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Cannes Adds ‘Whitney’ Doc, New Lars Von Trier & Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

Following the initial announcement of the official selection last week, its seems that the organisers of he 2017 Cannes Film Festival have left the big surprises ’til last. The festival will screen the new Lars Von Trier film, welcoming him back after effectively banning him from the festival a few years ago. Von Trier will see his film The House That Jack Built screen out of competition.

They will also screen the Kevin Macdonald documentary about Whitney Houston, Whitney as part of their midnight screening schedule, along with the Michael B. Jordan and Michael Shannon-led redo of Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451.

The other big news is that Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote Will pay at the festival. It will be the festival’s closing film and will screen on Saturday 19th February. It will then get a release in France on the same day.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Cannes adds Lars von Trier latest, 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote', 'Whitney' doc

Cannes adds Lars von Trier latest, 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote', 'Whitney' doc
Ceylan, Dvortsevoy and Gonzalez films added to competition.

The Cannes Film Festival has announced several additions to its 2018 line-up, including the new Lars von Trier project, Terry Gilliam’s long-awaited The Man Who Killed Don Quixote and three new competition films.

Competition

Firstly Yann Gonzalez makes his competition debut with Un Couteau Dans Le Cœur (Knife + Heart) starring Vanessa Paradis

So does director Sergey Dvortsevoy with Ayka. His Tulpan won the Prize Un Certain Regard in 2008.

Nuri Bilge Ceylan, winner of the Palme d’or 2014 for Winter Sleep, returns with Ahlat Agaci (The Wild Pear Tree / Le Poirier Sauvage).

The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rushes. Cannes Announcements, Choi Eun-hee, Miloš Forman

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSJia Zhangke's Ash is Purest White.Just in case you missed it, the multiple lineups for the various festivals at Cannes this year have been announced. You can find all of the announcements on Notebook: the 71st Cannes Film Festival, Directors' Fortnight, Critics Week, and Acid. Additionally, Cannes has also announced the jury tending to the official selection: Cate Blanchett (President), Chang Chen, Ava DuVernay, Robert Guédiguian, Khadja Nin, Léa Seydoux, Kristen Stewart, Denis Villeneuve, and Andrey Zvyagintsev. After a truly eventful life (which includes being kidnapped by Kim Jong-il) and phenomenal career in cinema, the Korean screen legend Choi Eun-hee has died. Screen International provides a thorough obituary.Czech New Wave luminary and New Hollywood transplant Miloš Forman has died. Duane Byrge honors the man and artist with an obituary for The Hollywood Reporter.
See full article at MUBI »

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’
In the 1970s, Burt Reynolds was arguably the biggest movie star in the world. He had made his name through television, appearing as a regular for 50 episodes on the hit series “Gunsmoke,” then headlining his own series, “Hawk” and “Dan August.” But then Reynolds got his big break in feature films, co-starring in the John Boorman classic “Deliverance” (1972).

Though Reynolds was soon starring in such box-office hits as “The Longest Yard” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” he never abandoned television, utilizing such talk shows as “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” (where he was one of the funniest guests ever) to hone his image, strutting on as a sex symbol and then acting like an utter goofball once he sat the guest’s chair. The contrast between the Cosmopolitan centerfold and the delightful talk show guest endeared Reynolds to moviegoers.

In between his more serious films, such as 1979’s “Starting Over,
See full article at Gold Derby »

From Blow-Up to Bonnie and Clyde – why the 1960s is my favourite film decade

Rebellion against ‘le cinema de papa’ was the rallying cry of new waves worldwide in this golden era of studio-funded oddness

•Read the rest of My favourite film decade

The 1960s was when everything was shaken up and anything went. A new generation got their hands on cinema, and they took it to places it had never been before: out of the studios and into the streets; into inner consciousness and psychedelic realms; out into the cosmos and the future. They made what went before look square, Daddio.

It started with the French. Even in the mid-50s, François Truffaut was labelling the stuffy, classical studio fare that had gone before “le cinema de papa”. By the end of the decade, he and Jean-Luc Godard, among others, were ready to show the world the alternative. Their debuts, Truffaut’s The 400 Blows and Godard’s Breathless, were both made in 1959 (neither
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cannes Lineup Predictions: Will Women Directors Gain Ground?

Cannes Lineup Predictions: Will Women Directors Gain Ground?
Cannes kicks off nine days earlier this year, on May 8, but the official lineup announcement remains under wraps until April 12, which means the guessing games are already underway. Jake Gyllenhaal (“The Sisters Brothers”), Riley Keough (with three films in the mix), and Juliette Binoche are all expected to walk the red carpet, while directors Alfonso Cuarón (“Roma”), David Robert Mitchell (“Under the Silver Lake”), and Harmony Korine (“The Beach Bum”) are well positioned to screen in competition for the first time.

Half a century after the historic 1968 edition when Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and a generation of politically engaged French youth brought Cannes to a halt amid nationwide demonstrations, Europe’s most glamorous film festival once again finds itself at a crossroads. From the international success of “Wonder Woman,” which debuted five days after the festival last year, to the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements, the world is a much different
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Celebrating French cinema by Anne-Katrin Titze

Serge Toubiana‬ with Anne-Katrin Titze: "I've known Jeanne Balibar a long time. I know Tonie Marshall since 40 years, we are very close. Isabelle Huppert - I made a documentary on Isabelle Huppert in 2002."

Serge Toubiana, president of uniFrance, shared with me during the Rendez-Vous with French Cinema reception at the Film Society of Lincoln Center some background on the 25 exhibitions he organised when he was the director of the Cinémathèque Française. They included Tim Burton, Pedro Almodóvar, Dennis Hopper, Stanley Kubrick, François Truffaut, Jacques Demy, and the terrific opening installation in the new Cinémathèque building designed by Frank Gehry on Auguste Renoir and Jean Renoir - Renoir: Father and Son / Painting and Cinema.

Number One (Numéro Une) director Tonie Marshall Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

We discussed Isabelle Huppert's theatre work with Sarah Kane, his tribute to Mathieu Amalric, which filmmaker said yes because of Costa-Gavras, Georges Méliès and Paris, and how
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Foreplays #10: João César Monteiro's "Passeio com Johnny Guitar"

  • MUBI
Passeio com Johnny Guitar (“A Walk with Johnny Guitar”) conjures up a chapter in João César Monteiro’s own histoire(s) du cinéma. Occurring at that insomniac, delirious hour at which night gives way to day, this short film manages to travel a great distance in only three and a half minutes. Tracing the relations between sound and image, body and memory, gesture and affect, Monteiro unfolds a vast cinephiliac constellation that gravitates around one scene of Nicholas Ray’s Johnny Guitar (1954). *** A lanky old man, preceded by his cough, walks home alone. He smokes a cigarette and advances through a typical cobblestoned Lisboan street, biding good night to another solitary smoker. Installed in his head, the soundtrack of the most famous scene of Johnny Guitar—the re-encounter between Vienna (Joan Crawford) and Johnny (Sterling Hayden)—starts playing out. Viewers familiar with Monteiro’s œuvre know that this slightly hunched man,
See full article at MUBI »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel This March

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This March will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Friday, March 2

Friday Night Double Feature: The Ladykillers and La poison

Criminal schemes take unlikely targets in these two pitch-dark comedies from the 1950s. In Alexander Mackendrick’s Ealing Studio farce The Ladykillers (1955), a team of thieves (led by Alec Guinness) descends on a boardinghouse run by an elderly widow, who becomes the victim of their misdeeds. In Sacha Guitry’s brisk, witty, and savage La poison (1951), a gardener (Michel Simon) and his wife, fed up after thirty years of marriage, find themselves plotting each other’s murder.

Tuesday, March 6

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Art* and In
See full article at CriterionCast »

From Watchmen to Catch-22: can TV tackle 'unfilmable' books?

Film history is littered with adaptations that didn’t do their literary source material justice. But the small screen’s longer format could be the ideal place for unwieldy texts

In recent months, a spate of books has been adapted for TV, with Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and Dave Gibbons and Alan Moore’s Watchmen in varying stages of production. They share something in common: all have been made into films – none of which have worked. The film versions had prestige directors Mike Nichols (Catch-22) and François Truffaut (Fahrenheit 451), while Zach Snyder took on Watchmen with a $120m budget. But despite the big names with big budgets, they couldn’t quite pull it off.

Related: The bigger they come: how to film an 'unfilmable' book

Related: George Clooney returns to television for Catch-22, two decades after ER

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Drawn that way by Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Isao Takahata of Studio Ghibli: "He's very much into symbolism, metaphors and the subtle emotions." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The French Institute Alliance Française in New York in their latest CinéSalon series is honouring actresses who have won the César Award. Catherine Deneuve in François Truffaut's 10-César award-winning The Last Metro (Le Dernier Métro - introduced by Anne-Katrin Titze on February 13 at 4:00pm); Sandrine Bonnaire in Agnès Varda's Vagabond (Sans Toit Ni Loi), and Isabelle Huppert (Oscar-nominated for her performance) in Paul Verhoeven's Elle are the upcoming Best Actress: A César-Winner Showdown films to be shown.

Michaël Dudok de Wit with Anne-Katrin Titze on Lafcadio Hearn's Kwaidan: "It's basically fairy tales and ghost stories." Photo: Natascha Bodemann

Michaël Dudok de Wit's (César and Oscar-nominated and Cannes Film Festival Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize winner) debut feature The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Drawn that way by Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Isao Takahata of Studio Ghibli: "He's very much into symbolism, metaphors and the subtle emotions." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The French Institute Alliance Française in New York in their latest CinéSalon series is honouring actresses who have won the César Award. Catherine Deneuve in François Truffaut's 10-César award-winning The Last Metro (Le Dernier Métro - introduced by Anne-Katrin Titze on February 13 at 4:00pm); Sandrine Bonnaire in Agnès Varda's Vagabond (Sans Toit Ni Loi), and Isabelle Huppert (Oscar-nominated for her performance) in Paul Verhoeven's Elle are the upcoming Best Actress: A César-Winner Showdown films to be shown.

Michaël Dudok de Wit with Anne-Katrin Titze on Lafcadio Hearn's Kwaidan: "It's basically fairy tales and ghost stories." Photo: Natascha Bodemann

Michaël Dudok de Wit's (César and Oscar-nominated and Cannes Film Festival Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize winner) debut feature The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Have Your Say: What Is Your Favorite François Truffaut Film?

Today would have marked the 86th birthday of François Truffaut. Well, it actually still does, but the man himself died 32 years ago. A famous director, producer, writer, and occasional actor (see the still from Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind above), François Truffaut is considered one of the greatest French filmmakers of all time. And it's not just that Truffaut made great films, he loved the medium, and one of his most famous quotes is "When I first saw Citizen Kane, I was certain that never in my life had I loved a person the way I loved that film." A great scholar as well, his analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's films earned him the man's admiration, and Hitchcock even allowed Truffaut to...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Claude Autant-Lara: Four Romantic Escapes from Occupied France

Criterion’s Eclipse Series, an ever-expanding line of esoteric dvd releases, ensures that lesser known titles of important filmmakers remain available to the movie-loving public. They’ve just added another worthy edition to the mix with four films by French film director Claude Autant-Lara: Four Romantic Escapes from Occupied France. In keeping with the wallet-friendly nature of the series, the set contains no extras but features fine transfers, simple but elegant packaging and astute liner notes.

Claude Autant-Lara: Four Romantic Escapes from Occupied France

DVD

Eclipse

1942-46/ 1:33 / 103 Min., 92 min., 109 min., 98 min. / Street Date January 23, 2018

Starring Odette Joyeux, Marguerite Moreno, Jacques Tati

Cinematography by Philippe Agostini,

Written by Jean Aurenche, Pierre Bost

Music by Maurice Yvain, René Cloërec

Edited by Madeleine Gug

Produced by Pierre Guerlais

Directed by Claude Autant-Lara

In the late fifties, François Truffaut launched a diatribe against a select number of French directors with the phrase
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

New films showcased completely online at 2018 MyFrenchFilmFestival

French and Francophone films are set to be shown online as part of MyFrenchFilmFestival.

Available from 19 January to 19 February, the festival has been organised into six thematic sections with features and shorts offering a wide range of material. A mixture of new works playing alongside classic films such as Man Bites Dog and The Last Metro, the festival has built up a reputation for appealing to a fresh new audience.

There is a competitive element in the festival, with directors Paolo Sorrentino (The Great Beauty, Youth) and Julia Ducouranau (Raw) part of the filmmakers’s jury. There are also awards decided on by the press and the online viewing audience.

Here’s details of how the festival is shaping up.

What The F…Rench!?

Absurd and at times crazy situations featuring endearing heroes

Struggle for life, Antonin Peretjatko, Long feature in competition

Rock’n Roll, Guillaume Canet, Long feature in
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

An Architect's Gifts: Close-Up on Satoshi Kon's "Tokyo Godfathers" and "Paprika"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Satoshi Kon's Tokyo Godfathers (2003) is showing December 18, 2017 - January 17, 2018 and Paprika (2006) from December 19 - January 18, 2018 on Mubi in the United Kingdom in the retrospective Satoshi Kon, Anime Maestro. Tokyo GodfathersIt could be said that consistency and eclecticism make up two sides of the auteurist coin, in which the artist's voice can be seen and felt across a body of work that is either noticeably focused in subject matter, thematic concerns, or stylistic approaches (Alfred Hitchcock, François Truffaut, Wes Anderson) or wildly varied in any or all of those areas (Louis Malle, Steven Soderbergh). In that respect, Satoshi Kon got to have it both ways with the final two completed animated features in his oeuvre, the satisfyingly odd parting pairing of Tokyo Godfathers (2003) and Paprika (2006). Sorely missed these past seven years since his premature death from pancreatic cancer on
See full article at MUBI »

Women Directors From Europe on Their Foreign-Language Films

Women Directors From Europe on Their Foreign-Language Films
With a record 27 women behind the 92 foreign-language film submissions, Variety posed the same questions to a selection of directors about their experiences. What was your biggest obstacle in making the film? What was the key to your breakthrough? What is your creative goal? Who are your filmmaking heroes? What would you like the world to know about being a woman film director and the message you want to send? Here are their stories.

Anahit Abad

Yeva” (Armenia)

“Funding the project is the biggest obstacle, just like for most filmmakers who are trying to make their first film. Particularly, I can say that some of the most important obstacles I faced during the production of my film are being a woman, being of Armenian descent and of course, the fact that I am shorter than average.

“With all the financial obstacles, the fact that I was raised in the Iranian cinema and the location was somehow unfamiliar … I used
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A More Open System Is Needed to Fix Oscar’s Foreign-Language Problem (Opinion)

A More Open System Is Needed to Fix Oscar’s Foreign-Language Problem (Opinion)
It’s time for the Academy to change the way it awards foreign-language film.

This year, 92 distinct nations have selected and submitted what the Academy blindly accepts as each country’s best film to compete for the foreign-language Oscar. However magnanimous the Academy’s intent, that’s an overwhelming number of movies that now need to be divided up and screened by a dedicated subset of the membership in an imperfect process that results in a shortlist of nine movies, from which a separate committee will choose the final five nominees.

Ironically, while 92 is a record-setting number for this category, the year’s best foreign language film may not even be among them. That’s because the system — a squirrely, ever-evolving set of rules — is based on a pair of outdated premises.

First, the award was created in 1945 to raise awareness for foreign cinema at a time when overseas movies were either dubbed or ignored in the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Le Brio': Film Review

'Le Brio': Film Review
The inspirational teacher movie has never really been a staple of French cinema. From classics like Jean Vigo’s Zero for Conduct and Francois Truffaut’s The 400 Blows, which depicted schoolteachers as cruel taskmasters maintaining a draconian sense of order, to contemporary comic hits like Les Profs series, which depicts them as total idiots, there are few films that make you want to sit in a French classroom and learn.

Yet while there may be no Gallic equivalent to Dead Poets Society or Stand and Deliver, there have been a handful of uplifting school movies released over the past years, starting...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

A Critic’s Appreciation of Agnès Varda, New Wave’s Leading Lady

A Critic’s Appreciation of Agnès Varda, New Wave’s Leading Lady
In his book “The Judgment of Paris,” art historian Ross King points out that in the 1860s, France’s most esteemed artist was a man named Ernest Meissonier, a celebrated painter of horses and military tableaux whom few recall today. By contrast, many of the Impressionists whose genius we now celebrate were not properly recognized until after their deaths.

It’s a lesson worth remembering when thinking about contemporary cinema, in which pop entertainment earns instant praise, while the work most likely to endure a century from now a century from now goes relatively unrecognized in its time. French director Agnès Varda is the kind of filmmaker whose oeuvre is sure to stand the test of time — because it already has, holding up brilliantly since her 1955 feature debut, “La Pointe Courte,” about which Variety condescendingly wrote, “Main aspect of this film is that it was made for $20,000 by a 25-year-old girl.”

With her tiny seaside romance,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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