Reviews written by registered user
don_agu

Send an IMDb private message to this author or view their message board profile.

Page 1 of 4:[1] [2] [3] [4] [Next]
33 reviews in total 
Index | Alphabetical | Chronological | Useful

49 out of 81 people found the following review useful:
Ghandi, 2 February 2005
3/10

I wonder who, how and more importantly why the decision to call Richard Attenborough to direct the most singular sensation to hit Broadway in many many years? He's an Academy Award winning director. Yes, he won for Ghandi you moron! Jeremy Irons is an Academy winning actor do you want to see him play Rocky Balboa? He has experience with musicals. Really? "Oh what a lovely war" have you forgotten? To answer your question, yes! The film is a disappointment, clear and simple. Not an ounce of the live energy survived the heavy handedness of the proceedings. Every character danced beautifully they were charming but their projection was theatrical. I felt nothing. But when I saw it on stage I felt everything. The film should have been cast with stars, unknown, newcomers but stars with compelling unforgettable faces even the most invisible of the group. Great actors who could dance beautifully. Well Michael Douglas was in it. True I forgot I'm absolutely wrong and you are absolutely right. Nothing like a Richard Attenborough Michael Douglas musical.

115 out of 126 people found the following review useful:
The Colin Farrell Mystery Is Revealed, 10 January 2006
9/10

What a stunning surprise! A family saga without familiar places or I should say that there are all familiar places but they feel completely new. I'm not one who likes to give away plot points so I won't I just want to say that I loved the loving involved in the unfolding of this realistic fairy tale. Personally, I've been questioning the apparent success of Colin Farrell. In very short years he worked with everybody from Stone to Spielberg, co starred with Pacino, Cruise and Willis but other than a winning pout and a clear willingness to take risks, his appeal eluded me - until last night that is. "A Home At The End Of The World" made me fall in love with him, with his power with his utter fearlessness. He creates a character with his heart in his sleeve and an innocence that it's compelling, aggressively on your face. Sweet and tough, wise and naive. Robin Wright Penn is also a standout. Her truth, unusual as it is, is unmistakable. Sissi Spaceck's suburban mom is an extraordinary creation. Subversive without meaning to, lovingly subversive, that's what she is. The opening with a startling Ryan Donowho grabs you by your heart and your throat and doesn't let you go. Wondering why this film didn't become an instant classic I arrived to the uncomfortable conclusion that it has to do with the casting of Colin's life long friend, Dallas Roberts, a good actor but not charismatic enough to give us a compelling pairing. I agree that he should be awkward and different but there is an element of petulance and physicality who didn't allow me to care for him as much as I wanted, as much as I needed. Sorry I had to mention that. But the experience that this little big film provides is unforgettable and the revelation of Colin Farrell mystique as an actor is nothing short of breathtaking.

Alfie (2004)
124 out of 249 people found the following review useful:
OutLaw, 7 January 2005
1/10

I saw Jude Law for the first time on Broadway on an adaptation of a Jean Cocteau play. He was a stunner. You could see his future even from where I was sitting, one of the cheapest sits at the back of the theatre. Then "Gattaca" a poor film that Jude Law's presence alone awarded some sort of cult status. Other films with the likes of Jeanne Moreau, David Cronnenberg, Jenifer Jason Leigh. All good stuff, all seem to confirm my original impression. Then, "Wilde" and "The Talented Mr. Ripley" and I thought -- Amazing, we haven't had an actor like this, ever. Forget about his beauty, if you can, and concentrate in his mind boggling range. In Mr. Ripley the film never recovers from his death and in "Wilde" you understand, you actually understand Oscar Wilde, losing absolutely everything for him. He introduced the only entertaining moments in "Artificial Intelligence" and then, something happened, too many films and not too much judgement. In "Cold Mountain" he didn't have the epic scope that, in my modest opinion, the character required. In "Road to Perdition" he indulges in a shallow show off performance overshadowed by a theatrical costume and rotten teeth. But "Alfie" is, quite simply, unforgivable. Not a moment of truth, not a moment of charm, not a moment of beauty. The three elements that brought Jude Law up this moment. I left the theatre more than disappointed, I left angry because I recognised the symptoms of a potentially, mythological career, in real danger. I hope Jude Law sees the light, unless he is satisfied with the Troy Donohue award. If that's the case, well, he already got it. "Alfie" got it for him.

27 out of 47 people found the following review useful:
Smaller Fish, 21 October 2007
7/10

Blake Morrison's memories are served for public consumption in a respectful but slightly confused rendition. Jim Broadbent delight us, once more, with his overgrown child of a father that seems a figment of her son's imagination. His childishness seems to be his only flaw. I couldn't help but being reminded of Tim Burton's "Big Fish" this time, with radically different flights of fancy. Colin Firth plays the writer/son as a crashing bore. Was that on purpose? I've been longing to see Firth again in parts like the ones he so amazingly captured - "Apartment Zero" comes to mind. Here earnest or not earnest, loving, selfish and so forth I didn't quite get myself interested enough to care as much as I feel I should have. Matthew Beard, the younger Blake and Juliet Stevens as the mother, manage to create more intriguing characters. The film, however, belongs to Jim Broadbent - His character is a loving mix of assorted British loving eccentrics. The fact that this is the way her son Blakes remembers him, makes the experience worth while.

97 out of 120 people found the following review useful:
Before And After Zero, 20 August 2004
10/10

I was so shaken the first time I saw "Apartment Zero" that in my film going experiences, everything I see is somehow related to that initial overwhelming emotion. Many thought I was a suitable case for treatment, as the film takes you where, a normal human being, wouldn't like to venture. Maybe that's it, maybe there is something of Adrian in all of us, Colin Firth's masterful performance, makes that uncomfortable assumption, pretty plausible. Someone who's not at ease around other human beings, suddenly, for practical reasons, allows one into his life and becomes an addict. He cannot do without that presence without that fear without that feeling. No film ever has been able to tell us that in such a gripping, entertaining, cinematic way.

159 out of 182 people found the following review useful:
The Smiling Game, 8 December 2005
10/10

There's never been a character like "Kitten" on the screen before or an actor like Cillian Murphy for that matter. What a feast of a film! What a joyful race through a desolate existence dressed in smiles and hope and gratefulness. Neil Jordan's introduce us to this extraordinary real life character with the magical slant of a fairy tale. A lesson for all seasons. A unique portrait of a victim that behaves like a hero. The idea of victim doesn't even enter the orbit of his reality. How beautiful! I hope this marvellous film find its way to a large audience. I want everyone to feel what I felt. I was enthralled by the positiveness at the heart of its message. And if all this wasn't enough. Liam Neeson! Giving the best performance of his career as the most human of the imperfect humans that populate the planet. Do yourself a favour, put aside preconceptions and run to have breakfast on Pluto.

1088 out of 1395 people found the following review useful:
Ang Lee's Cowboys, 17 September 2005
10/10

What an extraordinary accomplishment! Ang Lee presents us with something we've known about but we've never seen. Profoundly honest, stunning to look at, superbly acted. I could go on with the superlatives because I feel lifted by the experience. You've all heard the ins and outs of the subject treated here. Well, forget it, the words used are used words and do not apply here. "Brokeback Mountain" introduce us to something utterly new, daring you and me to be indifferent. The film is about us, really. Love as an unexpected blow that makes you find and confront yourself. Jake Gylenhaal gives a performance that you'll never forget. Michelle Williams and Ann Hathaway are incredibly good but the film belongs to Heath Ledger. I'm not going to talk about revelations or Oscar buzz, I'm just going to let you know that what he does in this film is so courageously beautiful, so truthful and so transcendental that his Ennis del Mar is bound to become a point of reference not just for us but for generations to come.

50 out of 61 people found the following review useful:
Beautifully raw, 5 April 2009
8/10

I was taken by the melancholy and the beauty of the film and if this wasn't enough, Colin Firth's performance! His best since "Apartment Zero" and that is saying something. Not a single false move in a film that could very easily become a simple tearjerker. Colin as a dad who takes care of his young daughters after the tragic death of his wife is simply extraordinary. The humanity of his character, flaws and all, is immediately recognisable. The film is filled with an emotional form of suspense that makes the experience utterly unnerving at times. Genova, the city, is photographed with real gusto. The narrow "vicoli" create a sense of dislocation that underlines in the most poetic way the new roads that Colin and his daughters are, not merely finding, but forging for themselves. A delightful surprise.

63 out of 65 people found the following review useful:
Every Little Bit, 1 January 2005
10/10

Over the years this little gem of a film has become a personal favourite. I revisit it continuously, I enjoy showing it to someone who never heard of it and it never fails. The emotions are renewed and reinvigorated with each viewing. Jesse Bradford is simply phenomenal and so is Adrian Brody, yes him, "the kissing pianist" in a remarkable early performance. The face of Karen Allen, as the teacher, listening to Jesse Bradford read his tall tale, profoundly aware that she has someone truly special in her class, is so beautiful that goes in an out of my memory bank more often than the names of some of my closest relatives. Spalding Gray and Elizabeth McGovern's characters deserve a full movie of their own. Lisa Eichhorn's tender fear of having to leave her children behind is just another of the ravishing notes of this stunning film. If you haven't seen it. Give yourself the pleasure. You are going to love every little bit of it.

245 out of 402 people found the following review useful:
The Turning Point Of Woody Allen, 10 December 2005
10/10

A Noir with English accents. A modern, ancient tale with super stars of the future and a score of crackling vinyl original recordings of timeless arias. A sixtysomething filmmaker with the flair of an impertinent newcomer. A masterpiece. Engrossing, entertaining, elegant, wicked. The meeting between the splendorous Scarlett Johanssen and the breathtaking Jonathan Rhys-Meyers at the ping pong table is right out "A Place In The Sun" - Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift at the pool table - the feeling is James Cain and Patricia Highsmith but the result is unique, bold, enthralling. Allen's British dialogues are refreshingly startling and I don't intend to spoil the pleasure of its perverse surprises by hinting at any of them. Just let me say that if you love cinema, rush to see it.


Page 1 of 4:[1] [2] [3] [4] [Next]