James Dean (I) - News Poster

News

Could Chadwick Boseman Be the First Person to Earn Two Posthumous Oscar Acting Nominations in Same Year?

Could Chadwick Boseman Be the First Person to Earn Two Posthumous Oscar Acting Nominations in Same Year?
As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to leave Hollywood studios in flux, there are still key decisions being discussed internally about the Oscars, such as actors’ placements in the acting categories. With six months until the Academy Awards, there are several factors needed in order to set a film up for awards season success. Without events to campaign and (metaphorically) kiss babies, the performances and films will be speaking for themselves.

Like the industry, Oscar predictions are in flux, but the biggest unknown is in the male acting categories, which are showing a real fluidity and will continue to do so throughout the season. One of the major questions regards the late Chadwick Boseman and where Netflix will campaign him for his upcoming work in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” While many pundits and prognosticators assume he will ultimately fall within the supporting actor category, there are rumblings that he could be campaigned as a lead actor.
See full article at Variety »

Oscars Predictions: Best Supporting Actor – Can Chadwick Boseman Score Two Posthumous Nominations in the Same Year?

Oscars Predictions: Best Supporting Actor – Can Chadwick Boseman Score Two Posthumous Nominations in the Same Year?
Variety's Awards Circuit is home to the official predictions for the upcoming Oscars from Film Awards Editor Clayton Davis. Following Academy Awards history, buzz, news, reviews and sources, the Oscar predictions are updated regularly with the current year's contenders in all categories. Variety's Awards Circuit Prediction schedule consists of four phases, running all year long: Draft, Pre-Season, Regular Season and Post Season. Eligibility calendar and dates of awards will determine how long each phase lasts and will be displayed next to revision date.

To see all the latest predictions, of all the categories, in one place, visit The Collective.

2021 Oscars Predictions:

Best Supporting Actor

Updated: Oct. 15, 2020 (Pre-season)

Everything is moving and everything is fluid. So many decisions have yet to be made and there are quite a lot of scenarios that can unfold over the next six months. One of which is Chadwick Boseman’s upcoming performance in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom
See full article at Variety »

A Coming of Age Renaissance: Why the ‘Main Character’ Mentality is Making a Comeback with Style

A Coming of Age Renaissance: Why the ‘Main Character’ Mentality is Making a Comeback with Style
Photo: 'Rebel Without a Cause'/Warner Bros. One of the first and most memorable coming of age films is Rebel Without A Cause, released in 1955, the classic James Dean reel where a sleek American teen acts out when his parents attempt to hold him down. Since then, this has been a genre of film that has dominated the American entertainment industry and spread quickly into other countries and has kept an enraptured hold on impressionable audiences to this very day. Each generation has created their own signature brand within the broad “coming of age” label, like the quintessential 80s film about friendship and finding yourself, or the early 2000s teen flick with a heavy dose of innocent romance. Generation X, people born between 1996 and 2010, have chosen to define themselves with the eccentric, offbeat storytelling of indie films. The indie genre allows for a greater range of representation on
See full article at Hollywood Insider »

A Rainy Day in New York Review: Woody Allen’s Long-Delayed Drama is Insufferable and Vapid

A Rainy Day in New York Review: Woody Allen’s Long-Delayed Drama is Insufferable and Vapid
There’s a scene in Mike Nichols’ The Birdcage where Robin Williams’ character is helping Nathan Lane’s character be more “manly.” He has him mimicking different masculine figures including John Wayne to which Lane struts around only to catch Williams’ quizzical look and ask, “What? No good?” Williams’ response perfectly encapsulates how things we’ve been conditioned to believe are normal are actually absurd when taken out of context. He says, “Actually, it’s perfect. I just never realized John Wayne walked like that.” That line kept entering my mind while watching Woody Allen’s A Rainy Day in New York. The film was barely twenty minutes old before it asked Lane’s question and made me realize, “No. That’s a Woody Allen film. I just never realized how hollowly drawn most are.”

That’s not entirely true, of course. I did know. Watching the positions in which
See full article at The Film Stage »

Classic ‘I Love Lucy’ Hollywood Soundstage Reopens for Filming

Classic ‘I Love Lucy’ Hollywood Soundstage Reopens for Filming
NeueHouse, the private Hollywood social club and co-working/events space, is converting its Studio A — which since 2015 has hosted Netflix Emmy parties and HBO premieres — to a soundstage, returning it the purpose for which it was created. The Sunset Boulevard building was once the home of Columbia broadcasting, radio and records, and is where I Love Lucy once shot, Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin recorded, and James Dean worked as an usher. NeueHouse is bringing “it back to its original intent under a controlled and safe environment,” says chief brand officer Jon Goss, after the pandemic-fueled loss of ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Black Panther’ to Air Twice on TBS This Weekend in Honor of Chadwick Boseman

‘Black Panther’ to Air Twice on TBS This Weekend in Honor of Chadwick Boseman
TBS has announced that it will air Marvel’s “Black Panther” twice this weekend in honor of star Chadwick Boseman, who died on Friday at the age of 43.

Black Panther” will air on TBS on Saturday at 9 p.m. Et/Pt and on Sunday at 8 p.m. Et/Pt.

Boseman died of colon cancer, which he had been secretly battling for four years. While filming movies such as “Black Panther,” “Marshall” and “Da 5 Bloods,” Boseman was undergoing cancer treatment.

“Chadwick was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 2016, and battled with it these last 4 years as it progressed to stage IV,” his family wrote in their announcement of his death. “A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all, and brought you many of the films you have come to love so much.”

In “Black Panther,” Boseman played T’Challa, the fearless king of fictional African nation Wakanda. The film
See full article at Variety »

Remembering Chadwick Boseman: 5 Times the ‘Black Panther’ Star Was a Real-Life Superhero

Remembering Chadwick Boseman: 5 Times the ‘Black Panther’ Star Was a Real-Life Superhero
The world knew star Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa, the fearless king of Wakanda who would do anything to protect his people.

But the actor — who tragically died after a four-year battle with colon cancer on Friday — was not only a hero on-screen, but off, as well.

Though Boseman played other major roles, such as Jackie Robinson in “42” and James Brown in “Get on Up,” he left a legacy with “Black Panther,” giving countless children a superhero to look up to. Not only was he the lead of the first predominantly Black cast in a Marvel film, Boseman played the character with vulnerability and undeniable realness.

“His performance as T’Challa isn’t like other actors’ comic-book-film performances. It’s deft and sly and vulnerable, with that singsong accent that lends a note of pensive play to everything he says. And because he infused the character with such a miraculously relatable spirit,
See full article at Variety »

Chadwick Boseman: A Virtuoso Actor Who Could Do Just About Anything

Chadwick Boseman: A Virtuoso Actor Who Could Do Just About Anything
When someone 43 years old dies of cancer, it’s tragic. But when that person is Chadwick Boseman, the word tragic doesn’t fully express it. It’s beyond tragic — it’s cosmically cruel. You feel as if the shock of his loss has ripped a hole in the world. Boseman was a virtuoso actor who had the rare ability to create a character from the outside in and the inside out. In an astonishing trio of biopics, he played Jackie Robinson, James Brown, and Thurgood Marshall, and he captured what each of those men was made of — the unruliness of what they felt, the heights they were scaling, the heady and at times debilitating armor they used to shield themselves from a world tethered to injustice.

Boseman knew how to fuse with a role, etching it in three dimensions, bringing it his own truth. That’s what made him an artist,
See full article at Variety »

Dennis Hopper's 10 Best Movies, According To Rotten Tomatoes

Dennis Hopper's 10 Best Movies, According To Rotten Tomatoes
The late Dennis Hopper had one of the most storied careers in the history of Hollywood. After making his feature film debut opposite James Dean in Rebel Without a Cause, Hopper spent much of the following decade and a half acting on television.

Related: James Dean's 10 Best Movies, According To Rotten Tomatoes

As the industry began to shift with the abolishment of the Hays Production Code in 1968, Hopper changed the landscape of cinema by directing Easy Rider in 1969, the first true American independent movie to become financially viable. The film accurately depicted the zeitgeist of the counterculture movement in America and led to the New Hollywood filmmakers of the 1970s. Throughout his illustrious career, actor Dennis Hopper has accumulated a sterling collection of movies; these are deemed his best.
See full article at Screen Rant »

James Dean's 10 Best Movie & TV Roles, Ranked According To IMDb

James Dean's 10 Best Movie & TV Roles, Ranked According To IMDb
James Dean is considered one of the most influential actors of an entire generation. Much like contemporaries Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift, Dean's brooding and sensitive vulnerability redefined how male actors performed onscreen during the mid-1950s.

Related: 10 Coming-Of-Age Dramas That Defined A Generation

Dean only starred in three feature films, all of which have gone on to become cinematic classics. They include East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause, and Giant, the latter being released posthumously following Dean's tragic death at the age of 24. Despite the limited amount of work, the impact Dean had on the filmmaking landscape cannot be overstated. For more, here are James Dean's 10 Best Movie & TV roles, According to IMDb.
See full article at Screen Rant »

The Genre-Swerving Bill Gunn

The Genre-Swerving Bill Gunn
Mubi's series Double Bill: Bill Gunn is showing July - December, 2020 in the United States.How daring to make a Black picture without a race problem. So daring that the critics stateside assailed Ganja & Hess (1973), so befuddled were they by the vision of director Bill Gunn. He took them famously to task in a New York Times op-ed, which pointedly condemned the whiteness of film criticism. Gunn died in 1989, but his gripe remains unfortunately pertinent today, and at this moment, when much of mainstream media attention afforded to Black films has taken the shape of anti-racist watch lists. These are useful as educational fodder, but less so on the front of appreciating and valuing films from Black directors absent from conversations about art and cinema today—including Gunn’s.Gunn acted in Kathleen Collins’s Losing Ground (1982) and rubbed elbows with James Dean and Marlon Brando. He wrote the
See full article at MUBI »

Almost There: River Phoenix in "My Own Private Idaho"

Almost There: River Phoenix in
This article is dedicated to Mark, one of our subscribers (thank you!), who requested a piece on River Phoenix -Editor.

by Cláudio Alves

It's difficult to write, it's difficult to think, about River Phoenix without the tragedy of his premature death casting a dark shadow over all other considerations. His acting is often talked about in terms of wasted potential, another facet of the same mythos that James Dean inhabits in the public consciousness. Sure, his film work is important, but only as far as it adds to the narrative of a flame that burned too bright and died out too soon. That can be a blessing to one's legacy, a promise of cultural immortality. However, it's also a curse that makes a young actor's amazing career into a footnote of a Hollywood tale of doom and gloom. River Phoenix was and is more than the protagonist of a real-life story about dying young.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Film About Method Acting Pioneer Among Jewish Film Institute Grant Recipients (Exclusive)

Film About Method Acting Pioneer Among Jewish Film Institute Grant Recipients (Exclusive)
The Jewish Film Institute has selected six projects for its inaugural Completion Grants Program, including “The Wild One,” a documentary by French filmmaker Tessa Louise-Salomé about Holocaust survivor, Hollywood filmmaker and Method Acting pioneer Jack Garfein, who worked with George Peppard, Steve McQueen and James Dean.

The funding program supports both emerging and established filmmakers developing “original, contemporary stories that promote thoughtful consideration of Jewish history, life, culture, and identity,” according to a statement.

The programs seeks to fill the gap left when the National Foundation for Jewish Culture closed in 2015. This gap, along with “a growing need for work that builds empathy and understanding within and beyond Jewish culture,” has helped shape the fund and how it is administered. The program, which was formally announced at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival in January, aims to “expand opportunities for filmmakers making Jewish content and help inspire and secure the future of Jewish storytelling.
See full article at Variety »

Rod Serling: Before ‘The Twilight Zone’ came Emmy-winning landmark live TV dramas

Rod Serling: Before ‘The Twilight Zone’ came Emmy-winning landmark live TV dramas
A group of young, scrappy and brilliant writers penned some of the most accomplished dramas presented live during the Golden Age of TV in the 1950s. Writers such as Paddy Chayefsky, J.P. Miller (“The Days of Wine and Roses”), Reginald Rose (“Twelve Angry Men”), Tad Mosel (“The Haven”), James Costigan (“Little Moon of Alban”) and Horton Foote.

But the most influential and best-known of these writers was Rod Serling, who became a superstar as not only creator and writer but host of the landmark 1959-1964 CBS sci-fi/fantasy anthology series “The Twilight Zone,” for which he won two Emmys for his writing. “The Twilight Zone” and even his less successful 1970-73 NBC anthology series “Night Gallery” has overshadowed his earlier work for which he won three Emmys for his writing.

Among his earliest work was the 1953 “Kraft Television Theatre” presentation “A Long Time Till Dawn,” which gave a 22-year-old James Dean
See full article at Gold Derby »

Scott Adkins

Scott Adkins
The martial arts icon talks about some of his favorite action movies. Josh challenges him to a fight.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

Armaggeddon (1998)

Innerspace (1987)

The ’Burbs (1989)

Matinee (1993)

The Debt Collector (2018)

Triple Threat (2019)

Avengement (2019)

Ip Man 4: The Finale (2020)

Masters of the Universe (1987)

Debt Collectors (2020)

The Three Musketeers (1973)

Rocky II (1979)

Rocky (1976)

Rocky IV (1985)

Paradise Alley (1978)

First Blood (1982)

RamboFirst Blood Part II (1985)

Enter The Dragon (1973)

Giant (1956)

Game Of Death (1978)

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (2019)

Marlowe (1969)

Road House (1989)

Grosse Point Blank (1997)

Hard Boiled (1992)

The Killer (1989)

Death Wish (1974)

Seconds (1966)

Face/Off (1997)

Heat (1995)

Under Fire (1983)

True Lies (1994)

The Wild Bunch (1969)

The Raid (2011)

The Raid 2 (2014)

Die Hard (1988)

A History Of Violence (2005)

Munich (2005)

Point Break (1991)

Zero Dark Thirty (2012)

Armour of God (1986)

The Protector (1985)

Under Siege (1992)

Hard To Kill (1990)

Billy Jack (1971)

John Wick (2014)

Other Notable Items

Michael Bay

Our Jesse V. Johnson podcast episode

The Ip Man franchise

Donnie Yen

Dolph Lundgren

Anthony De Longis
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Home Movies: ‘Something Wild,’ a Blast From the Past That Previewed the Future (Column)

Home Movies: ‘Something Wild,’ a Blast From the Past That Previewed the Future (Column)
There’s a fascinating game of movie fandom that goes like this:

“What’s the greatest movie of [that year] or [that decade] that never got the love, or the reputation, it deserved?” If you’re talking about the 1980s, I wouldn’t hesitate to say that it’s Jonathan Demme’s “Something Wild.”

You’ve probably heard of it, and have probably never seen it. It came out near the end of 1986, and though it received a handful of good reviews, along with some fairly hostile ones, the movie was basically ignored. No one was buzzing about it; no one was seeking it out. Its two stars, Jeff Daniels and Melanie Griffith, connected on camera in a way that should have propelled each of them into the stratosphere, but the power of that spark never made it onto the cultural radar. As the villain, the film featured a seethingly handsome young actor named
See full article at Variety »

"Giant" on Amazon Prime

Amazon Prime continues developing a live-action TV series adaptation of author Edna Ferber's multi-generational 1952 book, "Giant", to be produced by Anonymous Content, in the second screen adaptation of the novel:

"...When larger-than-life cattle rancher 'Jordan Bick Benedict' arrives at the family home of sharp-witted but genteel Virginia socialite 'Leslie Lynnton' to purchase a racehorse, the two are instantly drawn to each other. 

"But for Leslie, falling in love with a Texan was a lot simpler than falling in love with Texas.

"Upon their arrival at Bick's ranch, Leslie is confronted not only with the oppressive heat and vastness of Texas but also by the disturbing inequity between runaway riches and the poverty and racism suffered by the Mexican workers on the ranch.

"Leslie and Bick's loving union endures against all odds, but a reckoning is coming and a price will have to be paid..."

The original film "Giant" (1956) was directed by George Stevens,
See full article at SneakPeek »

Edna Ferber’s ‘Giant’ in Development as Amazon Series (Exclusive)

Edna Ferber’s ‘Giant’ in Development as Amazon Series (Exclusive)
Amazon is developing a series adaptation of Edna Ferber’s novel, “Giant,” Variety has learned exclusively.

The series, which hails from Anonymous Content, will be the second screen adaptation of the novel should it move forward. It was previously adapted into an Academy Award-nominated film starring James Dean in his final role. The film also starred Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor. It was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, winning one.

Giant” is described as an epic multi-generational novel, set in Texas from the 1920’s to the 1950’s, that tells the story of Jordan “Bick” Benedict, his extended family, their massive ranch and cattle business, and the transition of Texas from ranching to oil.

Traditions are disrupted when Bick marries outspoken Virginia socialite Leslie Lynnton and brings her home to Texas. Leslie resists the enduring bigotry and economic injustice that underlies the massive fortunes of the Benedicts and other Texas families, and
See full article at Variety »

David Corenswet on Making ‘Hollywood’ and the Sex Scenes That Were Too Racy for Netflix

David Corenswet on Making ‘Hollywood’ and the Sex Scenes That Were Too Racy for Netflix
David Corenswet studied acting at Juilliard, but not even the most meticulous research into the history of showbiz could prepare him for Netflix’s “Hollywood.” Ryan Murphy’s miniseries is set in the 1940s golden age of moviemaking, pulling back the curtain on the repressed desires of the executives and stars who ruled Tinseltown.

But it is done with some major liberties. On the show, Corenswet plays Jack Castello, a World War II veteran who dreams of making it big on screen. While the character is not based on a real actor, he’s a composite — borrowing from James Dean and Montgomery Clift, among others. As the series opens, Castello is a gas station attendant who moonlights as a male gigolo (a story line plucked from the 2012 memoir “Full Service: My Adventures in Hollywood and the Secret Lives of the Stars” by Scotty Bowers). Jack’s first client is the
See full article at Variety »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 84th birthday on May 17, 2020. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also directed and co-wrote (with co-star Peter Fonda and Terry Southern
See full article at Gold Derby »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed