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The Trouble With Johnny Depp

The Trouble With Johnny Depp
Matt Mahurin for Rolling Stone

Johnny Depp isn't here yet. Still, his presence is all around the 10,500-square-foot rented mansion at 16 Bishopswood Road in London's Highgate neighborhood.

He is here in the busy hands of Russell, his personal chef working up the Peking duck. He is here in the stogie-size joint left by the sink in the guest bathroom. He is here in the never-ending reservoir of wine that is poured into goblets. And he is here in a half-done painting upstairs that features a burning black house, a child
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Richard Alan Greenberg, Creator of ‘Superman’ and ‘The Matrix’ Opening Credits, Dies at 71

Richard Alan Greenberg, Creator of ‘Superman’ and ‘The Matrix’ Opening Credits, Dies at 71
Richard Alan Greenberg, the title designer who created the intros for classic films like “Superman,” “Alien” and “The Matrix,” died at his home in New York City on Saturday. He was 71.

The Oscar nominee has left an indelible mark on the sci-fi world, creating iconic openings for some of the most famous films in the genre and pushing further ground on the art of making opening credits. His first big work though his studio, R/Greenberg Associates, was the opening credits on “Superman” in 1978. using loud “whoosh” sounds with John Williams’ iconic theme to present the movie title, Superman’s famous insignia, and the names of stars like Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman and Christopher Reeves in bright blue letters that flashed by the screen.

Also Read: Vader, WWE and WCW Legend, Dies at 63

Just a year later, Greenberg took the complete opposite approach with the opening to Ridley Scott’s “Alien.
See full article at The Wrap »

Hear David Lynch Describe His Relationship with Marlon Brando in Exclusive Audio from New Memoir ‘Room to Dream’

Driven by an honest perspective on his life and work, the just-released memoir-biography hybrid Room to Dream is the most intimate window we’ve yet had into David Lynch’s mind. Should you, like me, be left wanting more, the audiobook companion, read by him and co-author Kristine McKenna and clocking in at a whopping 15 hours and 45 minutes, might be a good place to turn. But just as their book has fun with the biographical format, neither is this a straight-and-narrow treatment of its format: while Lynch’s written sections resulted from “numerous rewrites” of interviews with his co-author, the spoken-word rendition is, according to Penguin, a retelling “inspired by McKenna’s transcriptions that appear in the book.”

Long story short: I’m very glad to debut audio from one of Room to Dream‘s finest passages — Lynch’s short, somewhat troubled, ultimately (kind of) charming relationship with Marlon Brando,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Room to Dream’ Cracks Open David Lynch’s Mind, In His Own Words

Recently and under the influence of alcohol, a shall-go-unnamed collaborator of David Lynch’s confided in me a telling detail: true though he is to himself as both an artist and human being, the Lynch persona is curated — not fake, per se, but cultivated to further his success and maintain much-desired privacy. That I’m even bothering to share this is proof enough of the former, and perhaps whatever interest it yields would account for the latter. We can picture (and certainly hear) the man at the snap of a finger, but does that familiarity make him easier to approach? Or is there only an air of intimidation surrounding anyone who’s grown mythic? I think you can answer that for yourself. Still, could all be a case of repeating — perpetuating — an outsider’s mischaracterization. Maybe I’ve got their phrasing off. It could be that my memory’s slipped entirely.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Father’s Day: Top 16 best Oscar-winning dad performances include Gregory Peck, Dustin Hoffman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Henry Fonda

  • Gold Derby
Father’s Day: Top 16 best Oscar-winning dad performances include Gregory Peck, Dustin Hoffman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Henry Fonda
How would you like to spend a special Father’s Day with your dad? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about fathers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actor who plays a father where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a father, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 16 films contain a paternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a father. There’s the courageous father, the inspirational dad, the loving father and even the monstrous father. Lead and supporting actors include Daniel Day-Lewis, Dustin Hoffman,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Father’s Day Films: Top 16 Best Oscar-Winning Dad Performances Ranked

  • Gold Derby
Father’s Day Films: Top 16 Best Oscar-Winning Dad Performances Ranked
How would you like to spend a special Father’s Day with your dad? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about fathers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actor who plays a father where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a father, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 16 films contain a paternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a father. There’s the courageous father, the inspirational dad, the loving father and even the monstrous father. Lead and supporting actors include Daniel Day-Lewis, Dustin Hoffman,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Next Stop, Greenwich Village

Paul Mazursky’s affectionate memoir of the New York bohemian life circa 1953 has a feel for the milieu and an honest appraisal of the kooky culture therein: artists, actors, users, takers, sweethearts, neurotics and phonies. Lenny Baker’s main character may have an amorous relationship with his girlfriend Ellen Greene, but his strongest connection is with his overbearing mother, played to perfection by Shelley Winters. She was a Best Supporting Actress nominee for The Poseidon Adventure but not for this? Honestly.

Next Stop, Greenwich Village

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1976 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date May 22, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Lenny Baker, Shelley Winters, Ellen Greene, Lois Smith, Christopher Walken, Dori Brenner, Antonio Fargas, Lou Jacobi.

Cinematography: Arthur Ornitz

Film Editor: Richard Halsey

Original music: Bill Conti

Production Designer: Phil Rosenberg

Produced by Paul Mazursky and Tony Ray

Written and Directed by Paul Mazursky

Fans of Paul
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Jurassic Park’ At 25: 25 Facts You Never Knew

Jurassic Park at 25: Facts You Never Knew

On the 16th July 1993, cinema as patrons of the Unites Kingdom knew it, was changed forever. How? With the release of a little film called Jurassic Park. Released just over a month after the Us’ launch on 11th June 1993, the film was an instantly beloved masterpiece, capturing the imagination of an entire planet, and for a while, held the title of highest grossing film of all time.

Now, twenty-five years on, a fifth film in the franchise, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is set to be released, proving that people still love dinosaurs. That wouldn’t have been possible though without Jurassic Park and Steven Spielberg’s mastery. The film, based on the novel by Michael Crichton, told of a new theme-park that had managed to successfully bring back-to-life creatures that hadn’t existed for 65 million years or so. It’s a film
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Marlon Brando's "One-eyed Jacks": America At The Crossroads

  • CinemaRetro
Eve Goldberg presents an in-depth examination of the only film Marlon Brando ever directed: "One-Eyed Jacks" (1961)

"One-eyed Jacks: America At The Crossroads"

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A new movie schedule arrived every few months. A two-sided paper treasure chest brimming over with promises of time travel, existential wisdom, and singing in the rain. Wild Strawberries, City Lights, Battle of Algiers, Belle de Jour.

We grabbed up the schedule and studied it with care, taped it to the refrigerator door, marked our calendars. The African Queen, Yojimbo, Rules of the Game.

We made cinema voyages all over town — to the Vista in Hollywood, the Nuart in West La, the art deco Fox Venice. Before VCRs, DVDs or streaming, revival movie theaters were about the only place a film junkie could get a fix. We might find an occasional nugget on late night TV, John Ford’s Stagecoach, perhaps,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘McQueen’ Trailer: Documentary Delves Into the Darkness and Genius of Fashion Designer Alexander McQueen

‘McQueen’ Trailer: Documentary Delves Into the Darkness and Genius of Fashion Designer Alexander McQueen
“No one discovered Alexander McQueen. Alexander McQueen discovered himself,” opens the trailer for “McQueen,” a new film about the legendary British fashion designer. Becoming head designer of Givenchy at 27, McQueen was known for his eponymous fashion label, which was marked by theatrical fashion shows and cutting edge designs. After his death in 2010, The Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted a show entirely to McQueen’s prolific 19-year career, resulting in record attendance for the museum at the time.

Written and directed by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, the film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival to rave reviews. Ettedgui is best known for co-writing the 2015 documentary “Listen to Me Marlon,” a compelling and detailed portrait of Marlon Brando made entirely from audio recordings of the actor. Bonhôte is one of the founders of Pulse Films, which co-produced “The Witch” and “American Honey.”

“I don’t want to
See full article at Indiewire »

The Story Behind Marlon Brando’s Godfather Makeup

If you get right down to it the makeup for the Don Vito Corleone wasn’t really what amazed during the role. His heavy jowls, the way he spoke, and the manner in which he kept himself was mostly a product of Marlon Brando to be honest. His audition wasn’t much to think about since he used some shoe polish to turn his hair black and stuffed his cheeks with tissue in order to get the heavy jowl look and the gravelly voice that the Don was known for. But obviously once he was cast for the movie he had to

The Story Behind Marlon Brando’s Godfather Makeup
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Bernardo Bertolucci's Tone-Deaf Attack on Ridley Scott

Bernardo Bertolucci's Tone-Deaf Attack on Ridley Scott
In late 1972, the 31-year-old Bernardo Bertolucci unleashed his most controversial movie on the world. The picture was Last Tango in Paris and it caused a sensation. Critics raved about the story of a middle-aged American expatriate and his anonymous sexual encounters with a gorgeous young Frenchwoman. “[Last Tango] is one of the great emotional experiences of our time,” wrote Roger Ebert. “It’s a movie that exists so resolutely on the level of emotion, indeed, that possibly only Marlon Brando, of all living actors, could have played its lead. Who else can act so brutally and imply such vulnerability and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’
Just like Carl Spackler and his imagined victory at the Masters, “Caddyshack” was the surprise cult comedy no one saw coming.

The year was 1980. Chevy Chase and Bill Murray were at the peak of their fame in their halcyon “Saturday Night Live” days; Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight were having career resurgences; and “Animal House” was a massive blockbuster that ushered in a new generation of slobs vs. snobs comedy into the mainstream.

And yet the cast, producer Doug Kenney and director Harold Ramis were prepared for “Caddyshack” to tank. Ramis was a first-time director trying to wrangle a fiasco of a production. Early preview screenings made them think they had floated a Baby Ruth in the pool rather than landed on the next “Animal House.” And the response from critics and the box office was tepid at best.

Entertainment Weekly film critic Chris Nashawaty’s new book, “Caddyshack: The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story,” charts the journey the film took to cult acclaim, from Kenney’s time at National Lampoon to the cast’s rise to stardom at Second City and “SNL.” There are a lot of surprise revelations about the making of “Caddyshack,” from cocaine-addled benders on set to some last minute scrambling to get Murray’s character in the film at all.

Also Read: 'Groundhog Day' at 25: How Bill Murray Rom-Com Became an Accidental Classic

The original draft of the script was 200 pages long – and Carl Spackler wasn’t in it

The original script of “Caddyshack” written by Ramis, Kenney and Brian Doyle-Murray clocked in at 200 pages and was far different from the movie it would become. “It looked like the Bible,” an executive on the film, Mark Canton, says in the book.

The script went through so many last minute changes on set that the actors lost track of them. Entire monologues and memorable lines of dialogue from Chase, Dangerfield, Murray and more were completely improvised, as was much of the film.

Not once in the 200 pages did the name Carl Spackler appear, Nashawaty writes. Murray was a late addition to the cast, and when he finally did have a character, he appeared in only a handful of scenes. His “Dalai Lama” story was given to another actor who struggled with it, his scene with Chase’s character Ty Webb was tacked on after Murray had already wrapped and returned to “SNL,” and his “Cinderella Story” monologue was entirely an invention of Murray. There was nothing written in the script for the scene, so Ramis gave Murray the direction, “Did you ever do imaginary golf commentary in your head?” The rest is, well, a miracle.

Also Read: Bill Murray to Open 'Caddyshack'-Themed Bar Near Chicago

Mickey Rourke was strongly considered to play Danny Noonan

The role of Danny Noonan went down to two finalists — Mickey Rourke and Michael O’Keefe, who ultimately booked it. “This was the early, young, hot, relaxed Mickey Rourke,” O’Keefe says in the book. “He was as compelling as Marlon Brando in a way back then…But I’m a little more easy on the eyes than Mickey. Clearly it would have been a much darker movie.”

Ramis described Rourke as “maybe too real for the movie,” saying, “Michael O’Keefe seemed like a really good boy. Plus, he was a scratch golfer. Mickey Rourke was much more complicated.”

Nearly everyone was doing cocaine – A Lot of it

Michael O’Keefe says in Nashawaty’s book that “cocaine was everywhere” on the set. He described his 11 weeks there as “a permanent party.” Instead of responsible producers making sure everyone played by the rules, Kenney led the charge of much of the cast and crew’s rampant drug use. “The eagle has landed; the eagle has landed! Get your per diems in cash, the dealer’s here,” he would yell, running through their motel hallways. Chase described that cocaine would just “materialize” on set, much to the annoyance of Knight, who always got to bed early, showed up for call time early and didn’t appreciate the looser, more improvisational approach to filming.

Also Read: 'Ghostbusters' Origin Story: How John Belushi and Cocaine Helped Inspire Slimer

Shooting at the same time and released the same summer was “The Blues Brothers,” which was also when John Belushi started getting heavily addicted to cocaine. According to Nashawaty, when that film’s budget started rising as a result of Belushi’s binges, the studio was forced to crack down on the parties on the “Caddyshack” set.

Bill Murray was a “magnificent flake”

Murray has countless urban legends to his name, but his legendary status started even before his “Caddyshack” days. He was shooting the Hunter S. Thompson movie “Where the Buffalo Roam” in the summer of ’79, and was due back in New York for “SNL” in the fall, so Ramis had him for just six days. But Murray never made it clear just when he’d show up on set. As far as Ramis knew, Murray was Mia.

Turns out Murray had commandeered Lorne Michaels’ Vw bug and had driven it everywhere from Los Angeles to Florida to Aspen and took it upon himself to install a stereo along the way. When he finally arrived, he rolled up in a golf cart and said, “Which way to the youth hostel?” The following morning, Murray and actress Cindy Morgan (who played Lacey Underall in the film) woke up together on a nude beach in Jupiter, Florida, after the two had just met.

The gopher saved the day

As Nashawaty writes, it became clear fairly quickly that Ramis was out of his depth in editing “Caddyshack.” He had come from an improv background and used a “yes and…” mentality during filming, but he struggled to find a connective thread for the countless scenes of his actors just riffing and being goofy. The first cut of “Caddyshack” clocked in at four and a half hours. And it was a mess.

They had several editors look at the footage and attempt to salvage it, but it was executive producer Jon Peters who suggested that the gopher, only seen sparingly at first, could be the thing that tied everything together. They were then forced to ask the studio for an extra half-million dollars to build an animatronic gopher and, in the process, cut out the romantic subplots of many of the younger actors. When Kenny Loggins saw that gopher dance, the theme song he wrote should’ve been a clue that everything with “Caddyshack” would be just fine: “I’m Alright. Nobody worry about me.”

Read original story 5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’ At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Canon Of Film: ‘The Godfather’

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look back at Francis Ford Coppola‘s masterpiece, ‘The Godfather‘. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

The Godfather (1972)

Director: Francis Ford Coppola

Screenplay: Mario Puzo & Francis Ford Coppola based on the novel by Mario Puzo

I’ve noticed how, The Godfather doesn’t get the same appreciation outside of the U.S. as it does here, lately. People even start discussing the entire trilogy as one film sometimes to justify their ranking of it so high, an act which would’ve been unheard by most, as we typically never considered The Godfather Part III legitimate, despite it showing amazing moments of greatness. And you know, as an American, an Italian-American at that, it be can hard to defend The Godfather at times to people who confront it. Some say Apocalypse Now was better,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Highway Dragnet (1954) – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Jim Henry (Richard Conte) is a decorated soldier who has just returned from the Korean War. Making his way across the country to California, he’s stopped over in Vegas to visit an Army friend. While killing time until his dinner date he cozies up to a pretty blonde in a bar before the two argue very publicly. The next day finds Jim hitchhiking out of Vegas when he is arrested by the police—for the murder of the girl he fought with the night before. Jim claims he can prove his innocence but his Army pal, on a classified mission, has disappeared, along with Jim’s alibi. Feeling railroaded, Jim manages to escape the clutches of Detective White Eagle (Reed Hadley) to go on the run.

While on the road he meets two ladies, a high-class photographer, Mrs. Cummings (Joan Bennett), and her assistant, the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’

  • The Wrap
Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’
Last Tango in Paris” director Bernardo Bertolucci had harsh words for Ridley Scott this weekend, telling a crowd at the Bari International Film Festival that he thinks the “All the Money in the World” filmmaker “should be ashamed” for removing Kevin Spacey from the lead role.

While Bertolucci said he respects the #MeToo movement and the awareness of abuse that it has raised, he thinks that Scott gave in to industry demands by making a deal with TriStar Pictures to reshoot Spacey’s scenes as J. Paul Getty with Christopher Plummer replacing him in the role. The sudden reshoots just weeks away from release were announced after the Spacey cut of the film was pulled from the closing night of AFI Fest in the wake of sexual assault accusations against Spacey made by several men.

Also Read: Kevin Spacey Sexual Assault Case Under Review by La District Attorney

Since those accusations were made, with the first coming from actor Anthony Rapp, investigations have been opened against Spacey by law enforcement in Los Angeles and London. A confidential hotline was opened by the Old Vic Theater, which Spacey was the artistic director of for 11 years, to allow anyone with allegations of abuse by Spacey to step forward. Meanwhile, Netflix removed Spacey from their marquee series, “House of Cards,” with Robin Wright becoming the main character for the show’s final season later this year.

But as Spacey’s career has nosedived, Bertolucci said that after seeing Spacey get erased from “All the Money in the World” he “immediately wanted to make a film” with the actor.

Also Read: Kevin Spacey Foundation in UK Shuts Down After Sexual Assault Accusations

Bertolucci came scrutiny after footage leaked two years ago of a masterclass in which the director revealed that actress Maria Schneider had not been fully informed of crucial details in a scene in “Last Tango in Paris” where Marlon Brando’s character uses a stick of butter as a lubricant to simulate sex with Schneider. Before her death in 2011, Schneider said in an interview that she “felt humiliated and, to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci.”

Bertolucci has since defended himself, saying that aside from the butter, he knew about the violent nature of the rape scene. He continued to defend himself at the Bari Festival this weekend.

“On the set she was happy,” he said. “Do not believe on social media when they say it was rape: the butter scene was pure simulation.”

Read original story Bernardo Bertolucci Scorns Ridley Scott for Replacing Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’ At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Spike Lee Looks at the World Differently After 'Black Panther'

Spike Lee Looks at the World Differently After 'Black Panther'
Alec Baldwin and Spike Lee didn't want to spend an hour on the Tribeca Film Festival stage discussing their own movies. Instead, they each picked one favorite film to kick off a wide-ranging conversation that touched on their New York upbringing, crafts as an actor and director, respectively, and the game-changing Black Panther.

Baldwin, who led the conversation in downtown New York City on Tuesday night, picked 1954's On the Waterfront, starring one of his young acting idols Marlon Brando, as his movie of choice, while Lee chose 1951's A Place in the Sun — starring Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Spike Lee Praises ‘Black Panther’: It’s ‘Changed Everything, Especially for People of Color’ — Tribeca

Spike Lee Praises ‘Black Panther’: It’s ‘Changed Everything, Especially for People of Color’ — Tribeca
Black Panther” filmmaker Ryan Coogler has made no bones about his affection for fellow director Spike Lee’s sprawling filmography, including using a post-screening Q&A of his own boundary-breaking Marvel film to heap praise on both Lee’s “Malcolm X” and “Do the Right Thing,” and now the Brooklyn mainstay is returning the favor. During an hour-long conversation at the Tribeca Film Festival on Tuesday evening, Lee was asked by an audience member if he’d seen Coogler’s film and what he thought of it.

“I loved it! My brother, I’ve seen it four times,” Lee answered. (Lee just so happened to be in attendance at that same screening where Coogler named his most influential films, so we’ve long known he’d seen the film at least once.)

Lee continued, “I will say, I look at the world now differently, before ‘Black Panther’ and after ‘Black Panther.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sony Crackle to Develop Sci-Fi Series Based on ‘Heart of Darkness’ (Exclusive)

Sony Crackle to Develop Sci-Fi Series Based on ‘Heart of Darkness’ (Exclusive)
Sony’s Crackle is developing a series reimagining of the Joseph Conrad novel “Heart of Darkness,” Variety has learned exclusively.

The project is set in the future where Earth is a distant memory. It is described as an exploration of what it means to be human on a space odyssey where the survival of the human race hangs in the balance and will explore themes of race, immigration, and colonization much like the book.

Heart of Darkness” has been adapted in various forms over the years. Perhaps most famously, it served as the inspiration for Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 Academy
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Marvin Gaye's Son Denies Father Got It On With Marlon Brando

  • TMZ
Marvin Gaye's son says his dad was a ladies' man who would've laughed off Quincy Jones' supposed revelation he got into bed with Marlon Brando. We spoke with Marvin Gaye III who told us he was really upset Quincy had decided to keep himself relevant by spreading rumors about his father's sexual exploits, which Gaye's son says are 100% false. Gaye III thinks Jones' bad memory got the better of him when he said in an interview,
See full article at TMZ »
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