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runningice_4eva

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2 out of 3 people found the following review useful:
Sparking your Imagination: Sharkboy and Lavagirl, 27 August 2005
5/10

Well, after seeing this film with my younger sister, the only really word that strikes my mind is "original". This movie, although very interesting and original in its own way, reminded me a lot of "The Never Ending Story".

I'm not going to go to "slay" this movie, fair to say that I didn't enjoy it as much as other Rodrigeuz films. But the reason for that is plain and simple...it-is-a-kids-film. The film's story was thought up by Rodrigeuz's seven year old son, Racer. And in those terms the story is very fitting for children of around that age group. My 10 year old sister loved it! And I'm sure many people here would agree that it was a "poor" film, or a "bland" film or a "Rodrigeuz's weakest" film. But simply, the vast majority of every member on this website is above the age required to enjoy this film! It sparked my sisters imagination, and my cousins. So, from a 16 year olds point of view, I'd give this a 5/10. From a child's point of view, I'll give it a 9/10. I'd seriously recommend this film to children below the age of 13, for it was intended for that age range. However, the 3D "gimmick" doesn't really live up to expectation, and it makes the colours of the film very two-tonal (red and green) and I think that the film would be much better if it was just simple 2D. The film is very cheesy, but it's message is received loud and clear and adds a certain "feel good" factor to the movie. To adults that factor may be "thank god its over", to children, it'll be so much more awe inspiring and imaginative! Your kids will most likely start keeping dream journals and invent characters of a similar calibre to Lavagirl and Sharkboy! A film that re-defines imagination as being something that should be open, outspoken and above all cherished. Something that is becoming increasingly rare with children, due to the steady rise of "video games", "TV shows" and "Films",