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Peter Fonda, Star of ‘Easy Rider,’ Dies at 79

  • Variety
Peter Fonda, Star of ‘Easy Rider,’ Dies at 79
Two-time Oscar nominee Peter Fonda, who became a counterculture icon when he co-wrote, produced and starred in seminal 1969 road movie “Easy Rider,” then showed Hollywood he could act about three decades later in “Ulee’s Gold,” died on Friday from lung cancer at his home in Los Angeles. He was 79.

His sister Jane Fonda said in a statement, “I am very sad. He was my sweet-hearted baby brother. The talker of the family. I have had beautiful alone time with him these last days. He went out laughing.”

His wife Parky released a statement on behalf of the family, saying “In one of the saddest moments of our lives, we are not able to find the appropriate words to express the pain in our hearts…And, while we mourn the loss of this sweet and gracious man, we also wish for all to celebrate his indomitable spirit and love of life.
See full article at Variety »

Bob Ullman Dies: Veteran Broadway Press Agent Was 97

Robert “Bob” Ullman, a longtime Broadway and Off Broadway press agent whose career spanned Ethel Merman, A Chorus Line, Curse of the Starving Class and many others, died of cardiac arrest on July 31 in Bayshore, Long Island, New York. He was 97.

His death was announced by longtime friend (and former Broadway press agent) Rev. Joshua Ellis.

Among the many Broadway productions on which Ullman worked were Ethel Merman and Mary Martin: Together on Broadway, A Chorus Line (from workshop to Public Theater to Broadway), Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne in The Visit, Lauren Bacall in Cactus Flower, The Dining Room, Driving Miss Daisy, Sunday in the Park with George, and over 150 additional Broadway and off-Broadway plays and musicals.

Actors and theater greats with whom Ullman worked include Tallulah Bankhead, Luise Rainer, James Dean, Dame Edith Evans, Geraldine Page, Phil Silvers, Bert Lahr, Rosemary Harris, James Earl Jones, Sam Waterston, Colleen Dewhurst,
See full article at Deadline »

Hollywood Vampires: The Birth of Midnight Movies on L.A.'s Sunset Strip, Part 3

  • MUBI
Hollywood Vampires: The Birth of Midnight Movies on L.A.'s Sunset Strip is a three-part series of essays by Tim Concannon.Praising Arizona: Louis K. Sher Vs. The Censor, The Case Of Les Amants"Whenever I hear the word cinema, I can't help thinking hall rather than film."—Roland Barthes.1kiva. noun. An underground or partly underground chamber in a Pueblo village, used for ceremonies or councils. Origin: Hopi. Old Town Boutique Shops, Scottsdale Main Street in 2011. Site of the former Kiva Theatre, which closed in 1993.Arguably, before El Topo played at the Elgin in New York's West Village in 1971, and before trans performance troupe the Cockettes performed their Nocturnal Dream Shows for film director, impresario, and protégé of Salvador Dalí, Stephen F. Arnold, at the Pagoda Palace Theatre on San Francisco's Russian Hill, midnight movies began at a theatre adjoining Santa Monica Boulevard, where the Underground Cinema 12 film
See full article at MUBI »

Stacy Keach on Shakespeare, Stardom and His Walk of Fame Honor

  • Variety
Stacy Keach on Shakespeare, Stardom and His Walk of Fame Honor
Six decades into his career, Stacy Keach is finally receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The 78-year-old actor muscled into notoriety playing everyone from Hamlet to Hemingway to Mike Hammer. When the New York Times spotted the then-27-year-old up-and-comer in “Henry IV,” it gushed that his “superb” Falstaff was “so freshly observed that it is almost a new character.”

In the late 1960s, Keach was hailed as America’s Laurence Olivier — right when the country decided it didn’t need one. His agent, the powerhouse Sue Mengers, gave him the truth: “Come out of your ivory tower. Forget the classics. Get to Hollywood.”

He obeyed, and today Keach is best-known for playing heavyweights who tend to kill and be killed on film and TV, where the camera can closely observe his intimidating build, defining harelip and what Elia Kazan called “a sense of violence behind the eyes that’s not housebroken.
See full article at Variety »

Hollywood Vampires: The Birth of Midnight Movies on L.A.'s Sunset Strip, Part 2

Hollywood Vampires: The Birth of Midnight Movies on L.A.'s Sunset Strip is a three-part series of essays by Tim Concannon.Once Upon A Time On The Sunset STRIP1969 on the Sunset Strip was a period of dislocation, dissipation and dissolution from which the Hollywood of the Seventies emerged. A movie theatre adjoining Santa Monica Boulevard, where the Underground Cinema 12 film festival held sold-out midnight shows attended by thousands of Freaks, is an overlooked catalyst of L.A.'s underground scene, alongside Pandora's Box, the club recreated in Riot On the Sunset Strip (1967) and which was the focus of the November 1966 Sunset Strip disturbances.Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon A Time...in Hollywood—which is woven around the Manson family murders in 1969, though it isn't focused on them—is situated in the same unsettling hinterland between film stardom and savage violence that Peter Bogdanovich's Targets touches on as well.
See full article at MUBI »

Natalie Wood movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Splendor in the Grass,’ ‘Miracle on 34th Street,’ ‘Rebel Without a Cause’

  • Gold Derby
Natalie Wood movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Splendor in the Grass,’ ‘Miracle on 34th Street,’ ‘Rebel Without a Cause’
Natalie Wood would’ve celebrated her 81st birthday on July 20, 2019. A former child actress who racked up three Oscar nominations before she was 25, Wood’s life ended in a tragedy that often overshadows her movie career. Yet many of her titles remain classics, so in honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1938 in San Francisco, Wood snagged her first starring role when she was just nine years old in the holiday classic “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947), playing a precocious girl who tugs on Santa Claus’ beard. She earned her first Oscar nomination when she was 17 for the juvenile delinquent drama “Rebel Without a Cause” (Best Supporting Actress in 1955), which made an icon out of James Dean, who died before its release. Wood added two more Best Actress bids to her resume with the romantic melodramas “Splendor in the Grass
See full article at Gold Derby »

Natalie Wood movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Natalie Wood movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Natalie Wood would’ve celebrated her 81st birthday on July 20, 2019. A former child actress who racked up three Oscar nominations before she was 25, Wood’s life ended in a tragedy that often overshadows her movie career. Yet many of her titles remain classics, so in honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1938 in San Francisco, Wood snagged her first starring role when she was just nine years old in the holiday classic “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947), playing a precocious girl who tugs on Santa Claus’ beard. She earned her first Oscar nomination when she was 17 for the juvenile delinquent drama “Rebel Without a Cause” (Best Supporting Actress in 1955), which made an icon out of James Dean, who died before its release. Wood added two more Best Actress bids to her resume with the romantic melodramas “Splendor in the Grass
See full article at Gold Derby »

Giveaway – Win Come Back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean on Blu-ray

Robert Altman’s Come Back To The 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, the fantastical character driven comedy starring Sandy Dennis, Cher, Karen Black and Kathy Bates, for the first time ever in the UK in a Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition as part of Eureka Video’s Masters of Cinema Series on July 22nd 2019, and we have three copies to give away!

Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean is one of the wonderful highlights of an under-appreciated chapter of director Robert Altman’s career. Between the box office disappointment of Popeye (1980) and the explosive comeback of The Player (1992), Altman returned to lower-budgeted, independent filmmaking, often boldly experimenting with how theatre work could be inventively adapted for cinema and television. This period of Altman’s oeuvre also includes such masterworks as Streamers (1983), Secret Honor (1984), and Tanner ’88 (1988), but was initiated by Come Back, and this funny, touching
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Age is just a number: ‘When They See Us’ star Jharrel Jerome aiming to be first man in his 20s to win his Emmy category

Age is just a number: ‘When They See Us’ star Jharrel Jerome aiming to be first man in his 20s to win his Emmy category
Jharrel Jerome did the hard part. Now the 21-year-old “When They See Us” star can make history as the first man in his 20s and the second youngest overall to take home the Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor Emmy.

First awarded in 1955, Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor, which has underdone various name changes, has traditionally honored middle-aged men and veterans. The youngest champ was Anthony Murphy, who was just a wee lad of 17 when he prevailed for “Tom Brown’s Schooldays” in 1973, which was also his first and only acting role. Actors in their 20s have completely struck out in this category and only 12 men in their 30s have won.

See 2019 Emmy nominations: Here’s the complete list of nominees

In fact, twentysomethings are rarely even nominated here. Jerome is the first twentysomething nominee since Jonathan Rhys Meyers, who was 12 days shy of his 28th birthday when he
See full article at Gold Derby »

Scarlett Johansson Claims Her Remark on Being 'Allowed to Play Any Person' Was 'Taken Out of Context'

Scarlett Johansson Claims Her Remark on Being 'Allowed to Play Any Person' Was 'Taken Out of Context'
Scarlett Johansson says comments she made about being able to play any type of character amid a trend of “political correctness” within the casting world have been taken out of context.

The actress, 34, saw renewed focus this weekend on a year-old casting controversy after she told As If magazine that she believed that, as an actor, she should be “allowed to play any person, or any tree, or any animal because that is my job and the requirements of my job.”

The statement struck a nerve for some, considering Johansson stepped down from a role as a transgender man in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘When They See Us’ star Jharrel Jerome could be first man in his 20s to win Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor Emmy

‘When They See Us’ star Jharrel Jerome could be first man in his 20s to win Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor Emmy
Last year, Darren Criss became the second youngest Emmy winner in the Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor category when the then-31-year-old took home the award for “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.” But he may get knocked back to third youngest this year. “When They See Us” star Jharrel Jerome is 21 and would be the first twentysomething to win that category.

First awarded in 1955, Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor, which has underdone various name changes over the years, has long favored middle-aged men and seasoned thespians. Anthony Murphy holds the record as the category’s youngest winner, just 17 when he prevailed for “Tom Brown’s Schooldays” in 1973, which was also his first and only acting role. Actors in their 20s have completely struck out here and only 12 men in their 30s have won.

Three of those thirtysomething champs triumphed in the last five years: Criss,
See full article at Gold Derby »

“Rebel Without A Pause, Kabir Singh Is Arjun Reddy Reloaded” – A Subhash K Jha Review

Kabir Singh

Starring Shahid Kapoor, Kiara Advani, Suresh Oberoi,Arjan Bajwa, Kamini Kaushal

Written & Directed by Sandeep Vanga

Remakes, more often than not, disappoint. This one doesn’t. Kabir Singh doesn’t quite better its precursor, the astonishing game-changing Telugu film Arjun Reddy. And really Shahid Kapoor is no patch on Vijay Deverakonda, who sweated, bled and urinated (literally) into his despicably misogynistic character, investing into this weird thoroughly reprehensible child-man a kind of contemporary resonance that makes for a bizarre blend of Devdas, James Dean and all the rebels without a pause that we’ve encountered before and after Bachchan’s Angry Young Man.

The question is, Kabir Singh (nee Arjun Reddy) ko gussa kyon aata hai? Not unlike Naseeruddin Shah’s Albert Pinto, Shahid Kapoor’s Kabir Singh is a very troubled livid man, threatening, swearing, drinking, and fornicating his way through a life and support system. It
See full article at Bollyspice »

Showbiz History: The Lion King, Keanu as James Dean, and Nph's Undies

six random things that happened on this day in showbiz history (June 15th)...

1960 Billy Wilder's five-time Oscar winner The Apartment had its world premiere on this day in New York City. I just watched it again recently. Shirley Maclaine and Jack Lemmon are perfect in it, don'cha think?

1967 Another premiere, this one for the WW II action drama The Dirty Dozen, an antecedent of a kind to Tarantino's Inglorious Basterds.

1991 Paula Abdul's "Rush Rush" hits #1 (it'll stay there for six weeks). Keanu Reeves does a James Dean thing in the Rebel Without a Cause (1955) themed video. Paula does Natalie of course but no Sal Mineo counterpart? Fail!
See full article at FilmExperience »

Double Dinklage at the Emmys? He’s a front-runner for ‘Game of Thrones,’ but what about ‘My Dinner with Herve’?

Double Dinklage at the Emmys? He’s a front-runner for ‘Game of Thrones,’ but what about ‘My Dinner with Herve’?
Most Emmy pundits agree that Peter Dinklage is a shoo-in for another Emmy nomination for “Game of Thrones.” He’s the only actor who has ever won for the HBO fantasy series, and he has done it three times. But if he’s that beloved by the television academy, why aren’t more of us predicting him for his other role this season in the TV movie “My Dinner with Herve”?

Dinklage is the overwhelming favorite to win Best Drama Supporting Actor for playing conflicted royal advisor Tyrion Lannister. He’s backed by 15 out of the 16 Expert journalists we’ve polled thus far, 8 out of 9 Gold Derby Editors, and 21 of our Top 24 Users who got the highest scores predicting last year’s Emmy nominations. He previously won the prize in 2011, 2015 and 2018. If he’s nominated for the eighth time this year it will extend his record for the most bids in the category.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Monte Hale Centennial

James Dean with Monte Hale on the set of "Giant"

Who? Listen we're not huge western devotees but nevertheless we tip our imaginary cowboy hats today to the bygone tradition of singing cowboys on film. (You know the kind if only from watching Alden Ehrenreich work such charismatic wonders as one of 'em in the Coen Bros Hail Caesar!). Monte Hale, born on this day 100 years ago in Oklahoma, was among the last of such stars...
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Badlands’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek, Warren Oates, Ramon Bieri, Alan Vint | Written and Directed by Terrence Malick

Terrence Malick’s small-yet-mythic 1973 crime drama Badlands has its troubling aspects – on the surface, anyway – but it is a stunning debut feature. Based on the murder spree of Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate, it’s set in the late 1950s, and it is fascinating to see the period before the Sexual Revolution being depicted from the perspective of its immediate aftermath.

Martin Sheen was in his early thirties and Sissy Spacek in her early twenties when they played Kit and Holly. He 25 and she 15, they fall in love in their small Dakotan town. Holly’s father (Warren Oates) naturally disapproves of their courtship. Kit kills him, and so begins the adventure which to the lovers seems like a lifetime, but in reality covers only a matter of months. They build a treehouse in the woods,
See full article at Nerdly »

Stellar Alumni Reflect on UCLA’s Arts Program

  • Variety
Decades before UCLA’s school of Theater, Film and Television formally became one of the world’s top-ranking drama departments, the Southern California university’s arts program was synonymous with nurturing artists whose iconic work irrevocably transformed entertainment, and media itself, for the better.

Marking the first time a major university combined the three disciplines under one administration, UCLA Tft was established in 1990, simultaneously building on the history of the school’s storied curriculum, bolstering industry connections to reflect its impact and influence, and developing a network of facilities, instructors and experts to help prepare and accommodate students for a constantly changing entertainment landscape.

Even before 14-time Academy Awards telecast producer Gil Cates became its founding dean, UCLA’s fine arts departments were already part of a considerable legacy, with a list of famous alumni that included James Dean, Steve Martin, Paul Schrader, Francis Ford Coppola, Carroll Ballard, Rob Reiner,
See full article at Variety »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

SEERock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also
See full article at Gold Derby »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also directed and co-wrote (with co-star Peter Fonda and Terry Southern
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Warrior’ Exclusive Photos: Hostilities Ignite When Two Kung-Fu Masters Walk Into a Bar in the Old West

‘Warrior’ Exclusive Photos: Hostilities Ignite When Two Kung-Fu Masters Walk Into a Bar in the Old West
Two Chinese martial artists walk into a bar…

That may sound like the beginning of a joke, but what results is no laughing matter on Friday’s all-new episode of “Warrior,” the Cinemax series based on a story concept by the late Bruce Lee. Colorfully titled “The Blood and the Shit,” the episode takes a detour from the rest of the season by having Hop Wei members Ah Sahm (Andrew Koji) and Young Jun (Jason Tobin) travel outside of the familiarity of San Francisco’s Chinatown on a stagecoach through the Sierra Nevada. When they’re forced to spend the night with strangers at a frontier saloon in the middle of nowhere, things heat up when a notorious outlaw arrives on the scene.

Directed by Kevin Tancharoen, the episode builds to a violent climax that mixes Old West gunplay and badass kung-fu. The episode also includes guest star C.S. Lee as Lu,
See full article at Indiewire »
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