backlash from French exhibitors, who are well represented on the board of Cannes Film Festival and control in many ways the local film industry. The exhibitors
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Orson Welles’ Daughter Asks Netflix To “Please Reconsider” Cannes Withdrawl

The war between the Cannes Film Festival and Netflix isn’t without casualties. Lost in the shuffle of the debate between Cannes and Netflix about the future of cinema are the films that were all thought to take part in the event but are now left in the dust. One of those is the Orson Welles film “The Other Side of the Wind.” And now, the late-filmmaker’s daughter has entered the fray with her own thoughts on the debate.
See full article at The Playlist »

Cannes Says ‘It’s Too Bad’ Netflix Is Banning Films From 2018 Festival: ‘They Are Welcome Here, the Debate Is Open’

Cannes Says ‘It’s Too Bad’ Netflix Is Banning Films From 2018 Festival: ‘They Are Welcome Here, the Debate Is Open’
Cannes artistic director Thierry Frémaux has responded to Netflix’s announcement that it will not screen films at the 2018 festival. Addressing press during the Cannes lineup announcement, Frémaux explained the festival is still open to talking with Netflix’s Ted Sarandos and Reed Hastings and presenting their films out of competition.

“Any film in competition should be open to distribution in theaters,” Frémaux said, reiterating the festival’s policy that only films with French theatrical distribution are allowed to compete for the Palme d’Or. The rule prevents Netflix films from premiering in competition, but it does allow the streaming company to present films out of competition.

“We made offers for two films by Netflix this year, one out of competition and one in competition,” Frémaux confirmed. “Netflix did not wish to release the [competition title] in theaters. According to the rule, this film will not be in competition. The film could not be in competition.
See full article at Indiewire »

Orson Welles’ Daughter Urges Netflix to ‘Reconsider’ Cannes Ban and Let Father’s Last Film Premiere

Orson Welles’ Daughter Urges Netflix to ‘Reconsider’ Cannes Ban and Let Father’s Last Film Premiere
Beatrice Welles, the daughter of Orson Welles, is speaking out in defense of her father following Netflix’s announcement that it won’t be submitting Welles’ final film to the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. Vanity Fair published part of an email Beatrice sent to Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s Chief Content Office, in which she urged him to “reconsider” his decision to remove “The Other Side of the Wind” from Cannes and begged Netflix not to be another studio that “destroyed” her father’s work.

“I was very upset and troubled to read in the trade papers about the conflict with the Cannes Film Festival,” Beatrice said in the email. “I have to speak out for my father. I saw how the big production companies destroyed his life, his work, and in so doing a little bit of the man I loved so much. I would so hate to see Netflix be
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes chiefs respond to Netflix row: "Come back, let's discuss"

  • ScreenDaily
Fremaux: ”Netflix is welcome to Cannes.”

Speaking at the press conference launching the official selection for the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, president Pierre Lescure and general delegate Thierry Frémaux addressed to the event’s ongoing dispute with Netflix.

Last night, chief content officer Ted Sarandos confirmed rumours that no Netflix films will be at the festival. Frémaux responded: “We made offers for two of those [Netflix] films, one in competition one outside of competition. It was for the rule to be abided by that the films could be sold to distributors, Netflix didn’t wish to release the movies into theatres, so
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard
The 2018 Cannes Film Festival will include new films from directors Spike Lee, Pawel Pawlikowski, David Robert Mitchell and Jean-Luc Godard, as part of a lineup light on American films and long on international auteurs both young and old.

Lee’s “BlacKKKlansman” and Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake” are the only American movies in the 18-film main competition, although Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” will screen out of competition.

Celebrated international directors in the competition include Pawlikowski, Matteo Garrone, Jia Zhang-Ke and Godard, who is bringing the new “Le Livre d’Image” to the festival more than five decades after he made the 1965 film “Pierrot le Fou,” which graces this year’s Cannes poster.
See full article at The Wrap »

Netflix and Ted Sarandos Are Right to Defend Their Auteurs at Cannes, but There’s a Cost

Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux is in an unenviable position. He needs, and loves, to bring name auteur filmmakers to his festival. There aren’t enough of them, and one of his auteur suppliers just pulled out of Cannes 2018. Last year, Netflix delivered Noah Baumbach (“The Meyerowitz Stories”) and 2011 Camera D’or jury head Bong Joon Ho (“Okja”). When the Official Selection is announced tomorrow morning, it won’t include Netflix films from Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”), Jeremy Saulnier (“Hold the Dark”), and Paul Greengrass (“Norway”).

That’s because the granddaddy of all festivals is in France, whose film industry maintains a complex, legally binding system of funding and releasing movies in which shares of revenues are given back to producers for production. It used to be the envy of the film world; now, it looks hopelessly out of date.

Any movie that plays in French theaters must wait 36 months
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Netflix and Ted Sarandos Are Right to Defend Their Auteurs at Cannes, but There’s a Cost

Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Fremaux is in an unenviable position. He needs, and loves, to bring name auteur filmmakers to his festival. There aren’t enough of them, and one of his auteur suppliers just pulled out of Cannes 2018. Last year, Netflix delivered Noah Baumbach (“The Meyerowitz Stories”) and 2011 Camera D’or jury head Bong Joon Ho (“Okja”). When the Official Selection is announced tomorrow morning, it won’t include Netflix films from Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”), Jeremy Saulnier (“Hold the Dark”), and Paul Greengrass (“Norway”).

That’s because the granddaddy of all festivals is in France, whose film industry maintains a complex, legally binding system of funding and releasing movies in which shares of revenues are given back to producers for production. It used to be the envy of the film world; now, it looks hopelessly out of date.

Any movie that plays in French theaters must wait 36 months
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

  • The Wrap
Netflix will not submit its original films to this year’s Cannes Film Festival, following a 2017 mandate that all eligible titles must get a theatrical release in France to be included in the festival’s main competition, TheWrap has learned.

Netflix’s prospective competition titles included Jeremy Saulnier’s Jeffrey Wright drama “Hold the Dark,” Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” and potentially David Mackenzie’s Chris Pine period drama “Outlaw King.” Paul Greengrass’ “Norway” is also on the horizon at the streaming service, though not all are thought to be completed or ready for screening.

The company also had Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind” — a film the legendary director never finished before his death in 1985. Netflix did it for him, with some change they found in the couch.

The entry would have been a lock for Cannes Classics category, along with Morgan Neville’s documentary about their completing it.

The Cannes rule requiring a French theatrical release did not apply to out-of-competition sections like Cannes Classics, and Netflix could have submitted its films for consideration in those sections. But it opted not to do so.

Also Read: Netflix Announces Acquisition of Seth Rogen - All of Him (Video)

News of Netflix’s withdrawal was first reported in a Variety Q&A with Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos. A Netflix spokesperson would not comment further.

Representatives from Netflix’s feature film acquisitions team are expected to attend the festival, according to an individual familiar with their plans, thought it’s unclear if film division head Scott Stuber will be among the attendees.

The prestigious festival made its rule change following protests from European theater owners, who hit the ceiling last year when Netflix strutted titles like Tilda Swinton’s “Okja” in the main competition despite the company’s plans to only stream the film on its digital service and bypass a traditional theatrical release.

“Netflix has been avoiding French regulation and fiscal obligations. These rules allow for the financing of our strong film industry and ecosystem which in turns allows for many French and foreign movies selected at Cannes to get made,” French theater owners said in a joint statement at the time.

Steve Pond contributed to this report.

Read original story Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Netflix Pulls Out of 2018 Cannes Film Festival Following Competition Ban Controversy

Netflix is officially removing itself from the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. Ted Sarandos, the streaming giant’s Chief Content Officer, confirmed the plan to Variety, noting that Netflix had no choice but to pull out of the festival after Cannes’ decision to implement a rule banning films without French theatrical distribution from competing. The rule meant Netflix could still premiere movies out of competition, but Sarandos says that wouldn’t make sense.

“We want our films to be on fair ground with every other filmmaker,” Sarandos said. “There’s a risk in us going in this way and having our films and filmmakers treated disrespectfully at the festival. They’ve set the tone. I don’t think it would be good for us to be there.”

“I don’t think there would be any reason to go out of competition,” Sarandos continued. “The rule was implicitly about Netflix, and Thierry [Frémaux] made
See full article at Indiewire »

FilmStruck: The start of something great?

Joe Jeffreys on FilmStruck

With the meteoric rise of online streaming over the past few years, you’d be forgiven for thinking the world’s entire DVD collection now resides in the world sharpest (and shiniest) landfill. For large swathes of public, film consumption is now solely confined to the use of either Amazon or Netflix, with the occasional, terrifying expedition to a local gum depository… I mean cinema. Whilst these platforms have come leaps and bounds in the past few years – particularly in their breadth of original content – there remains a deficiency in both.

Leaving aside their nightmarish interfaces (ask yourself how much of your life is spent scrolling thought Netlix or Amazon then breath a deep sigh) both platforms suffer from strangely limited catalogues when it comes to classic, independent and foreign cinema. Amazon does give you the opportunity to rent from a large catalogue on a film-by-film basis,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Orson Welles' "The Other Side Of The Wind"

Sneak Peek footage from the unreleased satirical feature "The Other Side of the Wind" (1976) written/directed by Orson Welles ("Citizen Kane"), recently restored for a theatrical run, starring John Huston, Robert Random, Peter Bogdanovich, Susan Strasberg and Oja Kodar:

"...the film covers the 70th birthday party of movie director 'Jake Hannaford' (Huston), struggling to make a commercial comeback. It opens with Hannaford's death just after the party, and mostly focuses on the night before his death.

"We also see extracts of Hannaford's daring new film-within-a-film, 'The Other Side of the Wind'. As we learn more about Hannaford at his party, the audience realizes he is a far more complex character than he seems, and harbors several big secrets..."

Welles' original six-year shoot was plagued by difficulties with production, finance and casting, as well as complex legal problems that led to the negative being impounded and the film left unfinished for over 40 years.
See full article at SneakPeek »

Cannes Netflix row simmers again by Richard Mowe - 2018-04-09 19:02:43

Cannes contender (or not?) - Anders Danielsen Lie plays the terrorist Anders Breivik in Paul Greengrass’s Norway, about the killing of 77 people by the far-right extremist Photo: Nordic Film The Cannes Film Festival’s ongoing skirmish with the streaming giant Netflix continues apace with only days to go before the announcement of the Festival’s official programme on Thursday (April 12).

Thierry Frémaux, the Festival’s director, already had banned any titles in the official Competition and Un Certain Regard sections that would not have a cinema release (at least in France).

According to trade publication The Hollywood Reporter, Netflix had been due to premiere five films at this year’s festival, including, it has been suggested, Paul Greengrass’s Norway (about the 2011 terrorist attack) and Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma. Now, allegedly, Netflix has threatened to pull all the titles from the festival in response to the diktat from the organisers.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Andrew Haigh’s Favorite Films of All-Time

Following his two immensely heartfelt dramas, Weekend and 45 Years, Andrew Haigh’s latest theatrical feature, Lean on Pete, is now in theaters. “Most filmmakers when they make movies are trying to understand themselves and how they fit into the world. Even if the story of Lean on Pete might not seem like it’s a personal story, to me it is just as personal as Weekend, oddly. It says just as much about me as Weekend,” he recently told us. “The weird thing about making films, especially if you make films that are personal to you, is you’re giving something of yourself to the world. It’s a strange feeling, filmmaking to me is anxious, emotional and stressful.”

To celebrate the film’s release, we’re sharing Haigh’s list of his favorite films of all-time, submitted to BFI’s latest Sight & Sound poll and Criterion’s top
See full article at The Film Stage »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites