Lists by Simon_Says_Movies

a list of 10 images
Though nobody expects a great movie poster to directly translate to ticket sales or one of poor quality to drive away every last patron, the care taken in a film's promotional campaign speaks volumes to the potential of the movie itself. Though this list shows that these streams do not always run parallel, there is a definite trend. The year is almost through and all posters unveiled to us (and though some great ones like those for Drive, Midnight in Paris and Albert Nobbs didn’t quite make the cut) let’s rack ‘em up and see who takes the bottom prize for 2011 movie posters.
 
a list of 10 images
Though nobody expects a great movie poster to directly translate to ticket sales or one of poor quality to drive away every last patron, the care taken in a film's promotional campaign speaks volumes to the potential of the movie itself. Though this list shows that these streams do not always run parallel, there is a definite trend. The year is almost through and all posters unveiled to us (and though some great ones like those for Drive, Midnight in Paris and Albert Nobbs didn’t quite make the cut) let’s rack ‘em up and see who takes the top prize for 2011 movie posters.
 
a list of 10 titles
Since nearly the origin of cinema, countless filmmakers have aspired to immerse viewers in their world and believe what is on screen. Tracking shots, one-takes and long-takes are all fascinating tools to present a real time, in-your-face experience that bring you along with the characters on screen. Editing is obviously one of the most important discoveries in film, but leaving your camera steady for that little while longer seems to be a lost art.

It pains me not to give just dues to some older examples of these sequences (Rope, Touch of Evil, The Player, to name a very few), but if I were to mention them all I would surely lose your attention upon clip 87. Thusly, let's run down 10 of the best modern tracking shots, in no particular order.
 
a list of 10 titles
Ever since the slasher film became a substantial sub-genre of horror, unlucky soon-to-be-victims have found themselves in isolated surroundings (led by the ominous Camp Crystal Lake in Friday the 13th) without communication or transportation and stalked by an unstoppable force of evil. Director Drew Goddard and writer Joss Whedon add to the collection with the more-than-aptly titled The Cabin in the Woods (there is certainly no mistaking what these two have planned).

What will deviate from the oh-so-familiar formula is that “Cabin” will offer a skewering of the now-clichéd fright flick convention, all while hopefully providing the thrills that made this setting so popular for so long. Although offering a distinctive introspection of the genre, this duo is far from the first to toy with the framework. To celebrate a hopefully entertaining parody, here are 10 of the most unique visions of “the cabin in the woods” trope.
 
a list of 10 titles
One is the loneliest number, it takes two to tango, but is three a crowd? We all know that modern Hollywood is more or less devoid of unique ideas, but one would think rival studios could, at the very least, resist the urge to each unveil a nearly identical film within months of one another—wouldn’t you? 2012 will soon witness such an occurrence with March’s comedic Snow White revamp, Mirror, Mirror, joining this Friday’s gritty Snow White reimagining, Snow White and the Huntsman. It is not only a question of whether or not the market can support two movies carrying such a similar story, but simply if we want two damn movies with the same plot. With the battle looming, let's will run down 10 other epic cinematic showdowns between one flick and its evil cinematic twin (or in some cases twins).
 
a list of 10 titles
Known for it's beaches as much as it is for its Danger, Mexico has also played home to a number of great films. So what are the 10 best films set in Mexico? Let's explore. Vamanos!
 
a list of 189 titles