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Scarecrow-88

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The Reluctant Astronaut, 26 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

A kiddie ride astronaut in a small town, Roy Fleming (Don Knotts), might just get an opportunity to participate in a mission in space! Knotts fans should certainly enjoy this more than most. He gets to rely on his facial gifts and physical comedy in order to tickle your funny bone as his reactions to ongoing crises and accumulating problems are the film's main attraction. His "war hero" father, Buck (Arthur O'Connell), spreads the news of his son's inclusion in NASA's space program, although the letter of employment from the government is for a janitorial position! Roy learns that when he gets to Houston, and his demanding boss, Donelli (Jesse White), expects him to sweep, mop, and wax to his highest capability! But when Roy's friends and neighbors (well, Buck's friends and neighbors) becomes so swept up in and obsessively devoted to his "big promotion" (and the notion that he will be headed for space), the enthusiasm for a phony mission begins to overwhelm their hometown hero. A glorified return home where Roy must try and make the town believe he's been in training to be an astronaut, and an eventual greeting from Buck and two of his closest friends at Houston (where Roy must get into character and costume (astronaut suit), while leaving his janitorial post, leading them on a tour of the place) certainly cause the hometown hero a ton of grief.

Fans of Barney Fife will recognize one particular scene all too well: when all the guys are gathered around, Roy embellishes his training with only a kid (who knows a lot about space through programs on television and in school) calling him out as a phony. The swagger and self-flattery are most amusing if you are used to seeing Barney get all puffed up over some development that truly wasn't of any heroism he was responsible for. A majority of the film has Knotts all tied up in knots, as he tries to figure a way out from his predicament…living a lie. The picture with the real astronauts (making it into the hometown paper!) while holding a mop, the tour at Houston which results in mistakes he makes because he doesn't know what he's talking about, and his eventual trip into space (the Russians plan to send up a dentist, so the USA must best them in sending up the least possible candidate for a trip into space!) where if something might could go wrong it does are highlights in this implausible bit of fantasy.

As a vehicle for Knotts, "The Reluctant Astronaut" is ideal as it plays to his strengths. He even gets a very nice-looking romantic love interest in Joan Freeman (who had been elusive to him, eventually coming around). Slasher fans will know Freeman from Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter as she was the mom of Tommy Jarvis (Corey Feldman)! Roy's fear of heights is played up especially when he continues to avoid airplane flights. I do think the film perhaps takes a bit too long to get to Knotts in space (its main draw), but the cast is full of delightful character actors (although, not quite as good as "The Ghost in Mr. Chicken" but close) to accompany the lead comic icon before the finale. Leslie Nielsen could be a surprise for his fans, playing his celebrated astronaut that Knotts befriends and respects totally straight…he is responsible for Knotts' eventual space flight! Some fun use of NASA footage and how Knotts is involved in mishaps involving the space program. Perhaps not his best solo comedy effort, but not bad, either…

My Night at Maud's, 26 December 2015
8/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

During the Christmas Holidays, a Catholic (Jean-Louis Trintignant) is eyeing to romance a lovely young blonde (Marie-Christine Berrault), but a chance meeting with an old Marxist friend (Antoine Vitez) leads to his pleasant and enlightening visit with Maud (Françoise Fabian), resulting in possible fireworks.

I could provide florid descriptions of the film, but I will get to the brass tacks…this is about people discussing Christianity/Catholicism during a holiday where its presence is most felt (except Easter). This is my first Rohmer film, but I think I get an idea of what his work aims towards: adults discussing themes that are important to him, using characters in a particular setting(s), at particular times, to advance their beliefs, philosophies, interpretations, outlooks, and overall views on love, life, the past, present, and future. What do they hope to find? What is their hearts set on? Why are they who they are? What brought them to where they are and what do they hope is waiting on them? In the case of "…Maud's", Trintignant's Jean-Louis is lonely, does engineering work that doesn't necessarily fill the void in his life so desired, and devoutly declares his reasons for being Catholic but doesn't necessarily disavow the lives and beliefs of others; in this film's case, Fabian's Maud, and her soon-to-be-ditched boyfriend, Vidal (Vitez). A running, driving force in the conversations between Jean-Louis and Vidal is Pascal, his views on mathematics and philosophy. Jean-Louis reads from Pascal's work from the perspective of a Catholic while Vidal sees other sides considering he's a "lapsed Catholic" who doesn't adhere to the moral/religious principles so discerned from this form of faith. At any rate, Maud is non-Catholic, too, and her liberality is rather seductive to Jean-Louis. I see Maud as someone perhaps very seductive to any form of religion that requires the sacrifice of sexual freedom. She isn't a harpy, but a woman unbound to following a code of ethics important in the case of Jean-Louis. He's looking for a particular character-type, a certain kind of woman to marry, and while Maud is an attractive, captivating, alluring, aggressive, challenging, care-free alternative to what Jean-Louis desires, she simply doesn't model after what he sees as his potential mate.

Look, this is dialogue heavy and concerns itself with people talking a lot. I just want to clear that up right away. Stay far away from this as possible if you don't want to watch a Catholic stick up for why he is devout, but credit to Rohmer for allowing him to not be so staunch and abrasively card-carrying that Jean-Louis becomes too distanced from the intellectual, atheistic part of the audience certain to be bothered and uncomfortable with a film that is Pro-Catholic. Setting the film around Christmas gives the film a nice backdrop (cold, gray in the film's whiter than white B&W photography in Clermont) even if two of the four main characters aren't conducive to its general direction towards celebrating the recognition of Christ in the holiday. Maud is refreshing as is Jean-Louis, because their conversations are civil, engaging, intelligent, and non-combative. Maud listens to Jean-Louis, and vice versa. That is also the case with Jean-Louis and Vidal…despite their differences; the two have good rapport and respect each other. I think that is why the film has been so lasting and heralded. It is about the way people engage and communicate. The methods behind how close or far away to approach one another.

The celebrated "night" of the film, where Maud and Jean-Louis are alone, in her bed, with a decision to make (sex or no sex?) is fascinating because the woman is open for a possible embrace, but the man has to determine if this course is worth taking. Their talk has this aura of desire behind it I liked to see develop…too often it is so much more about attraction than how words can lead two people to connection. Interestingly, I found the later coupling of Jean-Louis and Françoise rather compatible but less compelling as Catholicism leads them together, but that hanging question of "what might have been?" resurfaces when he meets Maud in passing. Either way, Jean-Louis charted his course towards Françoise, but chance (a theme I read Rohmer emphasizes in his work a lot) led him to Maud and Vidal.

Nestor, the Long-Eared Christmas Donkey, 24 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Roger Miller's vocal narration and singing makes "Nestor…" a real treat! This Rankin & Bass stop motion animation special is short and sweet. It is a Christian-themed story, though, so be warned if you have no interest in such themes as the travel of Mary (carrying Jesus) and Joseph to Bethlehem with help from a disregarded, mistreated, put-upon, victimized long-eared donkey named Nestor, and an angel sent by God to encourage Nestor's journey towards Bethlehem on an important mission. The story is told by a donkey that does chores and helps out the elves for Santa while the reindeer and Ole Saint Nick take off to spread gifts to kids everywhere on Christmas Eve. Nestor was born into a bad situation, improperly abused verbally and physically by his brutish owner (with a wolf that laughs at Nestor's mistreatment), while his mother tries to keep him fed and safe as much as possible. When Roman soldiers demand animals to help their empire, Nestor is used as bait but his long ears enrage them (the owner put socks on the donkey's ears to try and trick them!). Not getting paid anything for his attempted deceit, the owner gets rid of Nestor, hurling him into the cold, wintry night to die. In her efforts to protect Nestor, his mother perishes as the snow covers her. Nestor is alone and left to fend for himself, until an angel (voiced by Brenda Vaccaro) arrives to provide him with details on a mission he is to perform for God…the donkey will earn a respect and adoration from the very animals that tormented and ridiculed him.

Again, there's a very Christian presence throughout the television special but I do think the message of "rebounding from alienation and bullying because you are different than others" is universal. I think anyone who has ever felt inadequate or different, considered insignificant or ugly, could very well feel a kinship with Nestor. That he is accepted when it is confirmed that Nestor isn't worthless (God saw significance in Nestor, why shouldn't others?) provides a lesson in not judging book by its cover…we all have a chance, regardless of what we look like and despite the handicaps we might have, to be something special. Celebrated voice artist, Paul Frees, is the vocals for the nasty owner of Nestor and the cruel donkey dealer Joseph and Mary receive Nestor.

The Year Without a Santa Claus, 24 December 2015
8/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Another stop motion animated Yuletide treat from Rankin & Bass gives perspective to the importance of Santa Claus as Ole Saint Nick (Mickey Rooney, perfectly cast as the voice of Kris Kringle) decides to take a break from Christmas due to sickness, exhaustion, and disenchantment, believing the kids are tired of him. Mrs. Claus (voiced wonderfully by Hazel's own Shirley Booth) will take it upon herself to make sure Christmas isn't ruined, perhaps even motivating Santa to re-think his decision. To get kids to embrace Santa, she sets her sights on seeing a Dixie town called Southtown receives snow during Christmas (having to negotiate a "weather barter trade" between Heat Miser (responsible for sun and warmth) and Snow Miser (responsible for snow and cold), getting "mom" involved because of their bitter rivalry)). Meanwhile, Santa will need proof that kids still care about him ("Blue Christmas" cleverly used in a musical number) in order to take back the reins and return to doing what he does so well. The voice-work, animation, use of oft-neglected characters involved with Christmas animation (Vixen, winding up accidentally in an animal shelter (!), Mrs. Claus, unabated by her hubby's loss of desire, stirs up the base in order to see that kids receive a Christmas to be remembered, Jingle and Jangle Bells (elves in Santa's workshop) helping Mrs. Claus put together a gameplan to rescue Christmas), and inventive story all make "The Year Without Santa Claus" quite a special addition to your Holiday Season line-up. Santa gets to be a bit more relevant, instead of just a secondary character who shows up to drive the sleigh during Christmas Eve. The message of not losing a grip on one of the important reasons of the season is loud and clear. Just wholesome family fun.

Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome, 23 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

After a good trio of RKO Val Lewton pictures, Karloff's career would kind of slide into less prestige B-movies and television. Here in "Dick Tracy Meets Gruesome", Karloff returns to the kind of heavies notable during his Warner Bros. or Universal Studios periods. He stars as a recently released crook who just so happens to literally stumble into a scientist's new experiment which renders humans "frozen" and helpless, with no movement. This new invention allows Karloff's Gruesome to initiate a series of bank robberies, using the chemical gas to subdue the clerks, security guards, bank employees, and clients in place mid movement while he and his associates rob joints in the city. Enter Dick Tracy (Ralph Byrd), on the case to help the police catch Gruesome and his gang, during his investigation the detective is led to a scientist named Dr. A. Tomic (Milton Parsons), which eventually puts him in the crosshairs of Gruesome. The movie includes Skelton Knaggs in goggle-eyed glasses assisting Karloff in an attempted capture of a comatose patient by disguising themselves as paramedics, Karloff shooting a potential female informant in cold blood as she walks down a quiet, empty street from the driver's seat of his car, Karloff and Tracy in a protracted shootout, Karloff collapsing in a street after stumbling upon the gas resulting in finding himself in a morgue (!), and Anne Gwyne (House of Frankenstein; she stars as Tracy's love interest) the only awake witness to an ongoing bank heist while everyone else is frozen by the gas. Dialogue heavy for sure, and the gas' effects are rather cheesy. Karloff handles the dastardly persona with kid gloves, bossing around those involved in his criminal activities, orchestrating the robberies and capable of the most heinous of acts if it means protecting himself from another trip to the slammer. Byrd is totally outshone by Karloff, and the less of him the better (which is kind of sad considering the movie is supposed to be his starring vehicle). Knaggs' soft voice and creepy eyes in those glasses (and diminutive size) is rather quite a contrast to Karloff's brutish antagonist. The cops are spinning their wheels for much of the running time, as the villains stay ahead of them. A set up in the hospital is what leads to Tracy getting the upper hand on the crooks. RKO seems to be imitating something you'd see from Warners in the 30s during the Cagney/Robinson/Bogie period of gangster shootouts…Karloff certainly wields a mean pistol. Another menace to add to Karloff's rogues gallery... The movie plays up an against-the-clock rush-time due to a pushy reporter who happens upon details of the case while Tracy and the cops are discussing everything at the station. As there is no honor among crooks, Karloff's team decide to try and turn on him, which is a big no-no.

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Remember the Night, 22 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Really laid back Christmas Eve-New Years Day holiday romantic comedy melodrama with the star power of a very comfortable Fred MacMurray and effortlessly charming Babs Stanwyck giving the material a major bump, even though Preston Sturges' original screenplay once again provides a discomforting treatment towards a highlighted supporting African-American character, this being a butler talked down to and presented as none too bright. I always had a problem with how Sturges presented black characters, and this film goes down that road once again. But when the film gets away from that it can be quite a cozy little holiday movie. MacMurray is a prosecutor who strategically convinces the judge to allow a pickpocket (Stanwyck) the week from Christmas Eve through New Years before her trial (she stole a bracelet from a jewelry store in New York City). The move was clever because he wanted to keep the jury from considering him a meanie for putting her through a trial during "the most wonderful time of the year". As serendipity would have it, the two wind up together during the holiday season (a bond paid by an associate of MacMurray's drops her off at his apartment!) and fall in love while on a road trip to his mother's home in Indiana (with an unfortunately melancholy stop at her hateful mother's house). MacMurray just seems at ease and wears the part like a comfy pair of loafers. Stanwyck is the kind of actress who can take a part in what is basically supposed to be frothy romance and reveal a wounded young woman MacMurray learns is an actual product of a cold and indifferent upbringing, waffling between allowing her emerging love for him to reveal itself and concealing it so his career won't be jeopardized (a favorite scene of mine has Stanwyck and MacMurray's mother talking about where he came from, the humble beginnings and the hard work to achieve what he has, and how if he allows his caring for her to usurp the accomplishments built over time it would be a detriment to a promising career, with admittance of love unveiled to no surprise) through the influence of their feelings for one another.

What stood out to me in her performance is how she could just burst into tears (her glassy eyes often seem to gradually wet up but hold in place) during several moments but almost always maintains a resolve…it is only when she returns to mother's home, and is greeted cruelly does Stanwyck's character break down. MacMurray has a character so at peace in his own skin, that even when he faces possible criminal trouble (while on a joyride, he accidentally drives through a farmer's fence, parks in the farmer's field, and disturbs the farmer's cows; the farmer, with shotgun in hand, demands they drive into the town (outside NYC) to face a local magistrate for what he done, Stanwyck in tow), he is cool and calm…what makes this amusing is how Stanwyck commits arson to open an escape for them as the farmer and judge put out the flames! The visit to MacMurray's family (mother and spinster sister, and relative Willie) in Indiana presents them as solidly cohesive and warm towards each other, an exact opposite of Stanwyck's mother and stepfather in the nearest town not far distant in another county. A majority of the film takes place on Christmas Eve and Day concluding after New Year's Day…so it constitutes as a breezy 90 minutes of holiday fun. As 40s melodramas go, you can't beat the team of MacMurray and Stanwyck…a fascinating alternative to Double Indemnity. A key scene of hilarity has Stanwyck's defense lawyer laying on the theatre in regards to how his client was a *victim* not a criminal during that day's theft in NYC! It goes on for minutes! Stanwyck's unwillingness to allow MacMurray to lose his case at the end just emphasizes her redemption.

The Twilight Zone - Night of the Meek, 21 December 2015
8/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

"Look, ma, Santa Claus is loaded!"

Absolutely wonderful Twilight Zone episode has a superb Art Carney starring as a pitiable, downtrodden, suffering old drunk employed as a department store Santa who lives on Poverty Row. He just wants the poor kids and elderly to get a gift, something that would make the time of the year worth celebrating for a change. John Fiedler, the very voice of Winnie the Pooh, is the owner of a department store who employs Carney, eventually firing him for his drunkenness in front of kids wanting to sit on his lap, as their grumpy parents, pushy and impatient, demand his full attention. Without a dime to his name, Carney isn't able to purchase anymore booze, but ultimately his main desire is just to deliver presents to the needy just wanting one year where something special will happen to them. Finding a bag in an alley near garbage cans (and a cat), Carney soon realizes that when he reaches inside, a gift is available to all the poor in his urban neighborhood! Magic of the season is alive and well! Despite being shot on video, the material and delightful central performance from Carney rise above the cheapjack presentation. There's a spot-on monologue from a sympathetic Carney as Fiedler takes him to task for his alcoholism in front of the kids, and the reasoning behind his misery is poignant and understandable. Raising awareness to the plight of good people who don't deserve poverty, with the Twilight Zone allowing Carney the chance to provide a small gift to those not used to receiving much at all, "Night of the Meek" is a real treat particularly during the Christmas season. Highly recommended.

Fiedler getting a bottle of champagne from Carney after he's taken to a police station when his bag of goodies is considered stolen, only for the police officer not to find anything but cans, is beautifully done. The Santa Claus twist at the end, fulfilling one wish for Carney (who deeply cares for the impoverished kids and his elderly brethren), is so satisfying.

Christmas with the Kranks, 21 December 2015
3/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

There's an actual scene where Jamie Lee Curtis is going after a runaway ham she paid way too much for and Tim Allen is almost arrested for "borrowing a Christmas tree". It is one of those unfortunate comedy misfires that seemed to pop up a lot around 2004 (like the awful Ben Affleck flick, Surviving Christmas), with too good a cast to be stuck in. Allen nearly kills himself while trying to put a Frosty Snowman figure on the very top of his roof, decides to forgo Christmas with the whole neighborhood up in arms and laying it to them thick for doing so, and purposely plasters water on his driveway so that noisy carolers will slip and fall (!) pretty establishing himself as a major bone of contention during the Holiday Season. Allen wants to use the money normally spent on Christmas festivities and his daughter (gone away to work for the Peace Corps) for a cruise with his wife, but the neighbors are not happy with his decision. Dan Aykroyd is kind of the neighborhood watchdog, a type of respected voice considered a high authority. If he is displeased, then the community backs him. At first, Allen will not decorate, including the Frosty display…this is considered a standard that the neighborhood expects and demands. Allen is at odds with old man M. Emmet Walsh (whose wife is battling cancer), particularly his cat. Their relationship, no matter how strained, doesn't stop Curtis from caring about Walsh and his wife. The film is desperate for laughs: there is a scene where Curtis is attempting to get a tan in a tanning salon, in a bikini, with Tom Poston's priest, among other passersby, catching an eyeful and unable to look elsewhere, while Allen has a botox injection, unable to eat or drink! And the uproar to get a party and decorations together at Allen and Curtis' house before their daughter and her fiancé arrive is a bit far-fetched and rather silly (why not just tell Blair they had planned a cruise and, reason being, her absence was the catalyst in this decision? She is a big girl and can handle disappointment. It is her fault for springing on them her arrival…), but the point of it all is for the Kranks to repair their rift with the neighborhood and to show how the holiday spirit would bring about a coming together and forgiveness. Oh, and the movie wouldn't be complete without a Peruvian ballad! Oh, brother. And Arthur Pendelton, as Marty, who knows people but no one knows him! Cheech Marin and Jake Busey are two cops who have a disregard for Allen over his not buying a calendar from them while not contributing to the cub scouts in buying a tree sets off the animosity of the neighborhood against them. Allen could give tickets to a cruise to two neighbors at the end, but it takes Curtis scolding him in order to do it…he's quite a dick. Curtis, stuck in Christmas sweater and a mop of hair, is too sexy for this rather unflatteringly plain part. This is pretty much exactly as its reputation suggests…not a particularly worthwhile experience. The cast tries hard but the material utterly fails them. It is hard to fathom a neighborhood would give a rat's ass about Allen enough for him to be rescued from a deserved humbling.

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The Incredible Hulk - Life and Death, 20 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

"Life and Death", about how David Banner (Bill Bixby) must rescue a pregnant single mother from black market doctors operating an illegal clinic that sells babies born from young women ill-equipped to raise children on their own, has the highlight of Big Green loose in a hospital obstetrics ward! David arrives in a fictional town in Oregon, agreeing to be a guinea pig in the DNA research of a scientist named Dr. Rhodes (a young Andrew Robinson; Dirty Harry & Hellraiser). Rhodes is in league with a clinic called Matrix involving a devious operating team of Ellen (a particularly loathsome Julie Adams of Creature from the Black Lagoon fame) and Dan (the sinister looking John Warner Williams; Hospital Massacre). They will go as far as kill a pregnant mother pleading to keep her baby, Carrie (Diane Cary). David befriended Carrie while both were hitchhiking, and is in the hospital when a young mother (bleeding badly and left in a street to fend for herself by Matrix!) is brought in, requesting Rhodes (he helps deliver the babies for Matrix). Because David was at the front gate of Matrix, while walking Carrie to the place, he was privy to their location. When David proves to be a threat (after trying to talk Carrie out of staying at Matrix, with Ellen, Dan, and Rhodes seeing him doing so), the trio at Matrix orchestrate a plan to inject him with morphine sulphate and leave him to die! But the Hulk will have none of it, as David reacts negatively to Rhodes using morphine in a hypodermic while he's strapped to a chair, putting the needle into his neck. This sets off the Hulk in the hospital while Rhodes (believing he'd die) retreats to Matrix to carry out the delivery and possible execution of Carrie.

Seeing the Hulk bursting through a wall of an elevator (after ripping out the circuit board that operated the buttons!), a brick wall to the hospital, and later a wall at the Matrix (well, at least this wall was wooden board instead of brick), the beast gets plenty of action. There's even a rather unique scene where an angered David tries to climb stairs in the Matrix main building, gradually transitioning into the Hulk, as each hand movement up a step shows him a little more green. There's a nice moment for the Hulk when he smiles as the baby of Carrie's is held in his hands proving that somewhere inside David is there to keep the monster from harming innocents. Seeing the Hulk throw Rhodes down a flight of steps and then hoist up Dan and let him fall from the top of the stairwell to the floor are startling in their violence, but there aren't two better candidates than these guys to be treated so poorly. Again Bixby once more has nice chemistry with another actress (Cary) playing a female he meets in passing while trying to find a procedure or cure to help him kill the Hulk, keeping it from ever surfacing (even if it saves his life over and over again). As often was the case, this trip is a failed one, but perhaps Rhodes' procedure with a particular kind of surgery would have done him more harm than good anyways. The episode plays up the morphine's effects on both David and Big Green, leaving them woozy and physiologically under duress (their sight is blurry, and both walk haphazardly, barely able to walk or function)…it works!

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Akhbar's Daughter, 20 December 2015
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

As an "extension" of sorts to Tales from the Darkside and Monsters, from the gang at Laurel, this not too shabby tale directed by Romero colleague, John Harrison, has the look and feel very familiar to its anthology relatives of the 80s. Christopher Atkins is what many might consider a "ladykiller", a womanizing "counselor" with a reputation for bedding women and having an impressive "prowess". A new client, the wealthy millionaire living in Morocco, named Akhbar (Ed Setrakian), invites him to his palatial estate. Becoming enchanted with Akhbar's daughter, Kara (Roya Megnot), Atkins' smarmy, cocky Bitterman finds a lady not so interested in being seduced, extends an extra effort in adding her as a conquest, a notch in his belt. In fact, Kara wants nothing to do with the sleazy pretty boy. However, Betterman gets visits from a lady that seems to be Kara, but he's in for quite a surprise! I think the conclusion will be especially satisfying for those who loathe the type of roaming eye, libido-driven, sexually-motivated, woman-devouring scumbags with great looks and financially successful. In the opening scene, after meeting with Akhbar, Betterman and his secretary neck and kiss a little bit, not long after he sets a lustful eye towards Kara. He arrives in Morocco, purposely leaving behind his secretary because he doesn't want her in the way. The fate that occurs to Betterman at the end couldn't have happened to a more deserving individual.

Rather erotic, with some nice blue lighting during night scenes, and Kara is delish. Atkins is good as a guy you just love to despise…he has the looks and confidence, with that wicked smile, to pull it off. Despite its budget, the show does a decent job of making us believe it is in Morocco due to some solid set decoration.


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