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matt_tawesson-1

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39 reviews in total 
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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
More creepiness to come, 5 September 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I first saw this episode pack on a VHS tape last evening with my mom. The first episode, "A Fear of Spiders" really freaked me out. Patrick O'Neal played a guy who wanted no use for the crazy librarian lady who lived upstairs. He is trying to write some columns, but is first disturbed by his phone ringing (person calling was the crazy lady), then he hears her footsteps and she rings his doorbell seconds later. But while he's trying to do his typing, he is bothered not only by the woman's calling, but with his kitchen faucet dripping. He goes in there and finds a small spider in the sink. He tries to kill the spider by drowning it in running water. The spider goes down the drain, but seconds later, it comes back by crawling out of the drain pipe (same action is repeated). Then, he decides to get rid of the crazy woman, but seconds later, he hears a squeaking sound from another room. He finds where the sound is coming from, opens the door and there is an extremely large spider in the room (God, this really freaked me out I almost jumped out of my skin)! The guy then goes upstairs to the woman's apartment and tells her what he saw, and asks how to eliminate the spider. They go back down to his place, and she locks him in the room and leaves after a few minutes. He begs and panics because he he thinks the spider is going to kill him. The squeaking sound is heard again, and the spider kills him.

"Junior" was not that long, but it too was creepy. This character looked like Herman Munster. I didn't stick around for "The Academy", but the "Marmalade Wine" was also quite eerie, with the guy walking in the rainstorm, being cared for by this doctor, only to have his feet amputated, etc. Out of all the episodes this pack had, "A Fear of Spiders" and "Marmalade Wine" were the scariest.

Something Evil (1972) (TV)
0 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Excellent TV film. It has to be out on DVD eventually!!!, 19 June 2010
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

My mother first saw this movie when it premiered on television back in 1972. I first saw it a few years ago on the Encore channel (roughly part of it), and thought it was an amazing film. I had recently been looking for a copy on DVD but couldn't find one until I got one on ioffer.com (it was a copy that was recorded on TV and transferred to DVD). In my case, it looked great, and all that. Sandy Dennis played Marjorie Worden and Darren McGavin played her husband Paul. Johnny Whitaker is the couple's son, Steven, and the daughter Laurie is played by twin girls (played by Sandy and Debbie Lampert). The family moves into a farmhouse in the countryside, without knowing until later that the previous occupant had been driven to suicide by jumping out of the 2nd floor window of the barn. Then, some mysterious things start happening shortly later on. Marjorie is hearing sounds of a baby crying, the family has a party at the house (and two guests mysteriously die on the way back home), multi-colored gel in a mason jar in the barn then in the house, and the son is being possessed by the devil! Another shocking thing is the sight of those scary ass red demon eyes peering out of a window while some silly commercial is filmed. Several other mysterious things are seen in the film, but they are odd as well. To me, those hideous eyes are what freaked me out the most. The family then moves out of the house to get away from the evil lurking in there. This movie never runs very long (at 73 minutes), but it's still worth watching. It would be great if this could be released on DVD (commercially), but until so, just deal with what is recorded from TV.

Great comedy with a bit of poignancy..., 9 June 2010
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Ally Sheedy stars as Jessie Montgomery, a spoiled girl who lives in a fancy mansion with her very wealthy father (played by Tom Skeritt). After taking a group of people dancing late one night, she is lectured by her father the next morning for charging over $900 on his credit card. Then, that night, she is pulled over for speeding and spends the night in jail for drug possession. While she sits in jail, her father wishes that he never had a daughter. Meanwhile, Stella (the fairy godmother, played by Beverly DeAngelo) appears in the jail and bails Jessie out. Stella explains that the charges were dropped, and that no criminal record exists for Jessie. But there's a shocking surprise for Jessie. Stella had cast a spell that caused Jessie to be broke, and with no family or friends. She doesn't believe it, and tries to go back to what was her home, but her father, chauffeur and maids act as though they never knew her. She meets with Stella again in the park, and is advised to get a job. Jessie ends up finding beat up high heeled shoes from a dumpster, and gets a job working as a maid for a snobby rich couple in a similar mansion. The couple have a very disgusting taste for clothes and not a lot of respect for Jessie. She meets a cook (played by Merry Clayton) and a Spanish speaking maid, and works with them (she also ends up meeting Nick, the mechanic, who also lives at the house). After a while, there's a party at the house, where Jessie's father and Stella are among the many guests. The people are asked what their wishes are, and Jessie wishes that their wishes come true. At the end of the movie, the spell is removed, and Jessie's father "knows" her again, as does the chauffeur. She also gets her original high heeled shoes back from the beginning of the movie and no longer has the ugly ones from the dumpster. Jessie and Stella say goodbye, with Stella driving away in a bubble toward the starry sky. Great movie, and I read that it is somewhat of a "Cinderella-in-reverse" story, that I agree with. This is also very 80s, because of the clothing, and the pastel colored blinds (gross!!), but I feel it has held up well over time.

1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Great film that must be released on DVD soon!!, 13 February 2010
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is a favorite movie of my mother and I. We have it on VHS, but are disappointed about it not being out on DVD. Why this movie is not out on DVD (still?!) remains a mystery. The acting is stellar by all of the actresses. A bunch of female friends get together at a deserted Woolworth's Five and Dime store in 1975 in a small Texas town to reunite 20 years after starting a James Dean fan club that they had started in '55, at the time when the film Giant was being made. Throughout the movie, the story line changes every few minutes from '75 to '55 (the flashback scenes from '55 are seen in mirrors). Cher is wonderful as Sissy, who was the character obsessed about her breasts, and you have Mona (played to the hilt by Sandy Dennis), who claimed to be the mother of Jimmy Dean, Jo (played by Karen Black; the male version played by Mark Patton), was wonderful as well, Juanita, who was the religious woman, and Stella Mae played by Kathy Bates in an early role, and Edna Louise, the character who was pregnant with her 7th kid. This movie could be considered as a comedy and a drama, and it is one that must be watched a lot more times than once. The songs that are played throughout the movie were ones that were done by the McGuire Sisters (their hit song, Sincerely is the one that stands out), and when the movie ends, Mona, Joanne and Sissy are seen in the mirror dancing to Sincerely as the closing credits come on. Then the song fades, and we see eerie footage of the deserted store in disarray: a broken ceiling fan lying on a table, the swivel stools gone, shelves that will never be stocked again, etc. The only sound that is heard is the wind blowing outside. To whoever is the copyright owner of this movie: please get this out on DVD soon, there's no reason not to.

Sleeper (1973)
Funny, funny flick!!, 29 December 2009
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I am not a fan of Woody Allen's, but his role in this movie cracks me up BIG TIME. I first saw it on TCM some years ago on TV, and was amazed at what I saw. Woody plays Miles Monroe, who worked as a health food store worker. He became ill and was scheduled for an ulcer operation at a hospital, but was mistakenly put in cryogenics and was revived.....200 years later (in the year 2173, being in the 22nd century)! When he regains consciousness, he is told by the people who revived him that all of his relatives and friends had passed away long ago. He then learns of life in the era he wakes up in. He is then told to find the Aries Project. A lot of the props were quite funny, such as the flying helicopter (that Miles had no success working with), and is known as an alien that the security police are looking for. Numerous sight gags are funny as well, such as "Orgasmatrons", confessional robots, robot tailors, a mechanical dog that talks. Diane Keaton played a wonderful role in the movie. This movie takes place during an era that none of us are going to see, but then again, the physicality of what we see (the devices, props, etc.) are also things that I don't think will be used at that time.

0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:
As equally funny as the original, but with an Italian flair!!!!, 9 April 2009
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This sequel to Grumpy Old Men is as funny as the original. Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, and the rest of the cast from the original movie reprise their roles. John and Max are still feuding, but the tension between them has softened. There are, however, some changes: Ariel and John are married and there's a new girl in town named Maria Ragetti. She's moved to Wabasha to open up an Italian restaurant at the former Chuck's Bait place. When the boys discover what Maria's intentions are, they hatch a scheme to ruin the grand opening of the restaurant and try to keep Chuck's business going, even though the inventory of the former business has been cleared out and the interior remodeled to look like an Italian restaurant. Max and Sophia meet, but there's a disagreement about what the place should be. Maria goes to the neighborhood bar to try and reason with Max, but to no avail. It seems as though Max and John have trouble saying goodbye to what is no longer there. The humor between Lemmon and Matthau's characters is still spiced up and is still able to put viewers in stitches. Then, Max and Maria get married, and the restaurant starts selling bait, as well. Great movie, great cast, great fun!!

2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
A look at the dysfunctional life of Mrs. Hunsdorfer and her daughters.., 29 September 2008
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

A wonderful movie, 1972's The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds stars Joanne Woodward as Mrs. Beatrice Hunsdorfer, an unhappy widowed woman who struggles to cope with daily life while raising two teenage daughters. Paul Newman's directing is superb and given two thumbs up. I first saw this film at my grandparents' home back in the early '90s, and loved it right away. There are a number of things going wrong for Mrs. Hunsdorfer: her husband died in the Korean War and she's left with the responsibility of raising her girls while living in a messy house, she has no job and stays home reading the ads in the local newspaper. She then takes in an elderly lady, known as "Nanny" (Judith Lowry) to get some income. Nanny's presence in the movie is wonderful, though she doesn't speak. Her daughters have issues of their own as well: Matilda (or Tillie) is growing marigolds that were dipped in radioactivity for a science project, and Ruth is wanting to spend time with her boyfriend (and has seizures). Little by little, Mrs. Hunsdorfer's life is going downhill. She ends up drinking and bitching to Tillie about seeing too much rabbit feces in the house, and a number of other things. She also dreams of opening a business--a small café downtown--but is told by her brother-in-law that she can't handle it. This is mostly a drama, but for me, it is also a comedy as well. It really saddens me that this movie is still not out on DVD. I strongly hope that it gets released sometime soon. To the producers of this film: PLEASE get this flick out on DVD soon!!! A++ for the story and acting and Paul Mewman's directing.

Mahogany (1975)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Great Diana Ross flick!!!, 16 August 2007
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I never even saw this movie at all until I got it on DVD a few weeks ago. The only thing I knew regarding this movie was the title theme that Diana sang (Do You Know Where You're Going To). She sang this song quite well, and it is one of my most favorite songs of hers. Her acting was quite remarkable. She plays a ghetto girl who dreams of being a fashion designer. The movie starts out with the Asian fashion show thing; what is surprising is that the costumes glowed in the dark at the beginning. Anthony Perkins plays Sean McAvoy, the fashion photographer who tries to take advantage of Tracy's career (he gave her the nickname Mahogany). Anthony's character in this film is as equally crazy as his Norman Bates character in Psycho from 15 years earlier, but, of course, he doesn't have his mother's shell in a house up a hill. The craziest thing in the film is toward the end, where Sean and Tracy are shooting a commercial in an Italian sports car, and then he starts taunting her, to where the car goes out of control, Tracy gets nervous and tries to get control of the car, but the car crashes and Sean is dead. She survives. Billy Dee Williams is great as the politician boyfriend of Tracy's. Beah Richards plays Tracy's aunt Florence. Her role was great as well, even though her screen time was limited. I was so happy to get this movie on DVD, because I never saw it before--not even on TV. A must have for any fan of Diana's. The scenes in Rome are beautiful as well. The music in the film is brilliant also, especially the title theme song in instrumental form. If you have the soundtrack album, check that song out too.

Duel (1971) (TV)
1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Traveling on the public highways---or not????, 7 July 2007
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I first saw this movie on TNT back on New Year's 1991/92 (actually half of it after browsing channels). I didn't know the title of it at first, but it was very suspenseful and kind of scary. Dennis Weaver played David Mann, who was an everyday man on his way to an out of town business meeting or appointment. At first, everything seems to go normally for David on his journey, but shortly later on, he ends up behind a huge dirty tanker truck spouting black smoke and nasty fumes. David tries to pass the truck, but the driver of the truck seems to want to terrorize David on his journey. Regarding the truck driver, his identity is anonymous; the only things about him that are seen are his cowboy boots and a chunky arm. David continues to try to get away from the driver, but to no avail. He stops at a roadside cafeteria for a bite to eat, and while there, he tries to analyze his situation by figuring out which one of the men inside is the one causing the trouble. He sees a man sitting at a table eating his sandwich (and thinks it's the bad guy because he saw a similar pair of cowboy boots, etc.), and goes to confront the guy. A scuffle happens, and it turns out that the man David confronted was the wrong one (driving away in a different truck--talk about mistaken identity). David leaves the restaurant and continues on with his journey and the victimization of him continues on. He sees a stopped school bus to ask the driver for help, but there was no luck, and the chase resumes. The truck driver then tries to endanger David's life (and car!) at a railroad crossing while a train is passing through, he then stops at a "snake lady's" house to call the authorities, but the driver almost kills David leaving the phone booth, and destroys the snake lady's displays. David gets away, and more trouble happens for him. He sees an elderly couple passing by and asks them to call for help, but they get scared and drive off due to David's reason. Then, his car starts malfunctioning. It starts to smoke, the OIL warning light flashes on and off, etc. Then, at the end, David crashes his car into a cliff, and almost doesn't get it started again, but gets away JUST IN TIME before the trucker slams him. David then comes up with an idea, which is to use his briefcase to push against the accelerator pedal and jumps out letting the car and the trucker crash. We see the trucker's cowboy boots again a couple of times there and his right hand trying to change gears (??), and the truck goes off the cliff. After the dust settled, David then sees from a distance the result of the crash and is pleased that it's over. We see him sitting on the edge of the cliff as the sun sets and the movie ends there. Not a bad movie, but not worth watching for folks who are nervous about driving on the highway. What happened to David afterwards, how he got back home, etc. is unknown (of course, because there is no after in most movies like this). My grade for this movie: C+. Spielberg's directing: A. Dennis Weaver's acting in this movie: A.

2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
My most favorite game show!!!, 10 March 2007
10/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I first saw Pyramid many years ago when I was a little kid (it was the $25,000 show) back when Dick Clark had it. I might have seen it several times on CBS back when it was in production, but I saw it a lot more when the reruns of that and the $100,000 version were on the USA channel. The parts of the show I love to see are the winner's circle rounds, because that is where more excitement is at. It is so wonderful to hear Dick Clark say, "For $10,000/$25,000, here is your first subject. Go!" or "For $100,000, here is your first subject. Go!" if it was during the $100,000 tournaments. I always got a big smile on my face when a contestant won in the winner's circle. When a contestant won $10,000 or $25,000, his or her relatives would come up on stage to congratulate the winner, but when a contestant won $100,000 during the tournament, it would be the entire audience scrambling out of their seats and racing up to the winner's circle. I had learned that the audience never cared about the contestant winning the $100,000, but that they wanted some camera time. But, whatever the reason for it, it was a great way to make the $100,000 wins more exciting. I had just learned that the show has been removed from the GSN lineup. That is very sad to know. I hope it comes back by popular demand; I would love to see a $100,000 win on TV (as it was years ago when I witnessed one on TV). There was a revival of it in 1990 or 1991 with John Davidson as host, but I never saw that and I learned that it wasn't that great. There was another revival of it from 2002-04 with Donny Osmond as host. I loved that one also, even though several of the rules differed from Dick Clark's version and that it was pulled after its 2nd season. I thought Donny Osmond was great as host, also. GSN needs to get this show back on the lineup so that it will be enjoyed by fans for many more years to come.


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