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Herman Wouk Dies: ‘The Winds Of War’ & ‘The Caine Mutiny’ Author Was 103

Herman Wouk Dies: ‘The Winds Of War’ & ‘The Caine Mutiny’ Author Was 103
Herman Wouk, who authored books that became legendary films and TV programs including The Caine Mutiny and The Winds of War, died today in his sleep in Palm Springs, the Associated Press reports. He was 103.

Wouk published about a dozen novels and a handful of plays and nonfiction books during a 70-year career, and many became landmark screen adaptations. His World War II novel The Winds of War hit bookstores in 1971 and was followed by the 1978 sequel War and Remembrance. Both were turned into smash ABC miniseries — with Winds of War airing in 1983 and War and Remembrance in 1988. Both starred Robert Mitchum as Capt. Victor “Pug” Henry and earned multiple Emmys.

Born on May 27, 1915 in the Bronx, Wouk — like so many other young Americans — join the Armed Forces after Pearl Harbor, serving in the Navy. He began writing while off watch aboard ship. And his best-known works chronicled seaman during
See full article at Deadline »

Herman Wouk, Author of ‘Caine Mutiny,’ ‘Winds of War,’ Dies at 103

  • Variety
Herman Wouk, Author of ‘Caine Mutiny,’ ‘Winds of War,’ Dies at 103
Herman Wouk, the author of novels adapted to the big and small screen, including “The Caine Mutiny,” “Marjorie Morningstar,” “The Winds of War” and “War and Remembrance,” has died. He was 103.

The Caine Mutiny,” a 1951 bestseller that won Wouk the Pulitzer Prize, was memorably adapted into the 1954 film starring Humphrey Bogart, who played the paranoid, mentally unstable captain of a Navy minesweeper whose actions drive his subordinates to mutiny. That pic, directed by Edward Dmytryk and also starring Jose Ferrer, Van Johnson and Fred MacMurray, drew seven Oscar nominations, including those for best picture and screenplay for Stanley Roberts.

Wouk relied upon his wartime experiences not only for “The Caine Mutiny,” but for his later novels “The Winds of War” (1971) and “War and Remembrance” (1978). These expansive works, which followed one character, Navy Commander Victor “Pug” Henry, through seemingly every important moment in WWII, were adapted into the highly successful ABC miniseries of the same name.
See full article at Variety »

I Am the Night: A Black Dahlia Primer

Tony Sokol Jan 26, 2019

I Am the Night exposes Dr. George Hodel, who was accused by his own son and granddaughter for being the Black Dahlia murderer.

I Am the Night tells the story of the characters who surround one of Hollywood's most famous homicides, and certainly the city of Los Angeles' longest and most infamous cold case: the Black Dahlia murder. TNT's new miniseries, directed by Patty Jenkins (Wonder Woman), gets some facts right, fudges others for dramatic continuity, and smashes a few to pulp. At one point in I Am the Night, investigative reporter Jay Singletary, played by Chris Pine, picks up a graphic compilation of tabloid news on the case to catch up on what's he's missed since covering it last. The grotesque unsolved homicide had grown to iconic status.

Actress Elizabeth Short was 22 years old when her body was found in a vacant lot on Norton
See full article at Den of Geek »

Kim Basinger Related To Beauty Hurdles Of Oscar Winning ‘La Confidential’ Role

For playing the role of Lynn Bracken, a call girl made to look like actress Veronica Lake, L.A. Confidential’s Kim Basinger won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. During the interviews for L.A. Confidential, Basinger admitted she could relate to the image versus reality world that surrounded Bracken.

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” said [...]

The post Kim Basinger Related To Beauty Hurdles Of Oscar Winning ‘La Confidential’ Role appeared first on Hollywood Outbreak.
See full article at Hollywood Outbreak »

Podcast: Smackdown '43 Companion

Nathaniel R welcomes the panel Yaseen Ali (cinephile), Kristen Lopez (critic), Rebecca Pahle (critic) and Kieran Scarlett (screenwriter) to discuss 1943 at the movies with recommended favorites and our favorite switch-the-actresses around game. We had previously reviewed the supporting actress nominees.

We talk about the three actresses in Ww II women's picture So Proudly We Hail. The running time slog of For Whom the Bell Tolls which doesn't showcase Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman well, the hit play turned message movie Watch on the Rhine and its place as a "homefront" movie when the war barely touched our soil, and religious epic The Song of Bernadette which won Jennifer Jones the Best Actress Oscar. 

You can listen to the 1 hour podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunes. Continue the conversations in the comments, won't you? 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actress went to a wide swath of talented actresses in the 1990s, including Whoopi Goldberg, Marisa Tomei, Anna Paquin, Judi Dench and Angelina Jolie. A surprising amount of comedic performances won this category in the ’90s, especially for an academy that typically prefers drama. Which Best Supporting Actress winner is your favorite?

Check back on all the former champs and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actress.)

Whoopi Goldberg, “Ghost” (1990) — Whoopi Goldberg became the second black actress to win an Oscar thanks to her scene-stealing role as scheming psychic Oda Mae Brown in “Ghost.” She was previously nominated in Best Actress for “The Color Purple” (1985). Goldberg is one of only 12 individuals to have won the Egot, a.k.a. the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Blu-ray Review – L.A. Confidential: 20th Anniversary Edition

L.A. Confidential, 1997.

Directed by Curtis Hanson.

Starring Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, James Cromwell, David Strathairn, Kim Basinger, and Danny DeVito.

Synopsis:

L.A. Confidential has been reissued on DVD and Blu-ray for its 20th anniversary. Unfortunately, nothing new was created for this release, so owners of the 2008 Blu-ray can skip this one, although those who have the earlier two-disc DVD Special Edition may want to upgrade to a high-def copy of the movie. A code for a digital copy is included too.

L.A. Confidential is one of those movies that bears repeat viewings. While its story of three La police officers gradually uncovering deep-rooted corruption may seem simple on its surface, the plot adds the complexities of Hollywood’s seedy underside to the proceedings. Set in any other city, it might be a more straightforward narrative, but La’s mystique gives the story another layer for viewers to navigate.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Preacher Season 2 Episode 3 Review – ‘Damsels’

Martin Carr reviews the third episode of Preacher season 2…

Back stories for pivotal characters are not known for containing the following elements. Teen suicide, chocolate box teen suicides or shotgun blasts to the head repeated on loop. Then we hit the implied underage sodomy issue which is likely to put one or two noses out of joint. Honestly there is no way this makes it to primetime before nine o’clock, not for any terrestrially financed television network I know of. Which is probably for the best since Amazon Prime kicked down the door, left it hanging off those hinges and flapping in a wind of change. Preacher it seems is not above lowering the tone.

There is a distinct film noir tinge this week and New Orleans really needs no window dressing, as dive bar jazz clubs ooze charisma and Jesse drifts between them in search of inspiration. Aside
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ed Catto: The Cutie & the Indefatigable Entrepreneur

I’ve listened to many podcasts during the long upstate winter and one of my favorites has been Karina Longworth’s You Must Remember This. It’s billed as a storytelling podcast exploring the secret and/or forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. I enjoy it because Longworth spins great yarns, with vivid insights, about Hollywood stars and their careers.

But I think there’s more to why it’s popular and why I enjoy it so much. I’m starting to realize that the inevitable ups and downs of yesteryear’s Hollywood Stars are analogous to the rollercoaster rides that categorize so many of today’s careers.

It’s astounding to hear about how a legendary star’s career might have floundered at one point, only to do a complete 360 as he or she gets cast in a successful blockbuster movie. Thundering successes and crushing failures become the
See full article at Comicmix »

Ed Catto: The Cutie & the Indefatigable Entrepreneur

I’ve listened to many podcasts during the long upstate winter and one of my favorites has been Karina Longworth’s You Must Remember This. It’s billed as a storytelling podcast exploring the secret and/or forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. I enjoy it because Longworth spins great yarns, with vivid insights, about Hollywood stars and their careers.

But I think there’s more to why it’s popular and why I enjoy it so much. I’m starting to realize that the inevitable ups and downs of yesteryear’s Hollywood Stars are analogous to the rollercoaster rides that categorize so many of today’s careers.

It’s astounding to hear about how a legendary star’s career might have floundered at one point, only to do a complete 360 as he or she gets cast in a successful blockbuster movie. Thundering successes and crushing failures become the
See full article at Comicmix »

12 Tips for Choosing a Wedding Hairstyle You’ll Love Forever

12 Tips for Choosing a Wedding Hairstyle You’ll Love Forever
You’ve already found “the one,” picked out your dress and even chose your wedding bands. The hard part is almost over — but you still need to decide on the perfect hairstyle to wear on the big day. Up or down? Straight or wavy? Braid or no braid? In order to help answer those pressing questions, we turned to celebrity hairstylist and Kérastase brand ambassador Matt Fugate, who shared his foolproof tips for scoring a style that you’ll love as much as you love your new spouse.

1. Figure out your vibe

Before you speak with your hairstylist, Fugate recommends
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sunset in the West

This charming Roy Rogers oater could reboot interest in vintage ‘series’ westerns. Basically a film for little kids, it’s earnestly played by all concerned and director William Witney’s direction sparkles. The added filip that makes the difference is the beautifully restored Trucolor image — Roy’s wonder horse Trigger is indeed magnificent. I listened carefully, but I don’t think Roy actually says, “Yippie-ki-yay, M_____f____r.”

Sunset in the West

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1950 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 67 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 19.95

Starring: Roy Rogers, Trigger, Estelita Rodriguez, Penny Edwards, Gordon Jones, Will Wright, Pierre Watkin, Charles La Torre, William Tannen, Gaylord Pendleton, Paul E. Burns, Dorothy Ann White, Riders of the Purple Sage.

Cinematography: Jack Marta

Color by Trucolor

Film Editor: Tony Martinelli

Original Music: R. Dale Butts

Special Effects: Howard & Theodore Lydecker

Written by Gerald Geraghty

Produced by Edward J. White

Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Seddok, L’erede di Satana (Atom Age Vampire)

Seddok, l’erede di Satana (Atom Age Vampire)

Region 2 Pal DVD

Terminal Video Italia Srl

1960 / B&W / 1:66 flat letterbox / 103 min. / Street Date June 12, 2011 / available through Amazon.it / Eur 6,64

Starring: Alberto Lupo, Ivo Garrani, Susanne Loret, Sergio Fantoni, Rina Franchetti, Franca Parisi, Roberto Bertea.

Cinematography: Aldo Giordani

Film Editor: Gabrielle Varriale

Makeup Effects: Euclide Santoli

Original Music: Armando Trovajoli

Written by: Gino De Santis, Alberto Bevilacqua, Anton Giulio Majano; story by Piero Monviso

Produced by: Elio Ippolito Mellino (as Mario Fava)

Directed by Anton Giulio Majano

Let me herewith take a break from new discs to review an Italian release from six years ago, a movie that for years we knew only as Atom Age Vampire. Until sporadic late- night TV showings appeared, it existed for us ’60s kids as one or two interesting photos in Famous Monsters magazine. Forry Ackerman steered away from adult films, with the effect that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ed Catto: Frank Robbins

When I was a kid I’d make the trek to Lewis’ Drug Store to buy comics with my allowance money. Maxwell’s Food Store had a better selection, but that was on the other side of the treacherous “Five Points” intersection, and I wasn’t yet allowed to cross that on my own.

Detective Comics, starring Batman, was a favorite, and you can make a case that some of the very best Batman stories were appearing each month during that early 70s period. They were fantastic thrillers by Denny O’Neil, Neal Adams, Irv Novick, with the occasional Michael Kaluta or Bernie Wrightson cover. I didn’t know how good I had it.

So you can imagine my surprise when I picked up Detective Comics #429 and looked at the interior story’s artwork by Frank Robbins. I remember thinking “Is this a joke?” and “Is this a Golden Age reprint?
See full article at Comicmix »

Curtis Hanson obituary

Director, producer and screenwriter who won an Oscar for the film adaptation of La Confidential

To get a measure of the wide range of themes and genres covered by the film director Curtis Hanson, who has died aged 71, one need only compare his greatest critical success, La Confidential (1997), with his biggest commercial hit, 8 Mile (2002). The former is a stylish, 1950s-set noir thriller shot through with ambivalence about Hollywood, which is shown in all its dreamy allure and soul-crushing horror. The latter picture is a semi-gritty star vehicle for the rapper Eminem (Aka Marshall Mathers III) which draws on the performer’s own background in its story of a young man who uses hip-hop to escape his insalubrious trailer-park origins.

La Confidential was acclaimed by critics who had believed they did not make them like that any more; Hanson and his co-writer, Brian Helgeland, won an Oscar for their assured adaptation
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

"Alan Ladd: The 1940S Collection" DVD Release From Turner Classic Movies

  • CinemaRetro
Turner Classic Movies has released three Alan Ladd titles in a set titled "Alan Ladd: The 1940s Collection". Here is the official press release:

Handsome leading man Alan Ladd found success in the 1940s and ‘50s, first as the tough guy in several films noir co-starring Veronica Lake and then as the stoic hero in Westerns such as Shane (1953). Turner Classic Movies and Universal are proud to present this three-film collection that showcases Ladd’s talents in a range of genres from thriller to adventure, as well as the work of such directors as Irving Pichel and Frank Tuttle, and writers the likes of Richard Maibaum and Seton I. Miller. Lucky Jordan (1942) Directed by Frank Tuttle (who also directed Ladd’s breakthrough film This Gun for Hire the same year), Lucky Jordan stars Ladd as a racketeer who gets drafted into the Us Army and will do anything to
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Burned at the Stake: Cinematic Witchcraft Through the Ages

Life isn’t easy for witches. Sure, they have magical powers, live for hundreds of years, and can fly around on broomsticks — but it’s not all fun and games. Beyond the stinging social stigma attached to those who witch for a living, there’s also the constant threat of unruly villagers brandishing torches and pitchforks, hungry for a good old-fashioned witch-burning. It’s starkly amusing to recall that the archetypal witch caricature was born out of the cold-blooded, unlawful murder of innocent people, acts committed vainly in the name of religion. On film, the witch is prolific, with countless examples dating back to the dawn of the art form.

When examining the witch film genre, mounting similarities cannot be ignored. Some employ the witch in fairy tales, macabre bedtime stories intended to evoke fear and wonderment in equal measure. Others depict a society gone mad, fingers ever pointed at
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Largely Forgotten, Frequent Cagney Partner Remembered on TCM

Pat O'Brien movies on TCM: 'The Front Page,' 'Oil for the Lamps of China' Remember Pat O'Brien? In case you don't, you're not alone despite the fact that O'Brien was featured – in both large and small roles – in about 100 films, from the dawn of the sound era to 1981. That in addition to nearly 50 television appearances, from the early '50s to the early '80s. Never a top star or a critics' favorite, O'Brien was nevertheless one of the busiest Hollywood leading men – and second leads – of the 1930s. In that decade alone, mostly at Warner Bros., he was seen in nearly 60 films, from Bs (Hell's House, The Final Edition) to classics (American Madness, Angels with Dirty Faces). Turner Classic Movies is showing nine of those today, Nov. 11, '15, in honor of what would have been the Milwaukee-born O'Brien's 116th birthday. Pat O'Brien and James Cagney Spencer Tracy had Katharine Hepburn.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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