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‘Pete The Cat’: Trailer & Premiere Date For Amazon Toon Series Starring Jacob Tremblay

‘Pete The Cat’: Trailer & Premiere Date For Amazon Toon Series Starring Jacob Tremblay
Kids and parents have read about his new shoes and his groovy buttons, now Pete the Cat is coming to life in a new animated series. Amazon Studios today set a September 21 premiere date and released the first trailer for the show starring Jacob Tremblay as the voice of kidlit’s cool blue feline. Check it out above, along with the key art below.

Pete the Cat features original music from Grammy-winning spouses Elvis Costello and Diana Krall, who also voice Pete’s parents. Jessica Biel, Atticus Shaffer and musician KT Tunstall also star in the music-driven series about exploring your world and trying new things while being smart, accepting, and optimistic.

Season 1 of Pete the Cat highlights themes of self-discovery. Pete stays cool as he tries new things, sets out for picture day, writes his first song, learns to surf and even has his first performance for his band.
See full article at Deadline »

‘Eighth Grade’ Is the First Movie to Nail Youth Culture in the Digital Age

‘Eighth Grade’ Is the First Movie to Nail Youth Culture in the Digital Age
I keep reading that “Eighth Grade,” Bo Burnham’s captivating drama about a shy but intensely aware girl named Kayla (Elsie Fisher), who’s doing all she can to navigate her final week of middle school, is a movie that’s universal and eternal — one that captures the age-old zone of pimply bashful awkwardness that defines the moment of growing up, the moment when kids are teetering on the fault line between innocence and experience, childish dreaming and social networking, their identities stranded between two worlds. I don’t disagree with the praise; the movie is a minor marvel. Yet the bracing quality of “Eighth Grade,” the one that makes it pinpoint and artful, can’t necessarily be reduced to a common rite of passage that We Can All Relate To. A lot of folks who are showering the film with accolades sound like they want to feel younger than they are.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Eighth Grade’ Is the First Movie to Nail Youth Culture in the Digital Age

  • Variety
‘Eighth Grade’ Is the First Movie to Nail Youth Culture in the Digital Age
I keep reading that “Eighth Grade,” Bo Burnham’s captivating drama about a shy but intensely aware girl named Kayla (Elsie Fisher), who’s doing all she can to navigate her final week of middle school, is a movie that’s universal and eternal — one that captures the age-old zone of pimply bashful awkwardness that defines the moment of growing up, the moment when kids are teetering on the fault line between innocence and experience, childish dreaming and social networking, their identities stranded between two worlds. I don’t disagree with the praise; the movie is a minor marvel. Yet the bracing quality of “Eighth Grade,” the one that makes it pinpoint and artful, can’t necessarily be reduced to a common rite of passage that We Can All Relate To. A lot of folks who are showering the film with accolades sound like they want to feel younger than they are.
See full article at Variety »

Deathstroke Actor Joe Manganiello Auditioned To Play Spider-Man

Joe Manganiello is one of the few actors who’s managed to play supporting antagonists in both Marvel and DC movies. Recently, folks saw him debut as Deathstroke in the post-credits scene of Justice League, a role that he’ll hopefully follow up in his own solo film from director Gareth Evans. For his Marvel work, however, we have to rewind back to 2002 when he played Peter Parker’s high school nemesis Flash Thompson in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man.

While speaking with Kevin Smith for IMDb at San Diego Comic-Con, Manganiello reminisced about his part in the wall-crawler’s debut cinematic outing, revealing that it was his first ever movie role. The actor revealed that he got the job by screen testing opposite James Franco, who went on to play Harry Osborn but at this point was auditioning for the title role.

“[Spider-Man] was my first role. When I moved to La,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Film Review: Timothée Chalamet in ‘Hot Summer Nights’

Film Review: Timothée Chalamet in ‘Hot Summer Nights’
Imagine a wistful hooking-up-on-the-boardwalk coming-of-age film, set on Cape Cod during the long hot summer of 1991, starring Timothée Chamalet in a variation on the passively precocious owl-eyed dreamer he played in “Call Me by Your Name.” Now imagine a scuzzy underworld drama that takes that same Chalamet character, in all his hooded sensual innocence, and turns him into a pot-dealing version of Mark Wahlberg in “Boogie Nights”: a cold hard opportunist who gets hooked on the life.

Put them together and you have “Hot Summer Nights,” a weirdly “romantic” drug drama that wastes no time burning plausibility to the ground. Yet even when it does, the actors keep it alive (sort of). Still, you can’t stop wondering if the first-time writer-director, Elijah Bynum, who has a talent for atmosphere, meant for us to actually take the story on the level. If so, it was a miscalculation. He has
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: Timothée Chalamet in ‘Hot Summer Nights’

  • Variety
Film Review: Timothée Chalamet in ‘Hot Summer Nights’
Imagine a wistful hooking-up-on-the-boardwalk coming-of-age film, set on Cape Cod during the long hot summer of 1991, starring Timothée Chamalet in a variation on the passively precocious owl-eyed dreamer he played in “Call Me by Your Name.” Now imagine a scuzzy underworld drama that takes that same Chalamet character, in all his hooded sensual innocence, and turns him into a pot-dealing version of Mark Wahlberg in “Boogie Nights”: a cold hard opportunist who gets hooked on the life.

Put them together and you have “Hot Summer Nights,” a weirdly “romantic” drug drama that wastes no time burning plausibility to the ground. Yet even when it does, the actors keep it alive (sort of). Still, you can’t stop wondering if the first-time writer-director, Elijah Bynum, who has a talent for atmosphere, meant for us to actually take the story on the level. If so, it was a miscalculation. He has
See full article at Variety »

‘Hot Summer Nights’ Film Review: Timothée Chalamet Sweats Through Derivative Potboiler

‘Hot Summer Nights’ Film Review: Timothée Chalamet Sweats Through Derivative Potboiler
A playlist in search of a movie, the teen melodrama “Hot Summer Nights” flips through its atmospheric, music-saturated visuals with the confidence of a carnival barker, but very quickly the pileup of influences, postures, and tones makes for more of a hot mess than a sweltering good time.

The debut feature of writer-director Elijah Bynum, “Hot Summer Nights” carries that unmistakable first-film vibe of breathless assurance combined with wince-worthy sense of direction, in which the pointing out of movie references becomes the only noteworthy constellation in a superficial coming-of-age yarn.

Bynum wants so badly for you to feel the full force of his brooding, violent, sex-drenched vision of a momentous Cape Cod summer, whereby a James Dean-esque story of the young, wounded and beautiful can be made without Dean. But also — unintentionally — without the coalescing, original psychological insight through which Dean became Dean.

Watch Video: Timothée Chalamet Returns to
See full article at The Wrap »

How Bruce Lee’s Star Rose in the U.S. After His Death

July 20 marks the 45th anniversary of the death of Bruce Lee, who had one of the briefest and most remarkable careers in Hollywood history. On July 23, 1973, Variety ran his 300-word obituary on page 7. He didn’t get star treatment because he wasn’t yet a star, at least in the English-speaking world. As Matthew Polly points out in his excellent new bio “Bruce Lee: A Life” (Simon & Schuster), Lee had a career in Asia as a child actor, a dancer (he won Hong Kong’s 1958 Cha-Cha Dance Championship with little brother Robert), a young star (nicknamed “Little Dragon” by his fans) and then a martial-arts practitioner and innovator. The rest of the world discovered him when “Enter the Dragon” opened in 1973, just one month after he died suddenly at age 32 of a brain aneurysm. Variety reviewer Whitney Williams enthused, “Lee socks over a performance seldom equaled in action (movies).” His charisma,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Bruce Lee’s Star Rose in the U.S. After His Death

July 20 marks the 45th anniversary of the death of Bruce Lee, who had one of the briefest and most remarkable careers in Hollywood history. On July 23, 1973, Variety ran his 300-word obituary on page 7. He didn’t get star treatment because he wasn’t yet a star, at least in the English-speaking world. As Matthew Polly points out in his excellent new bio “Bruce Lee: A Life” (Simon & Schuster), Lee had a career in Asia as a child actor, a dancer (he won Hong Kong’s 1958 Cha-Cha Dance Championship with little brother Robert), a young star (nicknamed “Little Dragon” by his fans) and then a martial-arts practitioner and innovator. The rest of the world discovered him when “Enter the Dragon” opened in 1973, just one month after he died suddenly at age 32 of a brain aneurysm. Variety reviewer Whitney Williams enthused, “Lee socks over a performance seldom equaled in action (movies).” His charisma,
See full article at Variety »

The Side of Steve McQueen, Hollywood's King of Cool, You Don't Know (Exclusive)

The King of Cool is certainly not a new concept in Hollywood. We've seen it used in reference to Marlon Brando (Streetcar Named Desire—era), Clint Eastwood (still kickin' it so many decades later), and, of course, the late James Dean. But you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who has held onto that mantle longer than Steve McQueen. And this despite the fact he's been gone for nearly 40 years and that his first leading man role was in a movie called The Blob. The natural question to ask is why? What was it about Steve McQueen that has stood him apart from virtually everyone? Journalist/author Marshall Terrill is the guy who probably knows McQueen better than anyone without actually knowing him. He has either written or co-written half-a-dozen biographical books on the subject, with another half dozen on the way. "There is such a need for McQueen," he exclusively tells Closer.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Remembering Tab Hunter

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Remembering Tab Hunter
"In life we have to be contributors," Tab Hunter, the legendary star of Hollywood's Golden Age, said when we sat down at the offices of The Hollywood Reporter in March 2015 to record an interview. "It's very, very important. And I look up there and I think I've contributed." Indeed, he did. Hunter, who died July 8, just three days shy of his 87th birthday, is being remembered not only for the work that he did during the waning days of the studio system — he, James Dean and Natalie Wood were the last three actors put ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Tab Hunter’s Trials and Tribulations: 7 Things We Learned From the Late Gay Heartthrob’s Netflix Documentary

Tab Hunter’s Trials and Tribulations: 7 Things We Learned From the Late Gay Heartthrob’s Netflix Documentary
With his blonde hair and all-American good looks, Tab Hunter was the picture of a 1950s heartthrob. At the height of his career, he made waves as a wholesome boy next door in films like “Battle Cry” (1955), “The Burning Hills” (1956) with Natalie Wood, and “Damn Yankees” (1958). He enjoyed a short career resurgence in the ’80s, after playing Divine’s love interest in John Waters’ “Polyester” (1981). On Monday, July 9, a Facebook post announced that Hunter had died. He was 86.

Hunter wrote candidly about his life as a closeted man in Hollywood in a 2005 memoir “Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star,” including his relationships with Olympic figure skater Ronnie Roberston and “Psycho” star Anthony Perkins. Their romance is the subject of a film from J.J. Abrams and Zachary Quinto in the early stages of development at Paramount, tentatively titled “Tab & Tony.” Hunter’s memoir was adapted into a documentary in 2015, directed by Jeffrey Schwarz.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Hot Summer Nights’ Review: Timothée Chalamet Stars in His Own Stale ‘Adventureland’

Coming of age is a constant negotiation between who you are and who you’re not — it’s the most intense period of a process that will last for the rest of your life. Coming-of-age movies naturally tend to dramatize that negotiation, which is why so many of them hinge on hollowed out Harry Potter types who become the most boring characters in their own stories: It’s easier to paint on a portrait on a blank slate, easier to keep score of what someone is adding to (or subtracting from) themselves when you start from scratch. The only problem with that approach is that it strands a lot of very similar teenagers in films about how they’re not like everyone else.

It’s a trap that’s endemic to its genre, and one that “Hot Summer Nights” tries to avoid in fascinating and disastrous fashion: Here’s a
See full article at Indiewire »

Georgann Johnson Dead at 91

Georgann Johnson, best known for her roles on TV and Broadway, died on June 4. She was 91.

The actress died in Los Angeles, daughter Carol Prager announced in the obituary section of the Los Angeles Times.

Johnson was born on August 15, 1926, in Decorah, Iowa, and worked as a character actress in more than 115 films and TV series including Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Too Close For Comfort and Archie Bunker’s Place.

It was in the 1953 Broadway revival of "Room Service" that Johnson met actor and future husband, Stanley Prager. After Prager's death in 1972, she was married to Honorable Jack Tenner, a Superior Court Judge and civil rights activist, until his death in 2008.

Other notable credits included Life Sentence (1953) opposite James Dean, Bang the Drum Slowly (1956) opposite Paul Newman and Midnight Cowboy (1969), which won the Oscar for Best Picture.

Johnson also appeared in Three's Company as John Ritter's mother in 1983.

On daytime soap operas,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Antoni Porowski Is Opening His Own Restaurant — and 'Queer Eye' Fans Are Ready for All the Avocado

This is not a drill. Antoni Porowski, our favorite guacamole aficionado on Queer Eye, is opening his own restaurant in NYC. The Canadian chef revealed he is working on a fast-casual concept and Can You Believe, he did not mention avocado once. "I’m all about like cheese and pork belly and decadence, and as a result of the increased vanity of being on camera all the time and working out and eating healthy, I’m developing a fast-casual food concept restaurant that I’m gonna be opening here in New York," he said during a panel on June 19. He also opened up about his experience in the food industry, adding, "I was a busboy, a waiter, a manager, a sommelier... like...all of it from a family-run Polish restaurant, with like grandmas in the basement hand-making pierogies, to working at Bond Street for a while. I’ve done it all.
See full article at Life and Style »

The Tale of the Passenger: Affonso Uchoa Discusses "Araby"

Since its premiere in the International Film Festival Rotterdam’s Hivos Tiger competition in 2017, Affonso Uchoa and João Dumans’ Araby has become a sleeper festival hit, welcomed at prestigious series such as New Directors/New Films, Fid Marseille, Karlovy Vary, Viennale, San Sebastian, London and Bafici. Focusing on the life experiences of a journeyman laborer (Aristides de Sousa) in the inland states of Brazil as seen through his own autobiographical journal, it’s another small, unassuming jewel in the current outpouring of great cinema from that country; a look at the daily lives of the rural and suburban disenfranchised that inspire so many of these directors interested in telling real stories of the real country. But Dumans and Uchoa, while solidly anchored in a (reasonably conventional) narrative, also borrow from the playbook of documentary, with a non-professional cast enacting scenes from everyday life that are not a million miles away from their own hard-scrabble existence.
See full article at MUBI »

‘Midnight Cowboy’ Actress Georgann Johnson Dies at 91

  • Variety
‘Midnight Cowboy’ Actress Georgann Johnson Dies at 91
Midnight Cowboy” actress Georgann Johnson died June 4 in Los Angeles. She was 91.

With a career spanning six decades, the Iowa native first appeared on television in 1950s commercials, later appearing opposite James Dean in TV drama “Life Sentence” (1953).

Johnson’s live TV performances include the original production of “Bang the Drum Slowly” (1956) with Paul Newman as well as playing Tony Randall’s wife in “Mr. Peepers” from 1952 to 1955.

The actress recalled: “It was a terribly good and terribly funny show and yet very gentle. I realized how much a special thing it was at the time.”

Her dream of singing in a Big Band came to fruition in Steve Allen’s “Songs for Sale” (1950-1952), a talent show for aspiring songwriters. Peggy Lee performed Johnson’s song, which won the prize and made an impression on Allen. He later cast her in the live television musical “The Bachelor.” In 1954, Johnson
See full article at Variety »

Georgann Johnson, Actress on 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,' Dies at 91

Georgann Johnson, Actress on 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,' Dies at 91
Georgann Johnson, the veteran film, television and Broadway actress who portrayed the mother of Jane Seymour's character on Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, died June 4 in Los Angeles, daughter Carol Prager announced. She was 91.

Johnson, who spent 60 years in show business, had another regular role as the title character's mom on an earlier CBS drama, The Trials of Rosie O'Neill, starring Sharon Gless, and she played Jack Tripper's (John Ritter) mother on an episode of ABC's Three's Company.

In the 1950s, the Iowa native worked alongside James Dean and Paul Newman on the anthology ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Son of France: Tiff Programmer Brad Deane on the Cinema of Gérard Blain

Gérard Blain in Jusqu'au bout de la nuitPossibly the most exciting retrospective to hit Toronto so far this year, at least judging by the merits of rarity, “Rebel Without a Cause: The Cinema of Gérard Blain” will offer a glimpse into a still deeply mysterious figure of French cinema. Blain, who died in 2000, is an icon who’s near sixty-year long filmography began with being one of the nation’s most sought-after actors (going as far as to being dubbed “the French James Dean”) and soon pivoted to directing uncompromising dramas that drew comparisons to Robert Bresson. While his two best known directorial efforts, Le pélican (1974) and A Child in the Crown (1976), had been respective carte blanche programming choices of Olivier Assayas and Mia Hansen-Løve in previous Tiff seasons, Gérard Blain’s work as a director remains wholly underseen in North America and much of Europe. That’s why this series is definitely an event,
See full article at MUBI »

J.K. Simmons, Edie Falco Reflect on When They Stopped Having to Wait Tables

  • Variety
J.K. Simmons, Edie Falco Reflect on When They Stopped Having to Wait Tables
J.K. Simmons (“Counterpart”) and Edie Falco (“Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders”) sat down for a chat for Variety’s “Actors on Actors” presented by Shutterstock. The full interviews will air in two episodes on PBS SoCal Koce, the first on Tuesday, June 19 at 7 p.m. and the second on Thursday, June 21 at 7 p.m. Click here for more “Actors on Actors.”

Edie Falco: What interested you in the role in “Counterpart”? And what scared you?

J.K. Simmons: I was first interested just reading the script, and then on about page 20 I started getting scared. The first 20 pages is just about this guy Howard who’s kind of a sad sack and a lowly cog in this weird sort of Fritz Lang monolithic government bureaucracy. And then the big reveal is, oh, by the way, there’s a parallel universe, and there are two versions of this guy.
See full article at Variety »
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