Lists by Mighty_Emperor

a list of 306 titles
Films with ninjas, that is all. Oh and TV shows.

There are names you should keep an eye out for - Sho Kosugi became famous playing ninjas during the 80s ninja boom, Michael Dudikoff the American Ninja and Godfrey Ho is famous for weird Frankenstein flicks often include ninjas (and are so awful they usually need to be seen to be believed - to filter him out sort by quality, all his films should then be at the end of the list). Ignoring Ho's films, there are less Chinese ninja movies but those that exist are some of the best.

See also: jidaigeki, crazy kung-fu horror films and extreme Japanese films.

Further reading: the official ninja homepage.
 
a list of 82 titles
Film or TV containing an occult detective[1], usually involving someone in law enforcement or an academic or a journalist who either investigates a mundane event that leads them into dark and strange depths or they are already interested in the topic and specifically seek it out.

Intriguingly, while this cross-genre is a popular source for film and especially TV, most of the original characters that inspired them haven't themselves been adapted, like Carnacki[2] (Martin Hesselius or John Silence or Flaxman Low or Jules de Grandin or John Thunstone or Simon Iff or pretty much everyone except Van Helsing). It seems that with the success of Sherlock and Steampunk or Victorian/Edwardian fiction being popular now might be the time - someone should phone Mark Gatiss.

See also: I have an archaeological adventurer list, which has some crossover with this list, as well as being another well-known archetype. I also started the keyword occult detective on here and added most of the titles to it.

Further reading: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/OccultDetective

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occult_detective_fiction
[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnacki

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 145 titles
Paranoia-inducing tales of covert invasion. This might be alien infiltration or they might come from... elsewhere. Basically anything that might keep David Icke up awake at night (hmm I should probably add "V" in there too).

So the key elements are infiltration, subversion, stealth colonisation and human disguise/mimicry, with the invaders hiding in plain sight.
 
a list of 2,024 titles
I've been trying to dance around this as it'll be a monster list but... ah well, it was inevitable.

This list is based on an earlier list that I compiled which has done the rounds online, which was brought together from various sources, including a number of the books in the references section (the earlier ones obviously, the original list was from 2004-2005). For this list I have also worked through the IMDB "zombie" tag but I have also been much stricter with my inclusion criteria and have left out films I've previously included, focusing this list on the mindless undead (who became cannibalistic following Romero's Night of the Dead). The films I've left out have been shifted over into parallel lists especially the one contagious violence films, like the 28 X Later ones and The Crazies that are often lumped in with zombie films but don't have the dead being reanimated. Plus there is a vengeful dead list for films where the dead only return for revenge, rather than brains. The focus is mainly on live action films but there are some animated films included where I felt that they were important or just amused me. I have watched about a third of these films so far, so there will be quite a bit of chopping and changing as I work through the rest because this is not only subjective but there might be a few that don't belong at all (probably quite a few from the "zombie" tag on IMDB). So bear with me, this is a work in progress.

Sub-lists: if you want a more focused, less sprawling lists: Asian zombie films, British zombie films, period zombie films and zombie Nazi/Nazi zombie films. There is also one for films from the zombie's point-of-view (or at least they present a sympathetic portrayal of zombies). I also thought it'd be interesting to break the films down by title because there are so many of them with a few high-profile movies that set the standard: Night of the Living X, X of the Dead and X vs Zombies, meanwhile someone else has a list for titles of the format X zombies (so I won't start one for that, as I nearly did before finding it, unless it starts getting outdated). As films flagged as porn negatively impacts on a list's visibility, I have started a list for zombie porn.

Numbers: I have made a new spreadsheet and graph based on this list of zombie films, as you can see the first 3 Romero zombie films led to a big spike in zombie films (after a 4-5 year lag) which fell off quickly afterwards. However, the most recent 3 of his Dead series come in a period of sustained growth that started in 2003 (two years before the first of those three, Land of the Dead) making it difficult attribute the films to any upswings. You might be better of looking at the success of 28 Days Later or Shaun of the Dead (which seem to have given British horror films and British zombie movies a boost), but a better explanation might be the lowering of the bar to film production and distribution - zombies not necessarily requiring a lot of cash (but it can help), so lending themselves to low budget films. This can be most easily demonstrated by the fact that there have been nearly as many full-length zombie films released in the seven years between 2006-2012 (567) as there were in all the years before that (582).

See also: mummy movies, Frankenstein films and Chinese hopping vampire films (which, despite the name, are just another class of zombie).

References: The Zombie Movie Encyclopedia (2000), The Dead Walk (2000, new edition 2009), Eaten Alive!: Italian Cannibal and Zombie Movies (2002), Book of the Dead: The Complete History of Zombie Cinema (2005), Zombiemania: 80 Movies To Die For (2006), Zombie Movies: The Ultimate Guide (2008), The G.O.R.E. Score: A Review Guide to All Things Zombie, Volume 1, and Volume 2 (2010 and 2011) and Blood Splatter: A Guide to Cinematic Zombie Violence, Gore and Special Effects (2012).

Further reading: Gospel of the Living Dead: George Romero's Visions of Hell on Earth (2006), The Undead and Philosophy: Chicken Soup for the Soulless (2006), Zombie Culture: Autopsies of the Living Dead (2008), Night of the Living Dead: Behind the Scenes of the Most Terrifying Zombie Movie Ever (2010), Generation Zombie: Essays on the Living Dead in Modern Culture (2011), Better Off Dead: The Evolution of the Zombie as Post-Human (2011), The Complete History of the Return of the Living Dead (2011), and Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Zombies (2011).

Links: Websites that I found handy in refining this list include: A French zombie review blog, translated (has a similar breakdown to the one I use here, also made me finally look up the word "nanar" - a film so bad it's good, they really do have a word for everything) and Xzombi a zombie movie database (as the ZMDB is down for maintenance).

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 279 titles
Films that are adaptations of Lovecraft's work or inspired by him or could fit in his vast Cthulhu Mythos or feature him as a character. Obviously, this gets a bit subjective at the fringes but is all the better for it.

Further reading: The Complete H.P. Lovecraft Filmography (2001) and Lurker in the Lobby: The Guide to the Cinema of H. P. Lovecraft (2006).

Links: The HP Lovecraft Film Festival and Unfilmable: Cosmic Horror Cinema

Removed: Kuro no dansho, a Lovecraftian hentai that doesn't appear to be that porny but it can't be added to this list.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 216 titles
Often very similar to zombie movies but the dead aren't reanimated, instead some kind of "infection" turns the population into raging cannibals.

Despite not ticking all the boxes for a zombie film there is plenty of crossover (especially as The Last Man on Earth inspired Romero's zombies) and a fan of the undead should be just fine with these too, especially as classifying them separately from zombies means any extra abilities (like running fast, and even free running) won't be too jarring. Most are worth a rental although some, like almost all the I Am Legend adaptations, 28 X Later, The Crazies, Quarantine and Pontypool are good enough to seek out.

See also: The vengeful dead (another group of films often grouped with zombie films) and contagion (for films where a lot of people get sick and just die). There is also they walk amongst us for more subtle takeovers (as some of the films on this list involve infection by an alien virus or parasite in order to violently take over the world - see Slither as a good example)

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 41 titles
A sub-section of body horror movies, that deal with killer babies, freakish pregnancies and other birth-related strangeness. Films that put the 'terror' in 'teratology'.

Further reading: Womb Monsters slideshow and Scahill, Andrew (2010) "Deviled Eggs: Teratogenesis and the Gynecological Gothic in the Cinema of Monstrous Birth." in Bienstock Anolik, Ruth (ed.) Demons of the Body and Mind: Essays on Disability in Gothic Literature. McFarland. Pages 197-216. ISBN 978-0-7864-3322-3.

See also: Someone else has a list for evil kids, if you want to know what happens when these terrible tykes grow-up (hint: nothing good).
 
a list of 566 titles
Crazy, out-there and weird films and TV - media to make your head hurt.

Films that deal with memory, identity, reality with drugs, time travel and body-swapping. In fact, movies that will make you question your sanity and/or that of everyone you come into contact with.

There are some on the list who appear again and again, so you can be sure that most films by Lynch, Jodorowsky, Cronenberg, Gilliam, Greenaway and Anger are worth tracking down for their strangeness, as are adaptations of works by people like Philip K. Dick.

This list came about from my search for the weirdest films, granted there are surrealist films on here but the bulk come from filmmakers going out and making the films they want to make. Without too close an eye on them from the studios and with apparently little regard for the audience's tastes (or sanity) they can sometimes hit moments of truly transcendental madness that can be better than drugs (or at the very least similar). Where you get that sudden suspicion that you might have gone mad and what you are seeing on the screen is really being projected from inside your head.

See also: crazy horror films, weird Japanese films, crazy kung fu horror films and time travel films.

The removed: Weird porn films that'd cause problem with the list: Baby Sitter, Sinful Dwarf, Ginger's Sex Asylum and Angel Above - The Devil Below. Hypertrophy Genitals Girl is currently not listed here.
 
a list of 145 titles
Often lumped in with zombie movies but these corpses come back from the grave not as mindless cannibalistic brutes, but with one thing in mind: revenge.

In the Cabin the Woods the chief monsters are the Zombie Redneck Torture Family (the Buckners), and the CitW wiki describes them in a way which pretty much defines the list:


They are portraited [sic] as rotten, putrid undead human beings, but having some level of cognition beyond of that of a normal zombie. Also, they are clearly shown to have a delight for torturing their victims before killing them. Sitterson points out that they belong to a completely different category to normal zombies


See also: Contagious violence (another group of films often included with zombie films).

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 104 titles
The Internet Archive is well-known for the Wayback Machine it hosts and they also have a very large selection of public domain media*, relevant to IMDB are the films they have and this is a list designed to bring together the science-fiction ones. I largely made the list for myself, so I could keep a track of some of these early classics as I work through their catalogue (some are classic for being good, others for being so bad they are good and some are just bad) but I'm making it public as I'm sure there are other people out there who'd be interest - if nothing else you can grab the bad ones, some beer, some friends and hold your own MST3K (a number of them have appeared on the show). Although it is worth noting that not all of the lowest rated ones here appear in the Bottom 100 because they don't have the 1,500 votes needed to qualify - so get watching and get voting, the world need to seem some of these gems!!

The better known PD ones are available on some dirt cheap DVDs - I have quite a few on triple feature DVDs selling for £1 and there are 50 film boxsets selling for very little, most of them are worth the 30p/20 cents you'd pay for them, although free is better.

So here you'll find some early classic sci-fi, quite a few movie/TV serials, the excellent Quatermass, a couple of Soviet sci-fi flicks, the first 4 Gamera films and other giant monster movies, as well as some of the worst films ever made, which often makes them must-sees (e.g. Plan 9 From Outer Space). This covers 10+ decades of movie-making, so there must be something in there to catch your fancy.

See also: the equivalent list for horror movies, there is some crossover with science-fiction/horror films so I've tended to include them in both. I've also started a similar list for public domain martial arts films

Further reading: If you want to track down other PD films outside of these genres then a good place to start is Wikipedia's list of public domain films in the US, which also explains the situation. Their page on public domain films has a wider focus. There are numerous sites offering public domain films but I can't really vouch for their checks (just Google them up), however, for horror there is Openflix's sci-fi & fantasy section.

* I can't check the copyright status of each one but they are pretty diligent (although not perhaps as careful as the Gutenberg Project, but they might be being over cautious some times) so there are unlikely to be any legal issues, although you'd want to check the copyright situation in your own country to be sure (America has longer copyright period than somewhere like Australia, for example. So if you go by what is available in the US you should be fine). There are other places online with PD films but IA is the most trustworthy source.

NB: IMDB does include links to the Internet Archive videos on a few entries, but not all. I'll see what I can do about fixing that at some point but feel free to scoop up the links here and add them to the entries.
 
a list of 201 titles
The name seems to have been coined, in this context, by Mark Gatiss in A History of Horror: "Home Counties Horror" to cover those films where the terror seems to well up from the countryside - Pan-ic in the woods. It draws on the spooky sensibilities of M.R. James and Algernon Blackwell but the godfather of urban horror is surely Arthur Machen. More modern exponents include Alan Garner, but overshadowing all others is Nigel Kneale, who repeatdely went out of his way to demonstrate the British countryside wasn't as tamed as we'd hoped.

About the list: All the films and television programs are in year order, then I added a few documentaries on the end which might be a useful place to look for some real folk horror. As you'll see I have slightly extended the definition to more than the British countryside because all countries have their ancient traditions that can well up and catch out the unwary city dwellers - you can see a definite trend in American films for witches/warlocks jumping out of bushes in the rural US and in 2010 you can see a large surge in such films from outside the Anglophone areas that dominate the list (with a strong showing for European films where the woods have always been deep, dark and menacing). If you are only after countryside terror in Blighty then it is easy enough to filter out other offerings (you'll find the first half of the list dominated by them, including all the classics).

Further reading: If you want to read more on this then try folkhorror.com, which helped me track down the names of the more unusual items, as did Folk Horror Review. John Smith has helped fill in some gaps too, by generously sharing his research. This is also a useful guide, it is only the first instalment, so I'll update when part two is out. I'd also recommend Janet Bord's Fairies: Real Encounters With Little People which gives an excellent overview of fairylore from early times to the present day (and has a nice section on the way it merges seamlessly into alien encounters).

See also: If you were interested in offerings further east, then check out my other lists as, for example, "Crazy kung-fu horror films", deals with the Chinese films that often demonstrate the fear of the dark magics that lurk in the jungles of South East Asia or are based on monsters from their own myths, and my Eternal Evils of Asia does something similar from the southern Asia perspective. Also, as noted below, folk horror has quite a lot of similarities with backwoods horror / rural survival films (rural setting and sinister, unfriendly locals) but I have tried to keep the two lists as separate as possible.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 84 titles
The strangest horror movies out there. The kind where you get genuinely worried for the sanity of the film-makers, then you start worrying you've gone mad and imagined it all. Or you might question the wisdom of their going for an unlikely monster - a pinata? Is that wise? Apparently not.

Further reading: 25 Strange and Ridiculous Horror Movie Villains

See also: Bonkers, crazy kung fu horror films, New Japanese Gore, witches with flying heads and monstrous births.

The removed: Angel Above - The Devil Below, another "killer vagina" film, this one flagged as porn so it can't be added to the list.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 138 titles
If it is out east and features the living dead, it's in here. I thought it worth grouping them together as they tend not to stick so closely to the zombie movie tropes and cliches, so can often come up with something original (and often jaw-dropping).

About the list: It is always tricky knowing where to draw the line but to stop unnecessary replication Chinese hopping vampires are in my other list "Crazy kung-fu horror films" unless they also feature obvious zombies too (the key to the films are resurrected corpses, which can turn into dangerous vampires if something goes wrong). I will be splitting up the list by country China/Hong Kong first, then Japan and then others on the end - within the countries I'll be ordering them chronologically. I will mainly be including films I've seen as I can guarantee what is in them, if not I'll flag it.

See also: There is also some crossover with the extreme Japanese films list, and the sub-list of it on the New Japanese Gore films. British zombie films another regional breakdown of zombie movies.

Removed: Beautiful Dead Body, "adult" films in a list can reduce its visibility.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 71 titles
Horror and peril in the cold, with mounds of snow and lashings of ice.

There is clearly some solid crossover with Christmas horror.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 74 titles
Contrasting with the films on my contagious violence list (and, beyond them, zombie movies), sometimes people don't turn into rampaging cannibals when they get a disease, sometimes a lot of people just get sick and die, messily. This is the list for those films, because sometimes it is fun to kick back and watch a film where someone bleeds to death from their ass.

Although the outbreak can be relatively limited, these often deal with pandemics and so grade into apocalyptic movies.

This isn't a complete survey (there are always more) but it does seem like there are more of these films recently, perhaps because of the concerns over SARS and the various flus (avian and swine). Hopefully, these cathartic excursions are the closest most of us get to such modern plagues.
 
a list of 331 titles
Does what it says on the tin, films that tend to fall into the 'torture porn' category.

However, what I thought would be interesting is to look back on other films before Hostel and Saw that also delivered over-the-top, unflinching depictions of ultraviolence to see the history of this sub-genre. The films on this list are typified by a relentless, bludgeoning brutality that, if you are lucky, delivers a cathartic experience. What they usually aren't is actual porn (although some are borderline, just don't expect porn with BDSM here) as the "porn" in torture porn is from a different meaning of the word, as nicely outlined by wiktionary:


3. (uncountable, slang) a collection of images of something desirable, such as "car porn" or "gun porn".


What putting the mid to late-2000s films in context demonstrates is that there wasn't a sudden step change in such films but they are part of a continuum. The real change is that these are American films with higher budgets and more market penetration. This means that what has bubbled away off the radar of normal civilised folks has come bubbling up into the mainstream. The problem is that these larger budgets means they still have to be accessible, which means they need to include story, plot and character development. So, while being more entertaining, they also can't possible include the unrelenting cruelty that you'd find in the low budget US flicks or the films from Continental Europe and East Asia which I include here (films which do deserve being called 'torture porn'). If you have Saw or Hostel in your "Top Ten Sickest Flicks" list then you really need to watch more of the films below, just make sure you space them out and schedule a few weeks recovery time between viewings.

Oddly while I expected to feel a little shaken by compiling this list, as the memories came flooding back, I was surprised that I also got a little nostalgic. A lot of the early films and documentaries were shared around on worn VHS tapes like samizdat literature and allowed a safe one for people to test their limits and flirt with the grim realities of mortality. Unfortunately, life has a way of showing you that there are things out there that are far worse and horrifying for very different reasons and these films don't hold my interest as they did in the past. I have watched quite a few of the recent offerings to see what the fuss is about but have largely been underwhelmed (on the violence front, they are fairly entertaining) but I doubt I'll be watching A Serbian Film, for example, not because it is depraved and revolting but because... life is too short and there are plenty of other films I do want to watch.

You'll find quite a bit of crossover with my lists: backwoods horror / rural survival films, video nasties and those on my extreme Japanese films list.

See also: The Splat Pack and their films, the creators of many of the key films that would get labelled as 'torture porn,' even if it isn't a term they like. As Eli Roth has explained "I find the whole notion of torture porn insulting. People assume these are movies made by idiots for idiots. They're not. These films are very subversive." And he is right, if you are looking for sick depraved films then, as I say above, look elsewhere as these films have a story and actual subtext. However, it is a catchy label. In addition see the New French Extremity list, which is a group of French films and film-makers who are pushing the envelope of what is acceptable in number of different directions, including violence. Someone else has a list for Roughies, which combine hardcore sex with violence.

Excluded: As mentioned above I am not including porn with violence (it also reduces list visibility) but there exampes worth mentioning as they support some of the above comments, like the Japanese series Eccentric Psycho Cinema: #1: Bottled Vulva: Bank Teller Noriko and #3: Female Body Collection: Stewardess Risa, there are at least eight in the series, but I can only find those.

Further reading: A History of Gore and Splatter in Cinema and The Story Behind Torture Porn.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 267 titles
Films with time travel in them.

One thing that didn't strike me until I made this list - quite how many Star Trek films involve time travel.

Further reading: The Best and Worst Time Travel Movies.

See also: Bonkers (as quite a few strange films involve time travel)

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 155 titles
Giant monster films from Japan, and others from elsewhere inspired by them. I also threw in the Ultra Series but haven't tried to be too completest on the television front. I've also not included every giant monster movie (there was a fad for them in America during the mid-20th Century), focusing instead on Japanese films and their imitators. There is already a more general giant monster movie list or this wider-ranging one.

See also: my weird Japanese films list

Further reading: Kaijuphile. Digital Monster Island is an attempt to collect together reviews of the various kaiju film releases. This page has the technical details of Toho's kaiju, except Godzilla.
 
a list of 69 titles
The ancient astronaut theory as depicted on the big and small screen. These theory was popularised by Erich von Däniken and have been a strong influence on popular culture since.

Although a popular theme in early science fiction but it was first laid out clearly by Charles Fort in 1919's Book of the Damned, where he said:


I think we're property.

I should say we belong to something:

That once upon a time, this earth was No-man's Land, that other worlds explored and colonized here, and fought among themselves for possession, but that now it's owned by something:

...

I suspect that, after all, we're useful -- that among contesting claimants, adjustment has occurred, or that something now has a legal right to us, by force, or by having paid out analogues of beads for us to former, more primitive, owners of us -- all others warned off -- that all this has been known, perhaps for ages, to certain ones upon this earth, a cult or order, members of which function like bellwethers to the rest of us, or as superior slaves or overseers, directing us in accordance with instructions received -- from Somewhere else -- in our mysterious usefulness.

But I accept that, in the past, before proprietorship was established, inhabitants of a host of other worlds have -- dropped here, hopped here, wafted, sailed, flown, motored -- walked here, for all I know -- been pulled here, been pushed; have come singly, have come in enormous numbers; have visited occasionally, have visited periodically for hunting, trading, replenishing harems, mining: have been unable to stay here, have established colonies here, have been lost here; far-advanced peoples, or things, and primitive peoples or whatever they were


The films listed here draw on such themes - aliens visiting Earth in the past, people in the "present day" (which might include the future) find evidence for that aliens have been here before, etc.

Further reading: As you are reading this I'll assume you'll be familiar with Von Danicken's theories, so for some background and balance you might want to try: Space Gods Revealed by Ronald Story and Some Trust in Chariots! by E.W. Castle and B.B. Thiering.There is also the more recent The Cult of Alien Gods by Jason Colavito which argues that Von Daniken's ideas are lifted from HP Lovecraft via Morning of the Magicians, so is a little more... focused than the other too and I'd quibble that it downplays the influence of Fort (and I wonder about A. Merritt's impact in this area, as he had direct Theosophical links, as well as a deeper knowledge of occult matters which Lovecraft lacked). You can get a taste for the direction he goes in by reading his earlier piece "Charioteers of the Gods."

Links: Ancient Aliens, Part One and Two, a look at the topic in science fiction films. Ancient Astronauts at the Secret Sun where Christopher Knowles teases out AAT themes in pop culture.

See also: They Live Amongst Us about aliens in disguise on Earth now.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 268 titles
Films that generally fall into the "zombie" category, which for this list I'm keeping pretty loose, so as well as your classic zombie movies, it includes what I'm calling contagious violence, like the 28 X Later films, and the vengeful dead.

The British zombie movie is important in the history of the genre because they helped keep the flame alive and would, in turn, influence George Romero who was inspired by them (and many others movies) when coming up with Night of the Living Dead, as explained by Jennnifer Dotson in her Ma thesis:


In the fifties, science fiction had surpassed horror in popularity in Hollywood, and Gothic monsters such as vampire, werewolves, and mummies were traded in for giant insects, killer vegetables, and alien invaders. After the influx of poorly constructed zombie-themed films in the 1950s failed at the box office, most Hollywood producers abandoned the zombie altogether. When it seemed the living dead were indeed a dying breed in Hollywood, the zombie film was given a new life abroad. As a result of Hollywood's cold shoulder, the zombie was relocated and began to flourish in other countries, particularly in Great Britain and Mexico. British films like Doctor Blood's Coffin (1960) and The Earth Dies Screaming (196), although low budget, helped the zombie genre gain popularity in Great Britain during a horror revival there in the 1960s. Hammer Studios, the leading producer of horror films in Great Britain, released a zombie film in 1966 called Plague of the Zombies. Although the film is not well know, having been overshadowed by more successful Hammer endeavours, it is notable for giving the zombie an international stage.


Given the fact that there was a small homegrown tradition of such films before NotLD, it is odd that it took so long for we Brits to get in on the trend, once the game changed and the sub-genre too off, as outlined by British horror historian MJ Simpson:


it took a long time for zombie films to take hold in the UK. If we skip over the 'walking dead' in the Terence Fisher sci-fi opus The Earth Dies Screaming and those in Hammer's pre-Romero The Plague of the Zombies, we find (unless we're prepared to really bend the definition) a complete dearth of the living dead in British film-making until Andrew Parkinson's I, Zombie: The Chronicles of Pain in 1998. Throughout the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s there were zombie films made in the USA and Europe but the closest we got to British zombies was Jorg Grau and his Manchester Morgue, which was shot in the UK but is, in real terms, a Spanish film. It just never occurred to anyone making British horror features - at any level - to try to put Romero-esque zombies into British genre culture.


He then goes on to touch on the two key British "zombie" movies:


after that brace of indie undead, it was two much bigger studio productions which really established the UK as a suitable home for zombies. 28 Days Later was released in 2002; Shaun of the Dead two years later - yet even at this short remove they seem to have appeared together, solidly establishing the United Kingdom as a place where the dead walk.


They weren't just locally important but would help revitalise the whole sub-genre and are a vital part of the push that helped make zombies mainstream and now almost ubiquitous.

Links: UK films at the Zombie Movie List

See also: The British horror renaissance - there were zombie films before this but the recent upsurge in Brit horror has seen an explosion in the number of zombie movies. Asian zombie films is another regional breakdown of these kinds of movies.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 2,545 titles
Inspired by this piece from the Garudian:


Interest in homegrown horror was rekindled by Danny Boyle's film 28 Days Later in 2002 and grew with the success of Shaun of the Dead, Neil Marshall's The Descent and Christopher Smith's two films Creep and Severance.


So this list deals with the last decade (and counting) revival in the fortunes of the British horror movie (you can monitor new releases here, and there is one for short films), I'm sure the creative people were out there but it was 28 Days Later than got the purse strings loosened. Defining "British" is always going to be subjective, Hammer, for example, made a return in 2007 but some of the films they've produced have been co-productions filmed abroad (like Let Me In), but we'll include them as this this list is partly to show the strength of the British film industry when it comes to horror films. For that reason I will also include movies filmed in the UK as it all helps bolster the home-grown efforts (like World War Z).

Of course, that isn't to say that all these films are great, some of them are awful, but the level of quality is higher than I've found on most of my other lists.

Also making 2002 a cut-off is pretty arbitrary as it includes Dog Soldiers and Deathwatch that can't have benefited much from the 28 Days Later effect, and it excludes many interesting films that pre-date it, like The Bunker and Lighthouse, but it is still a good line in the sand if we want to look at recent British horror films and it does seem to be a genuine phenomena.

See also: Contagious violence, it shouldn't be a surprise, given the film that kickstarted everything that a lot of the films here also feature over there but the sub-genre (and zombie films) are easy to do with simple make-up and effects, and there is also an explosion in them in general. Also hoodie horror films feature strongly as a reflection of modern concerns. In addition there are quite a few films that fit into the backwoods horror and folk horror, both of which are undergoing a resurgence too (both of which can also be done on a limited budget). In fact, in most sub-genres I've been tracking, a big hit film has combined with improved distribution and cheaper technology to give a spike in the number of films produced.

Links: British horror revival blog from MJ Simpson, the co-founder of SFX magazine and the author of the upcoming book Urban Terrors: New British Horror Cinema 1997-2008, a guide to the 114 key films of that period. I only found it part-way through making the list but it has proved invaluable for filling in the gaps here (it also helped confirm I was on the right lines with the list name), so if you like this list follow his blog and be sure to pick up his book (if it goes well there is chance of a sequel - there are clearly going to be more films in the few years after 2008 than in the decade before). He has also provided round-ups of the releases in 2010 and 2011, noting that in 2001 there were 3 British horror films but in 2010 there were 48 (the 2010 round-up only includes 32 because he discovered more afterwards) and in 2011 there were 41 (not counting further revisions), my count below is different but the proportions are similar. There were more again in 2012, 14 of them zombie films, more than one a month and more than the annual total for most years (in fact so many I made a list for British zombie films). Which does flag up that something is going on here. Frightfest is also worth keeping an eye on, it is the UK's leading horror film festival (I have yet to attend but I will one day) with a strong focus on British movies and, even if you can't make it, because it is run in conjunction Film4, they run a week's worth of films and interviews on their TV channel (it is where I first heard about Kill List, for example).

The count: I have gone through and counted all the full length British horror films and put them into a spreadsheet and graph.

Which really does show an upwards trend, from less than one a month to one ever 3 days, just in the noughties - rapidly passing the levels of the boom period for British horror: the 60s and 70s. If you look back further you'll see that horror film production in the 90s were often down to similar levels to the early 50s when we were shaking off the effects of a world war (the chilling effect of the video nasty era? after all hardline BBFC chief James Ferman retired in 1999 and it was only then that a lot of the banned movies started to be passed uncut). A really impressive upswing , although it makes it impossible to keep up with all of them even if you wanted to. However, the number do suggest the renaissance was under way before 28DL, even if the success of films like it (Shaun of the Dead, etc.) have inspired film-makers and made financiers take British horror films seriously, helping to build momentum. I'd also flag up my comments above, as the growth in some horror sub-genres parallels what we see here, suggesting that the ease of film-making and distribution now means there will be more films but there is also clear evidence for successful films have an important effect on the types of films being made (the best example of zombie films - the first 3 Romero films created a spike in zombie movies with a lag of a year or two - I have rather a fine graph to prove my point).

I did also stumble across this piece about horror fiction and Tory governments:


A cursory glance at the points where horror fiction did enjoy periods of resurgence do tend to follow an upward graph with Tory fortunes.

...

Now, after two years of government by coalition of the Conservatives and the Lib Dems, horror is on the rise again.


So we can see a big spike in British horror films after 2010 (a jump of 50%) but there is usually a lag of a few years between inspiration and realisation, plus the Thatcher/Major years (1979-1997) saw a real dip in output between high points of the 60s/70s and the current upswing. So I'm not buying this when it comes to films, and if we are talking about fiction then... show me your numbers - I've shown you mine after all.

Caveats: There could be a recentist bias to an internet movie data base but IMDB has been going since 1990, so you'd imagine that'd be smoothed out by now and the British horror film industry isn't that large, but does attract a lot of rabid fans, so you'd imagine it'd be difficult for too many films to fall through the gaps. The opposite might also be a problem - there might be a bias against more recent movies as it can take a while for information to trickle through. However, this seems to largely apply to tagging and working out what sub-genres films fit into which are user added features and can be a bit arbitrary and subjective, while the location of production company is going to be a well-defined fact and much more likely to be properly registered here when the film is added (I have found a couple of examples so far when compiling this list, but not many). So I suspect neither is so serious to make a mockery of the numbers, as is a big enough sample that a few films won't make any difference (famous last words, I'm sure). One factor I do think might have an impact on the current year peak is that I've already seen some unreleased films shifted back to the following year or just whenever. So I expect the patter of each year is the peak will grow, as the full slate of films in production becomes clear, and then it will drop a bit as some get rescheduled or disappear into development hell, never to be seen again. Which means the current year is always going to be provisional until we reach the end and perhaps do a little tidy up too, so there might be a drop off of a dozen or so, but that might be compensated for after the inclusion of some films that might not get listed here until they're released.

Other films: There are some adult films that I'm wary of listing as they seem to cause problems for the list: Cathula 2: Vampires of Sex.

Length: Sorry it is a long list and this might be a little off-putting but you can use the filters to break it down if you don't want to browse through all the pages (even if I recommend you do it at least once). So you can, for example, rank only the feature films by quality if you were perhaps looking some of the better movies on the list to watch (even then you should do your homework, because some obscure films don't have many votes which can lead to people gaming the system).

Videos: I've tried to provide links to online videos of films where they appear to be official, if you want me to add a video or remove/swap a link then leave a note in the comments.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 37 titles
High-rise horror, action and thrillers.

The plot usually involves someone having to fight their way up to the top of a block or fight their way down and out. Common set pieces include room-to-room fighting and poorly lit corridors, so I've also included films set in larger apartment buildings, which has a very similar feel even if they aren't as far off the ground (although far enough that the fall would be lethal).

The theme has become popular for zombie films and their cousins amongst the contagiously violent, as it takes the siege element introduced in Night of the Living Dead (which was heavily influenced by The Last Man on Earth) and raises the stakes to new heights.

See also: Hoodie horror, which often takes place in tower blocks. In addition, Don't Ever Get in the Elevator! is a list of lift/elevator-based films (not my list but I know the creator). Although it might seem the opposite of subterranean horror, there are some films that are essential set in inverted tower blocks, like Resident Evil and Fortress.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 141 titles
Films about people creating a patchwork zombie. This might also include Dr Frankenstein's further adventures an metafictional tales about the writing of the original story.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 34 titles
Zombie porn - yes the dead get stiff and erect, then the shagging starts. So this list contains porn with zombies in them, as well as a couple of zombie films where the location is an adult movie set (yes there is more than one).

I had to split this list off from my main zombie list, because the porn filter reduces a lists visibility. The surprise isn't that there are some, but that there are enough to support a list. Now I've not seen any of these (although I interviewed Rob Black about Porn of the Dead, which got lifted to use as the name of the list), but zombies having sex can't really be a turn-on. Can it?

This film also contains a couple of Chinese hopping vampire porn films, as they are related and there is some crossover in Beautiful Dead Body. The same with Frankenstein and mummy porn.

Further reading: Zombie Porn 1.0: or, Some Queer Things Zombie Sex Can Teach Us, a lengthy and ambitious analysis of Otto; or, Up with Dead People that says "Here we focus on what we call 'zombie porn,' a heretofore largely neglected if also still emergent subgenre of a much larger zombie corpus." It is this (rotting?) body of work that we focus on here. They continue: "We tie our discussions of pornography, zombiephilia, and necropolitics to recent discussions in queer studies about futurity, normativity, and political possibility. Zombies are kin to queers: they are always already quasi-pornographic bodies opened up to the world in unexpected or unconventional ways; they add to their numbers through contagion and recruitment (in malls, public parks, the local bar, the armed services, the big city, the small town, or the domestic bedroom); and they stand in for a world overrun by a ravenous multitude, a world without a future." Blimey! You may also be interested in The Big List o' Zombie Porn v2.1 , which has a broader remit than this list, including sexual scenes, softcore films as well as hardcore pornography (its coverage of this last topic isn't as complete as this list, but it is handy if you want to expand your focus to other areas of necrohumping naughtiness).

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 146 titles
Yakuza films.

They have gone through a number of stages:

* Beginning - although most of the pre-WWII films are missing, some like Chuji Tabinikki Daisanbu Goyohen, are still being found.

* Ninkyo eiga - chivalry films in the 1960s, with Seijun Suzuki being one of the more prominent directors, until he got sacked for getting too experimental, and Ken Takakura being a well-known face in front of the camera.

* Jitsuroku eiga - docudrama films in the 1970s, as typified by Kinji Fukasaku films, like Battles Without Honor and Humanity, usually set in the post-War period.

* Resurgence - yakuza films went off the radar in the 1980s and returned in the 90s thanks to prolific directors like Takeshi Kitano and Takashi Miike, the latter pushing the films into increasingly strange areas (while still delivering more conventional takes on the genre).

Further reading: Mark Schilling (2003). The Yakuza Movie Book : A Guide to Japanese Gangster Film.

See also: Jidaigeki for period Japanese films (with which there is some crossover with this list).

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 117 titles
Zombie films with a title using the format "X of the Dead" (as well as "X of the Living Dead").

There is also a Porn of the Dead, which I can't add here, because it'd reduce list visibility, but it is on my zombie porn list.

Although most of the later films are riffs on Romero's first two films (Dorm of the Dead, Night of the Little Dead, etc.) this form of film name predates them, first appearing with 1965's Orgy of the Dead.

See also: vs Zombies and Night of the Living two more lists of mine that deal with other popular forms of zombie movie title. Someone else has an X Zombies list where X = ninjas, cowboys, etc.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 171 titles
Films with the bandaged type of mummy, not your mom. From Universal and Hammer's films to Aztec mummies fighting masked Mexican wrestlers (in the 60s and 70s, if you were either a Mexican wrestler or a mummy, you couldn't nip down to the local store without meeting and fighting a member of the other group). This sub-genre tends to be relatively easy to keep separate from zombie films, as while the dead are reanimated they usually tend to less cannibalistic (and rarely hang around in great swarms), but there is a little crossover, especially when we aren't dealing with an Egyptian mummy but a well-preserved corpse that gets reanimated.

At the turn-of-the-century Egyptology was all the rage and Howard Carter's 1922 discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamen only threw fuel on the fire, with The Curse adding the necessary dark edge to turn what was often a comedy genre into horror (at least until the spoofs and parodies started).

Bram Stoker's The Jewel of Seven Stars has proved a popular one in this field, being adapted a number of times.

See also: zombie films and the vengeful dead as there are plenty of similarities, especially with the latter. Archaeological adventurers a list of Indiana Jones-style films, which has some crossover with this one (most obviously the recent "The Mummy" series).

Further reading: This list and this one are pretty comprehensive and I haven't yet caught it out (it even helped me fill in some blanks), although I might quibble over the inclusion of Dr Phibes in the first one (but perhaps I need to watch it again). You might also enjoy The Ancient Egypt Film Site, which has a section for mummy films (which gives handy summaries).

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 61 titles
A mash-up of war and horror films. Here we'll deal with soldiers confronting some kind of supernatural horror.

War by its very nature is horrific so adding a horror element in can help throw this into greater contrast or the horror can act as a metaphor - for the pointless of the whole venture or for man's struggle against overwhelming odds. Or it could just be an easy excuse to blow the crap out of a bunch of monsters with some serious firepower, and there is nothing wrong with that (except, as a strategy, it is usually flawed).

See also: My Nazi zombie list, they are usually relics of the war so often don't count here, and Nazi occult films for their more paranormal shenanigans.
 
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Nazisploitation meets zombies - what's not to "love" (OK hate)?

Further reading: There is a Zombie Nazi Movies blog, which raises the important point - are the Nazi zombies or zombie Nazis? The argument could be made that zombies would struggle to hold political beliefs, so they can't be Nazi zombies, but are instead Nazis who are returned from the dead. However, what if they are innocent folks who have been zombified and then their Nazi creators have sent them out into the world to further their evil ends? Only you can decide.

See also: My Nazi occult films and horrors of war lists, as there is a lot of crossover between these lists.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 80 titles
How the West was weird. And how!!

About the list: While the original idea seems to be focused more on a horror/western mash-up it seems to now include Steampunk (with anachronistic steam-based technology) and other science fictional elements (the science fiction western). However, I'll not include the Space Westerns (where western-style stories are set in the future, like Firefly) as we want to keep focused on the western setting and there is probably enough material for a separate list. So the identifying factors: a cross-genre in a western setting (period or modern) with the addition of another genre to spice things up. The list mainly draws from the relevant Wikipedia entry, but as I wrote most of it I reckon that is OK.

Further reading: Paul Green's 2009 book Encyclopedia of Weird Westerns: Supernatural and Science Fiction Elements in Novels, Pulps, Comics, Films, Television and Games and About.coms Horror Westerns list.
 
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The big men of horror who are often called upon to play the biggest monsters. So they are both monstrously tall and play "monsters" (literally or figuratively inhuman).

Horror, especially backwoods horror and creature features, does rely on a very large man to increase the already considerable threat.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 291 titles
A list of weird Japanese films, if you are looking for the more violent films, then see the torture porn list.

I span the New Japanese Gore films off into their own list, as it was a phenomena well worth a more detailed look, and see also the second half of my Asian zombie films list (and the more exploitationy end of my period films list) and there also plenty of weird giant monster and ninja films.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 163 titles

the true epicure in the terrible, to whom a new thrill of unutterable ghastliness is the chief end and justification of existence, esteems most of all the ancient, lonely farmhouses of backwoods New England; for there the dark elements of strength, solitude, grotesqueness, and ignorance combine to form the perfection of the hideous.

"The Picture in the House" by HP Lovecraft (1920)


Movies that have protagonists who are outsiders getting lost in the countryside and usually have antagonists who are hostile, inbred locals, often utterly deranged, most likely perverted and sometimes mutated. In this list there are usually no supernatural elements and there is usually some kind of chase sequence but it can also feature more of a siege.

There is some crossover with folk horror films (which do contain supernatural elements) and is partly inspired by this list I found while researching that one. The more violent extremes of this list grade into torture porn and there is often an element of hicksploitation to the American-set films. I have a separate list for hunting humans, films which tend to involve an outsider hunting people for sport, as opposed to locals hunting outsiders for food or just their own weird sadistic pleasures.

See also: Splat Pack and New French Extremity films, two groups of recent film-makers whose output often strays into Backwoods Horror territory.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 72 titles
The real underground horror films, where the bulk of the film takes place in caves, tunnels, sewers, etc. The common factor is the dark, claustrophobic atmosphere and grim, remorseless predators (and perhaps mole people).

See also: Hollow Earth films, which are subterranean but not necessarily horror.

Further reading: Fearnet's guide to underground horror, although they also include films where creatures attack from below (it seemed worth a new list).
 
a list of 625 titles
Jidaigeki (時代劇) are, for the purposes of this list, period Japanese movies and TV, ranging from the stately samurai films to the wilder exploitation movies. As well as samurai, we have the ronin, ninja, yakuza and just simple folk. Most are relatively straightly-told tales of swordplay, but some do head off in fantastical directions.

Inclusion criteria: Really anything set before the 20th Century, although I am prepared to be flexible if it is more rural and involves swordplay but occurs in the early 20th Century. I have also included some non-Japanese films that are set in the period and include samurai (or similar).

Recurring themes: Historical stories and characters that we often see cropping up include: Miyamoto Musashi, The 47 Ronin (Chushingura), Jubei Yagyu and Shimizu no Jirocho.

Further reading: Patrick Galloway has released 2 books where he reviews 50 samurai films and gives profiles of the key directors and actors (but doesn't add much analysis or context, however, it is written in a nicely accessible way): Stray Dogs & Lone Wolves: The Samurai Film Handbook (2005) and Warring Clans, Flashing Blades: A Samurai Film Companion (2009); there is also: The Samurai Film (2007) by Alain Silver and Samurai Films (2008) by Roland Thorne. I haven't yet read Thorne's book but Silver's was exactly the kind of book I was looking for with an in-depth analysis of key directors, themes and characters, plus it includes a detailed filmography broken down by director or character/series or year - if you are looking to take your appreciation of jidaigeki onto a new level then that is the book for you.

Links[/link: 50 Classic Samurai (Chambara, Jidaigeki) Films, a solid list, Jidai Geki at TV Tropes.

[b]See also
: Yakuza and ninja films, which often have a period setting.

Availability: A number of companies have done a lot of hard work finding these films and giving them high quality home media releases: Criterion, AnimEigo, Eureka and the BFI. There are obvious problems with pre-1945 films from Japan but we still have some films from that period.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 121 titles
The future is war!!!*

A list for military science-fiction (MSF) movies and TV. However, actually pinning the definition down can be tricky.

David Weber, author of the Honor Harrington series, has defined military science-fiction as:


I would differentiate between what I consider to be "military science-fiction" and what I consider to be ... something else masquerading by the same name.

For me, military science-fiction is science-fiction which is written about a military situation with a fundamental understanding of how military lifestyles and characters differ from civilian lifestyles and characters. It is science-fiction which attempts to realistically portray the military within a science-fiction context. It is not "bug shoots." It is about human beings, and members of other species, caught up in warfare and carnage. It isn't an excuse for simplistic solutions to problems.

It's an opportunity to explore responsibilities, morality, sacrifices, and costs.


It is a strict definition and few on here tick all the boxes, but most manage to satisfy the majority of his criteria. Although it is purely subjective (and eventually comes down to "I know it when I see it"), my rule-of-thumb is along the lines of: future (or near future) conflict where some of the protagonists are members of a military organisation, possibly opposed by another such group (or hordes of alien beasties). Just don't hold me to that too strictly.

Further reading: TV Tropes, MSF film and TV at militaryscifi.com, Future War Stories a MSF blog, The Problem with Military Science Fiction, and What is Military Science Fiction? and Your Military Science Fiction Isn't Really Military Science Fiction at io9.

See also: Space horror, another list of mine focusing on the the crossover of horror and sci-fi in deep space (in the same way this isn't just where the war and sci-fi genres intersect). The horrors of war list is more a direct intersection of war and horror and might include some sci-fi elements where supersoldier programs go wrong. The madder superscience on my Nazi occult list could include films that come close to this list (Iron Sky perhaps?).

* A phrase lifted from the end of Atari Teenage Riot's "The Future of War."
 
a list of 114 titles
Seekers for ancient truths and artefacts. Treasure hunters, adventurers and scholars or just someone with a mission.

See also: Mummy movies, which often feature archaeologists, although they are often unfortunate victims. I also have an occult detective list, which has some crossover with this list, as well as being another well-known archetype.

Further reading: Adventurer Archaeologist

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
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In space no one can hear you scream


... unless you are in a spaceship or you've left your suit mike open or the filmmakers don't give a damn about physics and decide it'd make a cool scene.

Basically horror films that take place onboard spaceships or on alien (and often hostile) planets - a sub-genre of the sci-fi horror cross-genre. It does see to grade into sci-fi action or thrillers at the edges (especially where people are being hunted down and killed off one-by-one, for example).

Obviously Alien had a big impact on the scene, leading to numerous cheap rip-offs, but there is another phenomena which About.com highlight: "In horror movies, going into space seems to be the equivalent of a sitcom adding a cute little kid to the cast in a last-ditch effort to revitalize the series" and you can see plenty of examples here - once you've jumped the shark in your horror franchise where do you go? Space, that's where. I expect Final Destination 8 to be sub-titled: "Final Frontier".

I do love such films - many moons ago when I was a much smaller Emperor for a birthday treat I asked to watch a couple of videos - Alien and Dark Star. However, this was back when VCRs were just appearing - they were as big as a medium-sized herbivore and there were only a few thousand in the country, so my Dad had to haul home the one from his school and then we had to venture out to the dark and seedy video rental shop (that managed to cling on even after a large video rental store opened up down the road, just because of the atmosphere and selection of movies).

Also-rans: There are some that didn't quite make the list: Lifeforce, as not much of the horror elements are set in space, and Dark City, as the space angle is the twist ending and doesn't influence the rest of the film.

Further reading: In Space, No One Can Hear You Scream: Outer Space Horror Movies, The curse of outer space horror movies, The Astro-Horror! The Astro-Horror! Apollo 18 and Its Cinematic Kin, and Galaxy of Gore: 10 Must-See Horror Flicks Set in Space

See also: Military science-fiction as there is plenty of crossover where space marines have to take on the terrors of the spaceways.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and you can comment on this thread on the message board.
 
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Films that contain Nazi occultism, although this may grade into Nazi superscience or the supernatural where the dividing line is tricky to discern (the latter because the pseudoscience required is so extreme it almost conforms to Clarke's Third Law about science and magic), so it can touch on secret Third Reich bases in Antractica, Nazi UFOs and associated craziness.

Thanks to publications like Morning of the Magicians, there is an undercurrent of suspicion that the Nazis were up to all sorts of occult hi-jinks (beyond the well-known activities of the Ahnenerbe) and these films take that ball and run with it.

In his study of James Herbert's novel The Spear, Nick Freeman looks at the history of our interest in the Nazis, from the relative tame in the post-War years to the lurid in the 60s, with the occult aspects rising in popularity in the 70s:


Nazi occult experimentation may not have offered the same opportunities for pornographers as death camps and military brothels, but this did not mean that its treatment was any less sensational. Works such as Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier’s Le Matin des Magiciens (1960), Trevor Ravenscroft’s The Spear of Destiny (1972), and J. H. Brennan’s still more outlandish Occult Reich (1974) captured the popular imagination. Ravenscroft’s book is still in print, as is its sequel, The Mark of the Beast (1990), and a paperback reprint of Le Matin des Magiciens claimed a million copies had been sold by 1971 alone. All were fixated by supposedly secret or suppressed histories: the 1976 reprint of Brennan’s book boasts that it deals ‘in facts – but facts that orthodox historians ignore.’ Since the appearance of Nicholas Goodrich-Clark’s The Occult Roots of Nazism (1985), such works seem poorly researched and hysterically argued, but they were accorded considerable popular interest in the mid-1970s when Herbert was writing The Spear.


However, he does point out that the Nazi/occult mix can be dated back to Dennis Wheatley's 1941 novel Strange Conflict, the same date as the first film on this list.

References: Nick Freeman "'A decadent appetite for the lurid'?: James Herbert, The Spear and 'Nazi Gothic'"

Further reading: The Occult Roots of Nazism, as mentioned in the quote, this is one of the best researched and takes a level-headed approach to the topic as does Arktos: The Polar Myth in Science, Symbolism, and Nazi Survival. Raymond Sickinger's "Hitler and the Occult: The Magical Thinking of Adolf Hitler" is a good quick overview of the debate. Adam Shreve's "'Beunos Noches, Mein Fuhrer': A Look at Nazism in Popular Culture" is a pretty broad look at the influence of the Third Reich on our media. Why the Nazis and the Occult Plotlines in 'The Devil's Rock' Work so Well, a short piece on Nazi occultism in movies and why it is so effective.

See also: My Horrors of War and Nazi zombies/zombie Nazis lists, the latter in particular, as there is nothing Nazi occultists like to more than raise the dead for their nefarious purposes.

Links: TV Tropes have a number of pages that cover this: Those Wacky Nazis, Stupid Jetpack Hitler and most relevantly Ghostapo.

Others: Hardkor '44 still seems to be in the pipeline.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
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Zombie films with a title using the format "X vs Zombies" (or "Zombies vs X" and variants replacing "Zombies" with "Living Dead".

This form appeared relatively late in the game, with 1992's Urban Scumbags vs Countryside Zombies.

Ones yet to appear: Lesbians vs Zombies, Clowns vs Zombies, Frankenstein's Monster vs Zombies, Godzilla vs Zombies (my favourite idea), Romney vs Zombies (we all know there was more behind that "shooting accident" of his), Werewolves vs Zombies, Zombies vs Zombies, etc.

See also: of the Dead and Night of the Living two more lists of mine that deal with other popular forms of zombie movie title. Someone else has an X Zombies list where X = ninjas, cowboys, etc.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 182 titles
The Internet Archive is well-known for the Wayback Machine it hosts and they also have a very large selection of public domain media*, relevant to IMDB are the films they have and this is a list designed to bring together the horror ones. I largely made the list for myself, so I could keep a track of some of these early classics as I work through their catalogue (some are classic for being good, others for being so bad they are good and some are just bad) but I'm making it public as I'm sure there are other people out there who'd be interest - if nothing else you can grab the bad ones, some beer, some friends and hold your own MST3K (a number of them have appeared on the show). Although it is worth noting that not all of the lowest rated ones here appear in the Bottom 100 because they don't have the 1,500 votes needed to qualify - so get watching and get voting, the world need to seem some of these gems!!

The better known PD ones are available on some dirt cheap DVDs - I have quite a few on triple feature DVDs selling for £1** and there are 50 film boxsets selling for very little, most of them are worth the 30p/20 cents you'd pay for them, although free is better.

So here you'll find quite a few classics of German Expressionism, a good sampling of early zombie films (usually following more of the voodoo model, as these mainly pre-date Romero), films starring horror movie giants like Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, a number of films by Roger Corman, as well as some of the worst films ever made, which often makes them must-sees (e.g. Manos: The Hands of Fate).

One film I couldn't add to the list is Lunch Meat (Internet Archive), it has been wrongly classified as porn and can't be added to this list - I have highlighted the problem and hope to get it resolved.

See also: the equivalent list for science-fiction movies, there is some crossover with science-fiction/horror films so I've tended to include them in both. I've also started a similar list for public domain martial arts films

Further reading: If you want to track down other PD films outside of these genres then a good place to start is Wikipedia's list of public domain films in the US, which also explains the situation. Their page on public domain films has a wider focus. There are numerous sites offering public domain films but I can't really vouch for their checks (just Google them up), however, for horror there is Horrortheque and Openflix's horror section.

* I can't check the copyright status of each one but they are pretty diligent (although not perhaps as careful as the Gutenberg Project, but they might be being over cautious some times) so there are unlikely to be any legal issues, although you'd want to check the copyright situation in your own country to be sure (America has longer copyright period than somewhere like Australia, for example. So if you go by what is available in the US you should be fine). There are other places online with PD films but IA is the most trustworthy source.

** Bride of the Monster is on one of the DVDs, so I assume it is PD (as every other one appears to be), but not in the Internet Archive. I'll keep an eye out for that one.

NB: IMDB does include links to the Internet Archive videos on a few entries, but not all. I'll see what I can do about fixing that at some point but feel free to scoop up the links here and add them to the entries.

NB 2: Because of spam lists, IMDB has turned off external links in lists. I am waiting to see how permanent a change this is before updating all the items in this list.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 53 titles
There is a new trend among the more way-out Japanese films for wildly over-the-top stories and fountaining gore effects, perhaps as a reaction to the rampant success of the more ghostly Japanese horror films (at exactly the time some people were predicting the death of J-Horror) and tapping into the ero guro spirit that seems to surface sporadically in Japanese culture. This list, a spin-off from my one on weird Japanese films, will try and chart this development, as all these films have involvement from a small group of film makers.

Although drawing a line in the sand can be a little arbitrary I'm going with the start of this phenomena being the impressive success of Versus. The team would get back together again for Alive in 2002 and again for Battlefield Baseball in 2003, this time with writer Yudai Yamaguchi moving into the director's chair and being joined by producer Yoshinori Chiba, who would be a recurring presence throughout the rest of the list (first through his own company Media Suits, then with Nikkatsu one of Japan's oldest film production companies and then through the Nikkatsu subsidiary set-up specifically to work with such filmmakers).

The first of the New Japanese Gore films (nu J-Gore?) is really Meatball Machine, again directed by Yamaguchi with Versus/Battlefield Baseball/Death Trance star Tak Sakaguchi as action director, but bringing in the most important element - special effects monster Yoshihiro Nishimura, Japan's Tom Savini (I was going to go with "Japan's Screaming Mad George," as this would be a better stylistic parallel, but then remembered SMG is Japanese). The film gave the transgressive and transformational style of film like Tetsuo a more organic, body horror-style (possibly biopunk) makeover which helped set the standard for future films. Nishimura then provided the special effects for Machine Girl, which also brings in the final two key players in the story: visual effects wizard Tsuyoshi Kazuno and director Noboru Iguchi who moved over from directing adult videos, to more... exploitationy films (his earlier Sukeban Boy captures him in transition between the two). This then properly launched this new wave of Japanese gore films with a shifting line-up of writers, directors and effects people, with the same names cropping up time and again. in 2010 a lot of those highlighted here formed a production company called Sushi Typhoon.

There are other films that would fit in with these but I wanted to focus on those from the same family of creators (although it probably needs a family tree diagram to best explain it) - if you want more, and longer history going back before Versus, then I have a more complete list. If you are looking for the older violent and gory Japanese films, then you'll find them here.

I think one term that popped up might be telling: Gaijinsploitation. I've seen no real explanation of the term although the etymology is easy enough: gaijin is a Japanese term for foreigner, but there are no foreigners in the films being exploited, so are the films themselves exploiting us, the foreigner viewer, giving us what we think we want to see in a crazy Japanese film? After all it does seem the bulk of the early market was abroad - in early 2011 Noboru Iguchi said that "Nishimura and I always had much success with these films internationally at festivals, but it's only with the past few that we have developed an audience within Japan as well." Worth noting the involvement of Media Blasters in this (specifically their Tokyo Shock line) - they helped get Death Trance made and moved quickly to capitalise on Machine Girl which led to Tokyo Gore Police. Yoko Hayama works for Media Blasters and was the producer on these films and she said that they'd asked the creators "to make their story for adult, male audience in US" based on what they knew sold best in their Tokyo Shock line. If the creators were just giving us what they think we want, then there is a real danger of the titles becoming cliched and tired, in much the same way as the success of the ghost films, shinrei-mono, led to inferior imitators, unnecessary remakes and its ultimate downfall). However, the wild creative energy from those involved does seem to helping them leap over such pitfalls and forming their own production company looks like a positive step too. The real problem might come when Hollywood tries to cash-in on this, although the content may be too out-there to be properly re-bottle the lightning on American soil, so we'll wait and see.

There is an earlier film that is part of the connections here but isn't listed on IMDB although it has been released on DVD as Snot Rocket and Super Detective, as Nishimura has explained when talking about his working relationship with Tak:


The first job we did together was the independent film “The Snotty Detective” (released through Tokyo Shock in North America) with director Yudai Yamaguchi.


Anyway before, finally, getting to the list, I thought I'd highlight the way the core New Japanese Gore (NJG) films tend to fall into a number of general phases:

* The initial one where the key players started to assemble around Ryuhei Kitamura and they got a lot of international attention thanks to the success of Versus.
* The Fundoshi Corps films with producer Yukihiko Yamaguchi that set out the stall for the NJG films with Meatball Machine.
* The Fever Dreams (Media Blasters' production company for original content) co-productions with Nikkatsu through producers Yoko Hayama and Yoshinori Chiba (for Fever Dreams and Nikkatsu, respectively), which started at the end of the initial phase with Death Trance and would take NJG films.
* The Gaijinsploitation period which would build on the previous NJG films.
* The Sushi Typhoon films with Yoshinori Chiba as the main producer (it is a subsidiary of Nikkatsu).
* Nishimura Eizo films, it has the same name as Nishimura's special effects company but is listed separately here as a production company too, so he might be taking the work in-house. The output here is varied trying out new ideas and collaborations, from a couple of kaijufilms to contributing segments to anthology films some of which (like the portmanteau pieces) that keep the spirit of NJG alive.

Further reading: A good piece from Horror News and they have a follow-up looking at this set of films giving them the title Tokyo Gore" (which is almost unGooglable so I have no idea how widespread the usage is). Sketches of Cinema have a useful overview of the key releases.

See also: Splat Pack and New French Extremity films, movies from other groups of film-makers pushing the envelope of what is acceptable.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 20 people
Those old school special effects wizards who do most of their work with make-up and models on some of the greats of horror films.

So much is CGIed in modern movies that I wanted to salute those who got their hands dirty by advancing effects and are still implementing them today.
 
a list of 247 titles
Some of the strangest films I've seen come from China/Hong Kong/Taiwan. Mad magicians in crazed combat, hopping vampires and zombies in need of a roundhouse to the kisser.

About the list: There is a rough grouping a work and within them titles are ordered chronologically. We start with the precursors, setting the stage for the really boom which started with Black Magic (which is the first of a set of three films, with one pseudo-sequel thrown in), then we move onto the supernatural kung-fu films that helped inspire the hopping vampire (jiang shi) craze, before throwing in some more off offerings (some of those without a lot of kung-fu make up for it in the horror).

References: Spooky Encounters: A Gwailo's Guide to Hong Kong Horror by Daniel O'Brien (2003), the best guide to this subject.

See also: ninja films and Asian zombie films. In addition Eternal Evils of Asia list lists occult horror films from southern Asia.

There is also Ghoul Sex Squad, an adult hopping vampire film that adding to this list causes problems.
 
a list of 57 titles
French transgressive and horror films most of which have fallen under the label of the New French Extremity.

See also: Torture porn (and their antecedents), a list this one crosses over with due to the violence in a lot of these films. Splat Pack films, movies by a more tightly-knit group of anglophone creators whose work has often been labelled as 'torture porn' even though most of their output doesn't reach the heights (depths?) of some of the films listed here. New Japanese Gore films are also extreme films create by a closely-knit ground of movie-makers.

Further reading: The 8 Most Disturbing Films of The New Wave of French Horror, The Best French Horror And Extreme Films Of The Decade and 50 Must-See French Horror Movies (this last one looking at earlier films too). This blog has reviewed a lot of them in some depth.

Others: Anatomy of Hell is flagged as porn so can't be added.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 72 titles

Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never really care for anything else thereafter. You will meet them doing various things with resolve, but their interest rarely holds because after the other thing ordinary life is as flat as the taste of wine when the taste buds have been burned off your tongue.

"On the Blue Water" by Ernest Hemingway (1936)


Films about human hunting, where people are kidnapped so they can be hunted, often inspired by the 1924 short story "The Most Dangerous Game" but also by the real-life story of serial killer Robert Hansen who did the same thing in Alaska during the 80s. The tend to differ from chase films where the pursuit is usually unplanned and is often sparked by some random incident.

See also: There is clearly some crossover with Backwoods Horror / Rural Survival films but there the humans are usually opportunistically hunted, often not as sport but for... food or revenge or because of some unspecified sadistic bloodlust.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 67 titles
Films from the zombie's perspective or, at a push, where they are a sympathetic, leading protagonist who is fighting their baser urges. It is time to stick up for the rights of undead Americans and their decaying brethren worldwide.

There were a few precursors to this type of film but it really seems to have taken off from 2004 onwards, possibly because of the glut of recent zombie movies which has caused film-makers to cast around for another angle of attack.

Drawing the line is always going to be tricky here - Bud from Day of the Dead might count as could Big Daddy from Land of the Dead, but this seems to be part of Romero's exploration of the evolution of the zombie, re-learning lost tasks but, to my mind anyway, there seems to be a line lying between them and Fido. However, I'm open to being persuaded on this point.

See also: The vengeful dead, where the dead are returned with one thing on their mind (and it isn't cannibalism - the clues in the title) and they tend to be more compos mentis, where in this list they can often find themselves struggling with diminishing mental abilities and an increasing taste for human flesh. Also contagious violence films sometimes have a similar angle to this as they are infected, rather than being reanimated, so may try and hold off the effects of the virus as long as possible or try and cope with it (as in, for example, The Defiled).

Others: There is also a short film called Brains apparently not listed here.

Further reading: 12 Zombie Movies that Root for the Zombies

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 23 titles
Zombie films set in the past, as opposed to just old zombie films because you can bring modern takes on the genre to older settings.

See also: My Zombie Nazi / Nazi zombie list, as a number are set during WWII.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off and replaced it with a thread on the message board.
 
a list of 90 titles
Films featuring jiangshi (or jiang shi, chiang-shih, gangshi or kyonshi - 僵尸 or 殭屍). Despite being called vampires they aren't much like the western vampires (although in some films they do sprout fangs), the strict translation of the name is "stiff corpse" and this is what they largely are, dressed in Qing dynasty costumes. The Taoist monk reanimates corpses as this makes it easier to transport them back to their home villages for burial. Unfortunately, something usually goes wrong and hi-jinks ensure.

References: Spooky Encounters: A Gwailo's Guide to Hong Kong Horror by Daniel O'Brien (2003), the best guide to this subject.

Further reading: Taoist Priests and Hopping Vampires a useful overview of the background and the films (also includes a link to reviews, includes a couple of non-CHV films too). There are also a couple of solid overviews here and here. "Hop on Pop: Jiangshi Films in a Transitional Context" (2009) by Stephanie Lam, originally in CineAction #78 page 46. TV Tropes have a page on their appearance in other media, the most significant of which is Phantom Fighter, a NES game based on Mr Vampire.

See also: This is a sub-list of crazy kung-fu horror films, this list helps put the development of the films in more context. I also have a list for zombie movies and Asian zombie films, as, despite the name, they are closest to zombies and there is also some crossover.
 
a list of 16 titles
Films featuring the krasue, penanggalan or leyak, transformed witches from SE Asian folklore, they can fall into the general aswang category but very specifically the head comes off and flies around.

Other films not currently listed here, include My Mother is Arb (1980) and Nieng Arp (2004), as well as Burn the Witch (aka Plerng Ches Arb) (2004).

Further reading: Leaks, Penanggalans and Krasues, Oh My!, a good overview of this sub-sub-genre, and there is an attempt to compile a full list here (which I've tried to draw on to expand this list).

Availability: Usually pretty poor in the West, Mystics in Bali has a nice release from Mondo Marcabo but some of the classics like Witch With Flying Head haven't got an English-language release, not even through less than legal sources.

See also: The Eternal Evils of Asia, a broader list on SE Asian occult horror.
 
a list of 19 titles
Zombie films with a title using the format "Night of the Living X." Clearly riffing on Romero's "Night of the Living Dead."

See also: of the Dead and vs Zombies two more lists of mine that deal with other popular forms of zombie movie title. Someone else has an X Zombies list where X = ninjas, cowboys, etc.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 15 people
A list of those pre-WWII writers of horror stories adapted into film or TV.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 89 titles
The 72 "video nasties" compiled by the Director of Public Prosecutions and published in 1983, 39 of which were deemed "obscene" by the courts. The kind of films that, during my youth, were either passed around like samizdat literature on piss poor VHS tapes or were beyond our limited reach and so became the source of wild rumours about their lurid contents. Most proved rather disappointing when we finally tracked them down (although some rank amongst my favourite films), but being banned did add an extra level of enjoyment to tracking them down and watching them. Following the retirement of chief scourge of video nasties James Ferman, a lot of the films have since been resubmitted and most have passed with no cuts, those that remain cut tend to include violence to animals and women. Interestingly, Ferman's retirement in 1999 coincided with a renaissance in British horror films, as can be demonstrated in this graph. Coincidence?

I have grouped the videos by whether they were or were not prosecuted and then related films from the same period that were caught up in the moral panic (basically the grouping they have on Wikipedia), rounding things out with some documentaries. I've also provided a few quick details of the film's fate although I've not been too specific as there can be multiple versions of one title and the situation can change, so do your homework before buying.

Sources: Video Nasties list and The Complete Video Nasties List , both of which give an overview of the films (the former is the most in-depth).

Further reading: Seduction of the Gullible: The Truth Behind the Video Nasty Scandal (2007) by John Martin. The Evil Dead, The Living Dead and the dead wrong , a Guardian article looking back on the period, prompted by the release of the following DVD:

Further viewing: Video Nasties: The Definitive Guide (R2). There are also two collections, both also R2:

* Box of the Banned, contains: The Evil Dead, Zombie Flesh Eaters, The Driller Killer, The Last House on the Left, Nightmares in a Damaged Brain, I Spit on Your Grave and Ban the Sadist Videos!. I didn't buy this one as some of the films are cut, I have either already seen some and the ones I wanted to buy I got in better quality and uncut DVDs.

* Box of the Banned 2, contains: Tenebrae, Contamination, Don't Go Near the Park, The Witch Who Came From the Sea, Evilspeak and Ban the Sadist Videos! Part 2. I have this one as it seemed a reasonably-priced collection with a few films I was curious about seeing.

See also: Torture porn films (and their antecedents), my wider list of similar films from around the world. Someone else has done a list on "roughies," which I know little about but according to Sleazoid Express: A Mind-twisting Tour Through the Grindhouse Cinema of Times Square they are "extreme, sexually motivated movies". Both lists demonstrate that there is far worse lurking out there, and the films that made the list seem rather random.
 
a list of 42 titles
The world is hollow like an Easter Egg (of there are deep systems of tunnels we don't know about - the Honeycomb Earth) and these films reveal what lies within, honest. ;)

Inclusion criteria: I'm mainly aiming at those films (and TV shows) that feature some unknown or lost world beneath the surface of the Earth. Tunnelling and travelling to the Earth's centre, might only count if they encounter something strange down there but may count if they

See also: Subterranean horror.

Further reading: The ever-reliable TV Tropes has sections on Hollow World.
 
a list of 19 titles
Films inspired by the fear of "hoodies" and concerns over Broken Britain - the fear of the feral underclass bubbling up to the surface (and some more redeeming stories too).

Some of these films might not be classed as horror but they almost all contain violence.

This list is partly inspired by this article from The Guardian. See also this piece on the representation of black people in these current films.

See also:The British horror renaissance, of which these films form an interesting part. Attack the block, my list for tower block based action and horror. Someone else has a heartless britain list which crossesover with this one and expands on the theme.
 
a list of 20 titles
My subterranean horror list mainly focused on caves, tunnels, sewers, mines, etc. but there are related films in which monsters pounce on their victims by tunnelling or burrowing up beneath them. So here is that list.

Further reading: Fearnet's guide to underground horror also includes these films, which partly prompted this spin off - after all I do like the Tremors films, so I might as well try and group together as many similar films as possible.
 
a list of 99 titles
As mentioned in my crazy kung-fu horror films list, quite a few of those films have as their theme the idea that South East Asia is filled with dark supernatural evil that'll have any poor Chinese travellers pissing maggots before they've unpacked their bags.

Being neighbourly, and not wanting to disappoint anyone, filmmakers in the countries decided to produce films that pretty much confirm the suspicion that, deep in the jungles of southern Asia, there is a witch around every cornering waiting to munch on your unborn child or make insects spew from your urethra. This is a list of such films.

Availability can be poor but people like Mondo Macabro have been giving some of those films a fancy release in the West. However, there is plenty that don't even have an IMDB listing, so this will have to be your springboard to further exploration rather than a comprehensive guide.

See also: Witches with Flying Heads, Asian zombie movies and The Blood Collection. In addition my Folk Horror list has other films from around the globe that mix occult horror and folklore.

Links: Useful blogs: Backyard Asia, Bamboo Gods and Bionic Boys, and Mondo Macabro's blog
 
a list of 35 titles
Movies from the The Splat Pack, a group of film creators who have tended to push the envelope in recent horror flicks, who are partly responsibly for torture porn. There is also heavy crossover with backwoods horror.

Leading Splat Packer Eli Roth has said "We all have the same agenda: to bring back really violent, horrific movies."

Source: The Splat Pack Wikipedia article (and the links there).

See also: New French Extremity films, a loose group of French films that are pushing the envelope.
 
a list of 18 titles
Although the Urban Dictionary has a number of definitions I'm going with this one:


the exploitation of nerds by producers of nerd-oriented films, books, or television shows.

You know none of the actors or producers of The Big Bang Theory are nerds. That show is nothing but pure nerdsploitation


So it would usually have to be made by non-nerds and it helps if it includes obvious nerdesque topics, like D&D or Comic Con.

Are they laughing with this or about us? Is Michael Cera nerdsploitation's Richard Roundtree? You decide.

Links: "I'm Gonna Git You Spamma" what actual nerdsploitation might look like.

Comments: As I don't have a Facebook account I cannot interact with the new comments system, so have switched it off. I will start a thread on the message board and link it in here shortly.
 
a list of 8 titles
Films released by the Sushi Typhoon production company, there is strong crossover with my New Japanese Gore list but is worth one of its own.
 
a list of 22 titles
Films that contain the dreaded flying guillotine.
 
a list of 12 titles
The Internet Archive is well-known for the Wayback Machine it hosts and they also have a very large selection of public domain media*, relevant to IMDB are the films they have and this is a list designed to bring together the science-fiction ones. I largely made the list for myself, so I could keep a track of some of these early classics as I work through their catalogue (some are classic for being good, others for being so bad they are good and some are just bad) but I'm making it public as I'm sure there are other people out there who'd be interest - if nothing else you can grab the bad ones, some beer, some friends and hold your own MST3K (a number of them have appeared on the show).

So here we have the classic Master of the Flying Guillotine along with a couple of Bruceploitation films, some reasonable kung-fu films and the oddity that is The Impossible Kid.

See also: the equivalent lists for horror and science-fiction.

Further reading: If you want to track down other PD films outside of these genres then a good place to start is Wikipedia's list of public domain films in the US, which also explains the situation. Their page on public domain films has a wider focus. There are numerous sites offering public domain films but I can't really vouch for their checks (just Google them up).

* I can't check the copyright status of each one but they are pretty diligent (although not perhaps as careful as the Gutenberg Project, but they might be being over cautious some times) so there are unlikely to be any legal issues, although you'd want to check the copyright situation in your own country to be sure (America has longer copyright period than somewhere like Australia, for example. So if you go by what is available in the US you should be fine). There are other places online with PD films but IA is the most trustworthy source.
 
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The loose collection of films that span off from the Doctor Mabuse books.

Further reading: The Strange Case of Dr. Mabuse: A Study of the Twelve Films and Five Novels by David Kalat (2005) - Amazon.com and .co.uk

See also: Bonkers - my list of odd films
 
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Makers of Splat Pack films.

Source: The Splat Pack Wikipedia article (and the links there).

In alphabetical order:
 
a list of 6 titles
Opinion varies on what is part of the Blood Island sequence of films, but this is the list of films that were released as "The Blood Collection" which includes the Blood Island films.
 
a list of 34 titles
Kung-fu films that feature a decent percentage of the Five Venoms (to be a contender it needs 3 or more of the 6, yes I know, confusing but Wei Pai/Snake was one of the 5 Venoms in the film but doesn't usually appear in the Venoms' films. I will note a few examples with only 2 of the core Venoms). All but one are directed by Chang Cheh and they are all from the Shaw Brothers. Anything else is a cheap cash-in and, to be honest, some of the ones on the list might also be but you'll have to judge that for yourself.

List order: We include a few proto-Venom films in which the team started to coalesce before the Five Deadly Venoms films and then, following that films success, the appearance of members of the group in other films often using a similar formula (with the same actors playing similar roles). As the films came thick and fast I've also noted the release dates (at least according to IMDB, some sources vary) - HK ones unless otherwise noted.

Further reading: Venom Filmography.

Key:

Centipede - Lu Feng
Snake - Wei Pai
Scorpion - Sun Chien
Lizard - Kuo Chui/Philip Kwok
Toad - Lo Meng
Last Student - Chiang Sheng