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How 'Set It Up' and Netflix Resurrected the Modern Rom-Com

How 'Set It Up' and Netflix Resurrected the Modern Rom-Com
Audiences who love Hollywood romantic comedies have been in an abusive relationship for a decade.

For a long while, it was magical. Katherine Hepburn tackled Cary Grant (like, actually tackled him) and tamed a cantankerous Spencer Tracy. Doris Day dazzled Rock Hudson. Fonda had her Redford, Streisand had her Ryan O’Neal. The 1990s and early 2000s let us swoon over women Julia, Meg, Reese, Sandra, Meg – each actress anchoring a $100 million hit. But around the 80th year of bliss – the oak anniversary, if you were wondering – the studios gave the genre a coffin.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Carol Burnett Is in Great Health and Doesn't Plan on Slowing Down Anytime Soon!

Calling all fans of Carol Burnett! The 85-year-old actress known for The Carol Burnett Show is not only alive and well, but she's still working well into her 80s. "It doesn’t feel like work. If it did, I don't think I'd want to do it," Carol said in a recent interview. The comedian made her television debut in 1967 but her decades-long Hollywood career is far from over. She currently hosts A Little Help With Carol Burnett, a series in which a panel of children attempt to solve adult problems, now streaming on Netflix. A post shared by Carol Burnett (@itscarolburnett) on May 4, 2018 at 2:37pm Pdt "I still go on the road and do my one-woman Q&A show," she revealed. "I enjoy that because I never know what anyone is going to ask — it keeps the old gray matter ticking. You have to be on your toes!" Many
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Julie Andrews May Have Lost Her Singing Voice but Her Health Is Still in Great Shape

When it comes to Julie Andrews' health, she knows better than anyone that just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. The 82-year-old singer and actress — known for her timeless roles in Mary Poppins, The Sound of Music, and of course, her illustrious Broadway career — has been outspoken about her health ever since undergoing vocal chord surgery in 1997. When she awoke from the surgery — the goal of which was to remove noncanerous nodules from her vocal chords — her gorgeous singing voice was all but destroyed. "If it had happened earlier, it would have been really devastating," she once told People of her trauma. "As it was, it was devastating." Julie posing with Ken Berry. (Photo Credit: Getty Images) "I thought at the time [of the surgery], my voice was what I am. But it seems it's not all that I am," the actress, who went on to star and sing
See full article at Closer Weekly »

‘Fighting American: The Ties That Bind #3′ Review

Written by Gordon Rennie | Art by Andie Tong | Published by Titan Comics

You know a book is that good when you struggle to find new compliments to pay it. This is effectively issue 7 of Fighting American, and every issue has been simply brilliant. Clever, witty, sassy, sarcastic you name it it probably has it. Rennie seems to be having a great time, crafting great storylines with healthy doses of humour and politics. The art, by Duke Mighten and Andie Tong has matched Rennie’s scripts all the way. Whoever thought the whole ‘man out of time’ and ‘oldie struggling with the new’ still had such mileage in it? Not me.

So, as we have seen, a lot is going on. Speedboy has gone Awol, leaving Fighting American to fight on alone recovering the tech flooding the black market. Both are still oblivious to the fact old foe Double-Header is now
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Mariah Carey Reveals Private Battle With Bipolar Disorder: "I Refuse to Allow It to Define Me"

Iconic pop singer Mariah Carey just went through "the hardest couple of years" of her life. In a candid new interview, the 48-year-old confirmed that she has been battling bipolar disorder since 2001 — and we're admiring her for speaking out on such a sensitive topic. "I didn't want to believe it," she told People of her condition in a story published on Wednesday, April 11. "Until recently I lived in denial and isolation and in constant fear someone would expose me." A post shared by Mariah Carey (@mariahcarey) on Dec 31, 2017 at 11:37pm Pst She was first diagnosed 17 years ago after being hospitalized for a mental breakdown, and after all this time, she just recently sought out treatment. "It was too heavy a burden to carry and I simply couldn’t do that anymore," Mariah added. "I sought and received treatment, I put positive people around me and I got back to
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Kennedy Center Honors: Our top 50 recommendations who need to be chosen include Dick Van Dyke, Liza Minnelli, Jessica Lange, Bette Midler

The next recipients for the Kennedy Center Honors will be announced in the late summer, often around Labor Day. The all-star event is held each year in the nation’s capital during the first weekend in December and then airs on CBS as a two-hour special after Christmas.

Each year, the selection committee chooses five entertainment veterans from a variety of fields – film, television, popular music, theatre, and the fine arts. Selected artists are almost always over 50 and generally are 60 and beyond.

The first recipients in 1978 were singer Marian Anderson, actor and dancer Fred Astaire, choreographer George Balanchine, composer Richard Rodgers and conductor Arthur Rubinstein. The most recent honorees in 2017 for the 40th anniversary program were dancer Carmen de Lavallade, singer Gloria Estefan, singer LL Cool J, producer and writer Norman Lear and singer Lionel Richie.

But there are a number of notable performers missing from the honors roll. Our
See full article at Gold Derby »

Doris Day Reflects on Her Life at Age 96: "I've Been Blessed With Good Health" (Exclusive)

Hollywood legend Doris Day is as enamored with her fans as they are with her. "The amount of fan mail she still gets is crazy," her friend and biographer Pierre Patrick tells Closer. "When I was at her house for her birthday, there were bags, and bags of mail in the garage, and she's great at answering it all." Even when her admirers get a little wild, the legendary actress and animal advocate welcomes them with open arms. "If a feral cat wanders on her property," says Bob Bashara, Doris' business manager and close friend, "she's bound to take it in and care for it." It's just one of the things that makes her so happy. "I've been blessed with good health, wonderful pals, lovely fans, and so many precious four-leggers. What more can I ask for?" Doris asks Closer on the eve of her 96th birthday on April 3. Her positivity is contagious,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Kennedy Center Honors: 50 Entertainers Who Deserve To Be Selected

The next recipients for the Kennedy Center Honors will be announced in the late summer, often around Labor Day. The all-star event is held each year in the nation’s capital during the first weekend in December and then airs on CBS as a two-hour special after Christmas.

Each year, the selection committee chooses five entertainment veterans from a variety of fields – film, television, popular music, theatre, and the fine arts. Selected artists are almost always over 50 and generally are 60 and beyond.

The first recipients in 1978 were singer Marian Anderson, actor and dancer Fred Astaire, choreographer George Balanchine, composer Richard Rodgers and conductor Arthur Rubinstein. The most recent honorees in 2017 for the 40th anniversary program were dancer Carmen de Lavallade, singer Gloria Estefan, singer LL Cool J, producer and writer Norman Lear and singer Lionel Richie.

But there are a number of notable names missing from the honors roll. Our
See full article at Gold Derby »

Doris Day Celebrates Her 96th Birthday — See the Exclusive Portrait

Doris Day Celebrates Her 96th Birthday — See the Exclusive Portrait
Hollywood legend Doris Day is celebrating her 96th birthday!

Retired since 1973, she lives quietly in Carmel-by-the-sea, California, her adopted hometown, which is throwing her a weekend birthday bash that will also help raise funds for her pet cause: the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

“I am blessed with good health and so fortunate to be surrounded by loving friends and fans who have traveled so far to help raise money for the precious four-leggers,” Day told People. “It means a great deal to me and I am so grateful for their support.”

The festivities began on March 29 with a fan-run bingo night at the Cypress Inn,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86
John Gavin, who reached the pinnacle of his acting career with roles in Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” and the epic “Spartacus,” later serving as president of the Screen Actors Guild in the early ’70s and as U.S. ambassador to Mexico under Ronald Reagan, died Friday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 86.

The actor was signed to a contract and almost played James Bond in the film “Diamonds Are Forever.”

Gavin was SAG president from 1971-73 and was President Reagan’s first ambassador to Mexico from 1981-86.

His two films with German-born director Douglas Sirk in the late 1950s, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” and “Imitation of Life,” greatly raised his profile in Hollywood and around the country.

Shot in black-and-white CinemaScope, and adapted from the novel by “All Quiet on the Western Front” author Erich Maria Remarque, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” (1958) was the first
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86

John Gavin, Actor in ‘Psycho’ and ‘Spartacus,’ Dies at 86
John Gavin, who reached the pinnacle of his acting career with roles in Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” and the epic “Spartacus,” later serving as president of the Screen Actors Guild in the early ’70s and as U.S. ambassador to Mexico under Ronald Reagan, died Friday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 86.

The actor was signed to a contract and almost played James Bond in the film “Diamonds Are Forever.”

Gavin was SAG president from 1971-73 and as President Reagan’s first ambassador to Mexico from 1981-86.

Gavin made two films with German-born director Douglas Sirk in the late 1950s, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” and “Imitation of Life,” that greatly raised his profile in Hollywood and around the country.

Shot in black-and-white CinemaScope, and adapted from the novel by “All Quiet on the Western Front” author Erich Maria Remarque, “A Time to Love and a Time to Die” (1958) was
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Glass Bottom Boat

Screwball director Frank Tashlin jumps feet first into the chaste world of Doris Day comedies and emerges with his gonzo cred intact. The 1966 film, co-starring Rod Taylor, features sufficient Tashlin-inspired sight gags and winsome Day crooning to keep fans of both artists satisfied. Featuring a supporting cast of able TV vets including Paul Lynde and John McGiver, the movie lit up the box office leading to another Tashlin-Day collaboration in 1967’s Caprice (with diminishing returns).
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Dick Van Dyke Show Star Rose Marie Dishes on Her Wild Life Palling Around with Legends Frank Sinatra and Al Capone

Iconic TV, stage and screen actress Rose Marie is a living legend whose star-studded career and life story are the stuff of Hollywood fairy tales.

A famous child star at age 4, Marie’s made a mark on nearly every aspect of the entertainment industry, including Vaudeville, radio, film, Broadway, and television, whose fans best know her as plucky comedy writer Sally Rogers on The Dick Van Dyke Show.

But just as fascinating as the 92-year-old performer’s impressive résumé is her slate of famous friends – she had a four decades-long friendship with Frank Sinatra and she is the last person
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Operation Petticoat

Tony Curtis grew up idolizing the suave and funny Cary Grant, emulated his romantic moves as an actor and then performed a brilliant impersonation of Grant for Billy Wilder. The next step had to be co-starring with the great man himself. Blake Edwards’ amiable, relaxed submarine movie allows Grant to play with ladies’ under-things, while Curtis wrestles with a pig.

Operation Petticoat

Blu-ray

Olive Signature Edition

1959 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 120 min. / Street Date July 1, 2014 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95

Starring: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Joan O’Brien, Dina Merrill, Gene Evans, Dick Sargent, Virginia Gregg, Gavin MacLeod, Madlyn Rhue, Marion Ross, Arthur O’Connell.

Cinematography: Russell Harlan

Original Music: David Rose

Written by Paul King, Joseph Stone, Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin

Produced by Robert Arthur

Directed by Blake Edwards

The latest in Olive Films’ Signature Selection special editions is Operation Petticoat, a light comedy war movie noted for teaming Cary Grant with Tony Curtis.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86

Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86
Peter Baldwin, who started as an actor and went on to become a prolific TV director throughout the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, died Nov. 19 in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 86.

Baldwin won a Primetime Emmy Award for directing “The Wonder Years” and a Cable Ace Award for “Dream On.”

Born in Winnetka, Ill., he was discovered by a Hollywood talent scout in his senior year at Stanford. He became one of Paramount’s “Golden Circle of Newcomers” and appeared in films including “Stalag 17,” “Little Boy Lost” and Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Ten Commandments.”

He served three years in the Navy and returned to Paramount, where he appeared in “The Tin Star” and “Teacher’s Pet” with Clark Gable and Doris Day.

After touring with Julie Harris in “The Warm Peninsula” play, Baldwin moved to Italy, where he appeared in films by Robert Rossellini, Dino Risi and Francesco Rosi. There he started
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Charles Manson Is Dead at 83 - Here Are 9 Chilling Facts About the Infamous Cult Leader

  • Popsugar
Charles Manson Is Dead at 83 - Here Are 9 Chilling Facts About the Infamous Cult Leader
Charles Manson died at the age of 83 on Nov. 19. According to authorities, the murderous cult leader passed away at a hospital in Kern County, CA from natural causes. He was one of the most infamous figures in criminal history, ordering one of the most horrifying murders in Hollywood: that of actress Sharon Tate. He was the leader of one of the world's most infamous cults. And he was recently factored into American Horror Story: Cult. With Charles Manson's recent resurgence as a person of interest in the public eye, it's entirely possible that a lot of people in the present day don't know his story. After all, he committed his most prolific crimes in the late 1960s. Here's a primer on who he is, what he did, and where he was before his death. He had a tumultuous early family life. Charles Manson was born on Nov. 12, 1934, in Cincinnati,
See full article at Popsugar »

Cult Leader Charles Manson, Whose 1969 Murders Horrified the Nation, Dead at 83

Cult Leader Charles Manson, Whose 1969 Murders Horrified the Nation, Dead at 83
Charles Manson, whose name became synonymous with evil after his arrest in connection with the 1969 murders of actress Sharon Tate and eight other people, has died of natural causes.

He was 83 and serving nine life sentences in California’s Corcoran State Prison at the time of his death, which was confirmed by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

“I said a prayer for his soul,” Sharon Tate’s sister Debra tells People of the moment after she received a call from a prison official informing her Manson died on Sunday night.

Adds Anthony Dimaria, the nephew of Manson victim
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Charles Manson Dies at 83

Charles Manson Dies at 83
Charles Manson, the notorious leader of the Manson Family cult that murdered actress Sharon Tate and six others in 1969, died Sunday in a Bakersfield, Calif., hospital. He was 83.

The California Department of Corrections released a statement reading, “Inmate Charles Manson, 83, died of natural causes at 8:13 p.m. on Sunday, November 19, 2017, at a Kern County hospital.”

Manson returned to the hospital in mid-November after being hospitalized in January. He was transferred out of Corcoran State Prison, where he had been serving nine life sentences. He had been denied parole 12 times.

The shocking murders brought the carefree hippie era of the late 1960s to a dark end, with Manson and his followers becoming infamous cultural figures. Though he didn’t commit the Tate and Labianca murders himself, the Corrections Department said “On December 13, 1971, Manson received a first-degree murder conviction from Los Angeles County for the July 25, 1969, death of Gary Hinman and another first-degree murder conviction for the August
See full article at Variety - Film News »

1965: Underground Cinema, Film Poets May Be Pulling Viewers’ Limbs

From the San Rafael Daily Independent Journal, November 25, 1965

Film Review

by John F. Kearney

Nearly every seat was taken five minutes before the start of the movie.

By the time the wall lights in the Gate Theater, Sausalito, were dimmed, a middle-aged couple had squeezed into the last remaining space, a few feet from the screen set up on the stage.

Whatever their motives, members of the audience were in high spirits to witness the arrival in Marin of an American phenomenon known as the Underground Cinema.

There were those curious to see movies made in cellars and back yards on a shoestring by arty people who, until a couple of years ago, expressed themselves only in the relatively introvert world of canvas and paint.

Then there was the fun crowd, anxious not to miss a thing considered “in,” even if it meant having its collective leg pulled from time to time.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Film Review: ‘Wait for Your Laugh’

Film Review: ‘Wait for Your Laugh’
The recent death of fabled French star Danielle Darrieux at age 100 prompted speculation that she might have sustained the longest career in showbiz. However, still-alive-and-kicking Rose Marie has the edge — though retired (most reluctantly) at a mere 94 years, she started nine full decades earlier, racking up a career that encompassed practically every popular performance medium in the U.S. As lively and likable as its subject, Jason Wise’s documentary “Wait for Your Laugh” pays fond tribute to a tireless trooper whom generations have known mostly as a wisecracking second banana often funnier than the bigger stars she supported. It should draw out patrons “of a certain age” who likely haven’t journeyed to the multiplex for some while.

Wheelchair-bound now, Rose Marie’s mind remains sharp as a tack, and she happily walks us through one hell of a professional resume. Born Rose Marie Mazetta in 1923 Manhattan, she was taken to shows from an early age by
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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