Reviews written by registered user
CatholicPriest

2 reviews in total 
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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:
Good But Confusing, 13 September 2005
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

As a Catholic Priest I was VERY interested in this movie! I have never done an exorcism but I know several priests who have. There are lots of good books & articles on real exorcisms available today & I wish somebody would make a film which reflects the successful outcome of most exorcisms. The case of Annelise Michel (Emily Rose) in Germany in 1976 is one of the saddest cases in the past 2000 years. In addition to having severe medical disorders & possibly being tormented by a dark spiritual force, the young girl also starved herself to death ... & her parents & 2 priests allowed her to do so! The film is really about 2 separate but related true stories: 1)Emily's "possession" by a demon 2)Emily's tragic death by self-starvation. The courtroom scenes do a pretty good job of explaining the differences between medical/psychological disorders & demonic possession. The film does NOT explain why Emily's parents & priests did not get her medical help as soon as she stopped eating. The film implies that this tragic neglect was part of the official Exorcism Rite of the Catholic Church. NO WAY! When priests perform an exorcism (a priest is NEVER allowed to perform an exorcism alone) there is usually a doctor or nurse present who monitors the medical condition of the victim/patient. Some exorcisms are even done in hospitals. Allowing someone to starve herself to death is NOT part of the Rite of Exorcism! It is also an inhumane act of negligence! For an accurate description & text of the Rite of Exorcism, Google-search "Rite of Exorcism" & read for yourself. The movie did make my heart beat a little faster for a few minutes & it made me think ... two things which make a good movie. But I hope people are intelligent enough to realize that most exorcisms have a "happy ending" ... the case of Emily Rose is a rare & very sad exception.

21 out of 36 people found the following review useful:
Good But Confusing, 13 September 2005
7/10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

As a Catholic Priest I was VERY interested in this movie! I have never done an exorcism but I know several priests who have. There are lots of good books & articles on real exorcisms available today & I wish somebody would make a film which reflects the successful outcome of most exorcisms. The case of Annelise Michel (Emily Rose) in Germany in 1976 is one of the saddest cases in the past 2000 years. In addition to having severe medical disorders & possibly being tormented by a dark spiritual force, the young girl also starved herself to death ... & her parents & 2 priests allowed her to do so! The film is really about 2 separate but related true stories: 1)Emily's "possession" by a demon 2)Emily's tragic death by self-starvation. The courtroom scenes do a pretty good job of explaining the differences between medical/psychological disorders & demonic possession. The film does NOT explain why Emily's parents & priests did not get her medical help as soon as she stopped eating. The film implies that this tragic neglect was part of the official Exorcism Rite of the Catholic Church. NO WAY! When priests perform an exorcism (a priest is NEVER allowed to perform an exorcism alone) there is usually a doctor or nurse present who monitors the medical condition of the victim/patient. Some exorcisms are even done in hospitals. Allowing someone to starve herself to death is NOT part of the Rite of Exorcism! It is also an inhumane act of negligence! For an accurate description & text of the Rite of Exorcism, Google-search "Rite of Exorcism" & read for yourself. The movie did make my heart beat a little faster for a few minutes & it made me think ... two things which make a good movie. But I hope people are intelligent enough to realize that most exorcisms have a "happy ending" ... the case of Emily Rose is a rare & very sad exception.