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Wes Anderson’s ‘The French Dispatch’ Adds Lois Smith (Exclusive)

Wes Anderson’s ‘The French Dispatch’ Adds Lois Smith (Exclusive)
Lois Smith has joined the cast of Wes Anderson’s “The French Dispatch,” Variety has learned.

It continues a late-career resurgence for the 88-year-old stage and screen actress. Smith was nominated for a Gotham and Independent Spirit Award for her work in last year’s “Marjorie Prime,” a role that garnered her some of the best reviews of her career. She also appeared in the Oscar-nominated “Lady Bird.”

Smith will play an unspecified supporting role and joins an ensemble that includes Bill Murray, Tilda Swinton, Frances McDormand, Benicio del Toro, Jeffrey Wright, and her “Lady Bird” co-star Timothee Chalamet. Filming is reportedly already underway.

The French Dispatch” is set in Paris during the 1950s and follows a group of journalists at an American newspaper bureau. Anderson will write and direct the movie, which is his first live-action film since 2014’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” Scott Rudin will produce the movie.
See full article at Variety »

Darren Criss could join another ‘youngest ever’ list with a Golden Globe victory for ‘Versace’

Darren Criss could join another ‘youngest ever’ list with a Golden Globe victory for ‘Versace’
After becoming the second youngest Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor Emmy winner in September, Darren Criss could join another youngest list at the Golden Globes. The 31-year-old would be the third youngest champ in the corresponding Globe category if he prevails for “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.”

Much like the Emmy category, Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor at the Globes, which was first awarded in 1982, is dominated by older thespians. Only two people have won in their 20s: James Franco, the category’s youngest winner at 23 when he won for “James Dean” in 2002, and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, who was 28 during his victory for “Elvis” in 2006.

See Darren Criss (‘Versace’) could easily sweep the Golden Globe and SAG after killer Emmy win

Criss would be the 10th person in their 30s to take home the prize and would knock back Anthony Andrews (“Brideshead Revisited”), who turned
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: ‘Never Look Away’ is a Novelistic Return to Form for Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck

One of the biggest challenges when making a film about a fictitious artist must be coming up with art that doesn’t make audience members question the admiration for the artist. In that sense, writer/director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck covers his bases by using Gerhard Richter’s photorealistic pieces as the inspiration for the work created by Kurt Barnert (Tom Schilling), the protagonist of Never Look Away. So by the time a frustrated Kurt realizes he can turn painful memories into haunting paintings that see beyond the “reality” of a photograph, we are so immersed in his story that unexpected chills are the only possible reaction we can have upon seeing his first completed piece.

The other challenge of a quasi-biopic must certainly be writing a backstory plotty enough to feel novelistic, but subtle enough to feel as random and unplanned as real life, so that the more cynical
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Blob’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Steve McQueen, Aneta Corsaut, Earl Rowe, Stephen Chase, John Benson, Olin Howland | Written by Theodore Simonson, Kay Linaker | Directed by Irvin S. Yeaworth Jr

Alongside The Fly and The Thing, Chuck Russell’s remake of The Blob was the third in the Holy Trinity of 1980s cover versions of 1950s sci-fi horror. Like David Cronenberg’s and John Carpenter’s films, it improved upon the original work in virtually every way.

If you’re familiar with the Frank Darabont-scripted schlocker, you’ll be aware from the first note of the ridiculously jaunty “Beware of the Blob” theme song that we are dealing with a very different amorphous beast with this, the 1958 original.

I’m a sucker for movies set over a single night, as well as small town settings, and here we have both. It’s Pennsylvania, and Steve (Steve McQueen) is at a kissing spot with his
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Richard Madden: Don’t Expect Me to Play Bond Just Because of ‘Bodyguard’

  • Indiewire
Richard Madden: Don’t Expect Me to Play Bond Just Because of ‘Bodyguard’
After three seasons as Robb Stark on “Game of Thrones,” you might expect Richard Madden to aim for lighter fare. Instead, he’s the titular “Bodyguard,” the UK series that shattered ratings records during its initial run on BBC One, and has now found international success via (what else) Netflix.

As David Budd, the specialized protection officer tasked with protecting Home Secretary Julia Montague (Keeley Hawes), the Scottish actor with the James Dean face is now a rumored contender to take over the role of James Bond. Both Budd and Bond are lawmen of few words. However, Madden said he considers the iconic British spy to be of another world altogether.

Yes Ma'am. #Bodyguard @_richardmadden pic.twitter.com/FvewPoxLLo

— BBC One (@BBCOne) September 7, 2018

“I think that they’re completely different characters,” he said. “It’s a totally different beast. They’re two different things.”

To his mind, one of the
See full article at Indiewire »

Eric Roth on What He Learned From William Goldman: ‘Take the Reader by the Heart’

  • Variety
Eric Roth on What He Learned From William Goldman: ‘Take the Reader by the Heart’
Somebody (I think it was my hero Francis Coppola) said the movies that most affect us, the moments that changed us, live on the other side of the moon while we live our lives.

Al Pacino kissing Fredo on the lips. Bob De Niro asking a mirror if it’s talking to him. James Dean discovering oil reaching to the heavens in “Giant.” Those Red Shoes. Burt Lancaster waltzing in Visconti’s “The Leopard.” Mary Badham being told to stand up in “To Kill a Mockingbird” because her father was leaving the room. Kubrick looking beyond Jupiter. All of those emotions and images still exist as the movies play out for the rest of our lives.

And how many of these images that walk around with us are from the imagination and the grandeur of William Goldman. He wrote the book for me, literally, on what a screenplay is, and try as I might,
See full article at Variety »

Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Giant,’ ‘Pillow Talk,’ ‘Written on the Wind’

  • Gold Derby
Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Giant,’ ‘Pillow Talk,’ ‘Written on the Wind’
Rock Hudson would’ve celebrated his 93rd birthday on November 17, 2018. The Oscar-nominated actor made a name for himself as a hunky leading man in romantic comedies, melodramas, and adventure flicks. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Hudson spent years as a supporting player and leading man in B-pictures before shooting to stardom in Douglas Sirk‘s soap opera satire “Magnificent Obsession” (1954). Shot in glossy Technicolor with a sweeping musical score, the film was the first of many the actor made with the German-born auteur, including “All That Heaven Allows” (1955), “Written on the Wind” (1956), and “The Tarnished Angels” (1957). Trashed by critics and adored by audiences in their time, these works have found a second life as clever subversions of American values, influencing filmmakers such as Pedro Almodovar and Todd Haynes.

He received his sole Oscar nomination for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Rock Hudson would’ve celebrated his 93rd birthday on November 17, 2018. The Oscar-nominated actor made a name for himself as a hunky leading man in romantic comedies, melodramas, and adventure flicks. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Hudson spent years as a supporting player and leading man in B-pictures before shooting to stardom in Douglas Sirk‘s soap opera satire “Magnificent Obsession” (1954). Shot in glossy Technicolor with a sweeping musical score, the film was the first of many the actor made with the German-born auteur, including “All That Heaven Allows” (1955), “Written on the Wind” (1956), and “The Tarnished Angels” (1957). Trashed by critics and adored by audiences in their time, these works have found a second life as clever subversions of American values, influencing filmmakers such as Pedro Almodovar and Todd Haynes.

He received his sole Oscar nomination for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Chloe Zhao’s ‘The Rider’ Is a Welcome Antidote to the Age of Donald Trump

Chloe Zhao’s ‘The Rider’ Is a Welcome Antidote to the Age of Donald Trump
A little over two years ago, Chloe Zhao was in the badlands of South Dakota, working with a crew of five people and no professional actors, shooting real-life cowboys. The end result, “The Rider,” changed her life.

Her naturalistic Western, about a rodeo rider named Brady (Brady Jandreau) who suffers a debilitating head injury, won the top prize at Cannes’ Directors Fortnight section in 2017 and scored distribution with Sony Pictures Classics. It landed a Best Film nomination from the Independent Spirit Awards in early 2018, before it even hit theaters, and closes the year out with a Gotham nomination in the same category. And Zhao suddenly found herself in the unlikely position of fielding studio offers, one of which she accepted — Marvel’s “The Eternals,” a superhero movie about immortal beings.

So much has happened that Zhao, who grew up in Beijing and moved to the U.S. as a teenager,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Last Movie

Dennis Hopper’s legendary follow-up to Easy Rider ended his Hollywood directing career for at least fifteen years. Barely seen again after brief premiere bookings, it hasn’t built up a reputation as a suppressed masterpiece. So what is it exactly? A new spotless restoration gives a dazzling rebirth to Hopper’s Perú- filmed deconstruction of Hollywood. The astonishing number of notables in the cast list may in itself demand a viewing.

The Last Movie

Blu-ray

Arbelos

1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 108 min. / Street Date November 13, 2018 / 39.99

Starring: Dennis Hopper, Stella García, Tomas Milian, Don Gordon, Julie Adams, Donna Baccala, Sylvia Miles, Rod Cameron, Severn Darden, Sam Fuller, Peter Fonda, Henry Jaglom, Michelle Phillips, Kris Kristofferson, Dean Stockwell, Russ Tamblyn, Clint Kimbrough, John Phillip Law, James Mitchum, Richard Rust, Toni Basil, Michael Anderson Jr.

Cinematography: László Kovács

Production design: Leon Ericksen

Film Editors: David Berlatsky, Antranig Mahakian, Dennis Hopper, [Alejandro Jodorowsky]

Original Music: Severn Darden,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film Review: Larry Clark’s ‘Marfa Girl 2’

  • Variety
Film Review: Larry Clark’s ‘Marfa Girl 2’
The year 2018 is not what you would call a Larry Clark moment. The director of “Kids,” “Bully,” “Wassup Rockers,” and the new “Marfa Girl 2” — yes, he has made a sequel to a film that virtually no one saw — is now 75 years old, and he may be the cinema’s last shameless mystic of forbidden sexuality. These days, you know you’re watching a Larry Clark film when the sex scenes are real as opposed to simulated, when the close-ups of genitals (mostly male) are multiple and looming and adoring, and when the performers are non-professional actors whose job is to live up to an ideal of skinny hard-bodied youthful tumescence.

That’s been the Larry Clark fetish going back to his two fabled books of transgressive photographs, “Tulsa” (1971) and “Teenage Lust” (1983), and in 50 years of flesh-gazing it hasn’t changed much. Neither has the fundamental controversy that surrounds and
See full article at Variety »

Timothee Chalamet (‘Beautiful Boy’) would be the 2nd youngest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner

Timothee Chalamet (‘Beautiful Boy’) would be the 2nd youngest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner
Last season, 22-year-old Timothée Chalamet could have become the youngest Best Actor winner in Academy Award history for his breakthrough performance in Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name.” Even though Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”) prevailed, Chalamet is still the third youngest Best Actor nominee, just behind Jackie Cooper and Mickey Rooney.

This year, however, he could become the second youngest Best Supporting Actor winner for his performance in Felix Van Groeningen‘s biographical drama “Beautiful Boy.”

Based on the memoirs “Beautiful Boy” by David Sheff and “Tweak” by his son Nic Sheff, the film follows Nic (Chalamet), a teenager who leads a seemingly perfect life, but in reality struggles with an addiction to crystal meth, threatening to destroy his and his family’s entire lives. His father David (Steve Carell) watches his son as he slips into addiction and does everything in his power to prevent his son
See full article at Gold Derby »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Peggy McCay Dead at 90

Peggy McCay, who played Caroline Brady on Days of our Lives for over 30 years, died on October 7 of natural causes. She was 90.

Her Days co-star and close friend Deidre Hall made the announcement on Facebook, writing: "Our dearest Peggy McCay has left us. She was a friend, an activist and a real scrapper!!

I remember meeting her at the bedside of a dear, very ill friend. I backed her up as she ferociously took on doctors and nurses to make sure he had the very best care. She fought that hard for all her causes. Passionate and tireless. And how she loved being 'Caroline'!!"

McCay studied with Lew Strasberg in New York and later assisted in setting up his west coast acting studio, which was attended by such luminaries as Marilyn Monroe, James Dean and Paul Newman.

From 1951 to 1955 McCay starred on CBS soap opera Love of Life as Vanessa Dale,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

James Franco’s Alleged Harassment Ruined ‘The Deuce,’ One of the Best Shows About Sex — Opinion

In 2015, two years before #MeToo, the porn industry severed ties with its golden boy, James Deen. Three days after the “kinky feminist” with boy-next-door good looks was accused of sexual assault by three women, major studios Evil Angel and Kink.com cut all financial ties with him. While its content includes “consensual and exploratory aggressive and rough sex,” a representative for Evil Angel said Deen’s behavior was “contrary to [the] company values.” Deen was a porn star with mainstream crossover appeal who was known and celebrated for performing hardcore sex, yet the porn industry saw no gray area when it came to consent.

That’s a concept Hollywood still can’t seem to grasp. “The Deuce,” a television show about sex, sex work, and the porn industry, did nothing about the allegations against its own golden boy actor and executive producer, James Franco, who stands accused of sexual assault or misconduct by five different women.
See full article at Indiewire »

Today in Soap Opera History (September 30)

1966: A ghost emerged from Josette's portrait on Dark Shadows.

1978: Lucy was devastated when Gary & Val left Dallas again.

1982: Karen Fairgate met Mack Mackenzie in Knots Landing.

1985: General Hospital's Frisco was determined to go undercover."The best prophet of the future is the past."

― Lord Byron

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1955: Actor James Dean died in a car crash at age 24. The Rebel Without a Cause star had connections to a number of people who would one day work in the world of soap operas, including director Lela Swift and writer William Bast (co-creator of The Colbys).

1966: On Dark Shadows, David Collins (David Henesy
See full article at We Love Soaps »

How Geoff Emerick Helped the Beatles Reinvent Music

How Geoff Emerick Helped the Beatles Reinvent Music
Geoff Emerick was just a lad of 19 when he became the Beatles’ engineer, bringing his own brash approach to the experimentation the band was beginning to try in the studio. The immediate result: Revolver, the 1966 masterpiece that forever changed pop music. “A lot of that was down to Geoff Emerick,” producer George Martin told Mojo in 2007. “He brought a new kind of mind to the recordings, always suggesting sonic ideas, different kinds of reverb, what we could do with the voices. He was quite prepared to break rules. ‘You call that top?
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film Review: ‘Cruise’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Cruise’
“Cruise,” written and directed by Robert Siegel, is its own intoxicating brand of youth nostalgia film. It’s set in the outer boroughs of New York in 1987, and it’s every bit as fresh and authentic about the period as a movie like “Adventureland” was — it gets the big hair and the bangles, the mall-boutique “street” fashions and greasy-synth-pop optimism, the whole dressed-in-attitude vibe of kids who’ve had five years of MTV to model themselves on. But “Cruise” also feels like a 1980s movie. That may sound like a contradiction in terms: How can an ’80s nostalgia film be authentic if it’s also mining our affectionate kitsch memories of what the ’80s looked like at the multiplex?

The reason it’s not a contradiction is that Siegel, who wrote the superb screenplays for “The Wrestler” and “The Founder,” isn’t interested in microwaving John Hughes tropes. He has
See full article at Variety »
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